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Full text of "Los Angeles Standard Guide San Diego Including the Panama California Exposition at San Diego"

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HANDBOOK OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 



ILLUSTRATED 



PRICE TWENTY- FIVE CENTS 







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IT'S ALL BETWEEN THE COVERS 



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TheToyo Kisen Kaisha 



ORIENTAL 



STEAMSHIP 



CO M P A N Y 



THE NEW TRIPLE SCREW TURBINE STEAMERS 

S. S. "Chiyo Maru," "Tenyo Maru" 

"Shinyo Maru" 



22,000 Tons 



21 Knots 



TWIN SCREW STEAMERS 



"Nippon Marit& ^Hongkong Maru m 



11,000 Tons 



17 Knots 



BETWEEN SAN FRANCISCO AND THE FAR 
EAST, JAPAN, CHINA, PHILIPPINES AND 
ORIENTAL PORTS, VIA HONOLULU 



These vessels present the farthest advance in the science of shipbuilding, being 
equipped with every modern device for the safety, convenience, comfort and enter- 
tainment of passengers, including Wireless Telegraph. Automatic Safety Devices. 
Electric Light in every berth, Electric Fans in every stateroom. Porcelain Bath- 
tubs. Steam Laundry, Nursery and Playground for Children, Open Air Gymnasium. 
Moving Picture Shows, Swimming Tanks. Orchestral Concerts. 

PERFECT SERVICE — UNEQUALED CUISINE 

Detailed information regarding sailings, rates of passage, around the world tours, 
etc.. can be obtained on application to all Railroad Ticket Agents and Tourist 
Agencies in the United States and Canada, or to 

W. H. AVERY, Asst. Gen. Mgr. or W. H. MAGEE, Gen. Pass. Agent 

Entire fourth floor Merchants National Bank Bldg.. 625 Market St., San Francisco 




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SECTION OF MAIN SELLING FLOOR SHOWING ENTRANCE, TO THE BLACK A"ND 
GOLD FRENCH SLIPPER; ROOM A LOS ANGELES SHOP 

MOST BEAUTIFUL SHOE SHOPS 

THE WORLD 

AN UNUSUAL 



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EXCLUSIVE 

SPECIALTY 

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DEVOTING 1 

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TO THE 

CREATION 
AND KETAILING OF 
SMART SHOES FOR WOMEN 

CHILDRBNS 




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BLACK AND GOLD 
FRENCH SLIPPER ROOM 
SAN FRANCISCO SHOP 








the BOOTERY 

Smart Shoes for Women 




*$* «s« 







LOS ANGELES 

432 BROADWAY 






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rTARYLAND 
HOTEL 



SAN FRANCISCO 

15 2 G EAR V ST. 

SANTA BARBARA 

POTTER- 
HOTEL 



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LOS ANGELES SHOP 




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HOTEL WESTMINSTER Los Angeles 

OF ESTABLISHED REPUTATION AND STANDING 



Centrally located at the corner of Main and Fourth Streets, 
and moderate prices. 



Cafe famed for its service 




NATATORIUM. BIMINI HOT SPRINGS 



BIMINI HOT SPRINGS 

Twenty minutes from business center of Los Angeles. L. A. Electric 
(yellow) cars from all depots. The only natural hot mineral baths in the 
city. Visitors welcome. See the great swimming pools, private tub 
rooms, treatment section, bottling and shipping works, etc. Hotel in 
connection, where patients are cared for. Tourists who have not visited 
Bimini Hot Springs have not seen Los Angeles. 

Write for literature. Address 



BIMINI HOT SPRINGS 



Los Angeles, California 



■ 



NOTE the ILLUSTRATIONS 



. 



IN THIS BOOK 



We make them by all processes 

in all screens up to 175 line 



an 




Also direct tri-color process 



A complete Art Department at your service 



Times-Mirror Printing & Binding House 

PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS, BOOKBINDERS 



114-116-118 South Broadway 



Los Angeles, California 



" 



PRINTING 



vs 



PRINTING 



We don't care to fool with it if it is a cheap job. If it 
requires special attention we are right there with the 
goods. High-class work is our hobby. That is where we 
prove the superiority of our plant and our organization. 



ART WORK 
ENGRAVING 
PRINTING 
BINDING 



plus 



ORIGINALITY 
EFFICIENCY 
QUALITY 
PERFECTION 



— the plus is what has made Sunset Publishing House the biggest, 
best equipped, most successful printing plant west of Chicago. 

Let us give you a figure on that next job — from d u m in y to 
deliver y — art work, printing;, binding. You know from the start 
what the entire job will cost. One price covers it. 



SUNSET PUBLISHING HOUSE 



448-470 Fourth St. 



Phone: Douglas 3140 
Private Exchange All Departme?its 



SAN FRANCISCO 






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COMMERCIAL 
TRUST 



AMD 



SAVINGS 




SUCCESSOR TO 



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MAXIMUM 



EFFICIENC Y 



IN 



BANKING SERVICE 




T your service is an organiza- 
tion highly developed in all 
branches of commercial bank- 
ing, together with an experienced 
management giving personal attention 
to its clients' needs and offering every 
facility consistent with conservative 
banking methods. 




AFE guarding our depositors is a 
paid-up capital of $750,000.00 
and surplus of over $250,000.00 
with resources of nearly $7,000,000.00 
Our Directorate is composed of a 
body of men who DIRECT all trans- 
actions of this institution. 




OUR convenient locations com- 
plete this chain of efficient serv- 
ice. The home institution at 
Sixth and Main Streets anticipates the 
needs of the traveling public by an 
All Day and Night Banking service 
with its well equipped safe deposit 
vaults at your disposal any hour. 



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ITH the exception of the 
night service, other branches 
at 209 South Broadway, 214 
West 10th, and 2412 South Hoover 
offer the same maximum of efficiency, 
An invitation is extended visitors to 
Los Angeles to make any one or all of 
these banks their banking home while 
in the city. 



OFFICERS 



MARCO H. HELLMAN, President 
IRVING H. HELLMAN, Vice-Pres. 
C. R. BELL, Secretary 
EMANUEL COHEN, Cashier 



B. H. SMITH, Asst. Cashier 

H. B. KELLEY, Asst. Cashier 

E. R. MILLAR, Asst. Cashier 

HENRY SCHROFFENBERGER, Asst. Cashie 



DIRECTORS 

W. H. HOLLIDAY, Chairman of the Board of Directors 



LOUIS M. COLE 
W. J. DORAN 
M. H. HELLMAN 
W. L. VALENTINE 
JAS. SHULTZ 
T. J. FLEMING 



E. W. SARGENT 
HARRY L HARRIS 
M. A. HAMBURGER 
L. C. BRAND 
JOHN T. COOPER 
IRVING H. HELLMAN 
HENDERSON HAYWARD 



C. G. LYNCH 
I. L. HIBBARD 
GEORGE B. EPSTEIN 
H. C. FRYMAN 
BENJAMIN E. PAGE 
WILLARD H. STIMSON 



STANDARD GUIDE 

TO LOS ANGELES, SAN DIEGO 



AND 



T H 




PANAMA- 



CALIFORNIA EXPOSITION 




ONTAINS an accurate description of all points of interest. 
Gives the history, progress and development of Los Angeles 
and vicinity including the Exposition at San Diego. 




Locates and describes all places of general importance such as 
parks, churches, theatres, banks, hotels, public buildings, retail and 
wholesale shopping districts, cafes, amusement places, etc. Each 
topic treated in strict alphabetical order. Includes Notable Hotels 
of Southern California and Special Pleasure Trips for the Tourist. 



FULLY ILLUSTRATED 



Copyright 1914 by the North American Press Association 



All Rights Reserved 






Compiled 



a n a 



Published 



by 



the 



NORTH AMERICAN PRESS 

ASSOCIATION ^N FRANCISCO 



HEARST 
BUILDING 



CALI FORNIA 




' ■ '- 







COMMERCIAL 
TRUST 



AMD 



SAVINGS 



S&i^*^/ 



SUCCESSOR TO 



V'l •• 







MAXIMUM 



EFFICIENCY 



IN 



BANKING SERVICE 




T your service is an organiza- 
tion highly developed in all 
branches of commercial bank- 
ing, together with an experienced 
management giving personal attention 
to its clients* needs and offering every 
facility consistent with conservative 
banking methods. 




AFE guarding our depositors is a 
paid-up capital of $750,000.00 
and surplus of over $250,000.00 
with resources of nearly $7,000,000.00. 
Our Directorate is composed of a 
body of men who DIRECT all trans- 
actions of this institution. 




OUR convenient locations com- 
plete this chain of efficient serv- 
ice. The home institution at 
Sixth and Main Streets anticipates the 
needs of the traveling public by an 
All Day and Night Banking service 
with its well equipped safe deposit 
vaults at your disposal any hour. 



W 



ITH the exception of the 
night service, other branches 
at 209 South Broadway, 214 
West 10th, and 2412 South Hoover 
offer the same maximum of efficiency, 
An invitation is extended visitors to 
Los Angeles to make any one or all of 
these banks their banking home while 
in the city. 



OFFICERS 



MARCO H. HELLMAN, President 
IRVING H. HELLMAN, Vice-Pres. 

C. R. BELL, Secretary 

EMANUEL COHEN, Cashier 



B. H. SMITH, Asst. Cashier 

H. B. KELLEY, Asst. Cashier 

E. R. MILLAR, Asst. Cashier 

HENRY SCHROFFENBERGER, Asst. Cashier 



DIRECTORS 



W. H. HOLLIDAY, Chairman of the Board of Directors 



LOUIS M. COLE 
W. J. DORAN 
M. H. HELLMAN 
W. L. VALENTINE 
JAS. SHULTZ 
T. J. FLEMING 



E. W. SARGENT 

HARRY L HARRIS 
M. A. HAMBURGER 
L. C. BRAND 
JOHN T. COOPER 
IRVING H. HELLMAN 
HENDERSON HAYWARD 



C. G. LYNCH 
I. L. HIBBARD 
GEORGE B. EPSTEIN 
H. C. FRYMAN 
BENJAMIN E. PAGE 
WILLARD H. STIMSON 



STANDARD GUIDE 

TO LOS ANGELES, SAN DIEGO 

PA 
CALIFORNIA EXPOSITION 







ONTAINS an accurate description of all points of interest. 
Gives the history, progress and development of Los Angeles 
and vicinity including the Exposition at San Diego. 




Locates and describes all places of general importance such as 
parks, churches, theatres, banks, hotels, public buildings, retail and 
wholesale shopping districts, cafes, amusement places, etc. Each 
topic treated in strict alphabetical order. Includes Notable Hotels 
of Southern California and Special Pleasure Trips for the Tourist. 



FULLY ILLUSTRATED 



Copyright 1914 by the North American Press Association 



All Rights Reserved 








Compiled 



a ?i a 



P u b i is h e d 



by 



the 



NORTH AMERICAN PRESS 



HEARST 
BUILDING 



ASSOCIATION 



SAN FRANCISCO 
CALI FORNIA 






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"Where bon-vivants, epi- 
cures and connoisseurs from 
all parts of the world gather 



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eat, drink an 



then 



praise 



The place where you find the best 



for the 1 



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The All Star Cabaret 



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CAFE BRISTOL 

WM. SCHNEIDER, Prop. 

H. W. Hellman Building 

FOURTH AND SPRING 

LOS ANGELES 



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Visit 

This Rare Gollection 

World - Gathered 
Treasares 

DISPLAY that has 



tracted the attention 
and admiration of travelers 

from all parts 



the world awaits 



enjoyment 



visitors 



store 



Feagans & Company, jewelers. 

Here have been gathered from the fonr 

quarters of the earth a collection of suberb 
jewelry and gems, gold ware, and silverware, 
watches and clocks, stationery and myriad 
small wares, such as will delight the heart of 
all who love the rare and the beautiful. 

It is a display worthy the name of an art ex- 
hibit and will repay in pleasure and in profit, 
a visit by any one. 

You are more than welcome to inspect 
at your leisure — regardless of intent to 

—and the values you will find hard 



to resist. 



EAGANS 



OMPANY 



Exclusive Jewelers, Society Stationers 

218 West Fifth Street 

Alexandria Hotel Bldg, 

Pasadena Store — Hotel Maryland 






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LOS ANGELES -SAN DIEGO 



And How To See Them 



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'ANY books, pamphlets and leaflets have been provided fi 



lifornia, most of them excellent so ft 



<gh oft 



)f date in many particulars, and of the pamphlets and leaflets 



if in order to cover the ground. To ob 



k 



has been prepared. 



these covers is all the information to b 



found in dozens of pamphlets, and very much more besides, all cl 
fed and arranged in such manner that any subject desired can be fc 
with the utmost ease. 



dustries and 



f all Southern California that it is impossi 
isefulness too much, to arrange a guide book 



Angel 



es. 



While this book 



>f 



The aim is to give all in- 



formation necessary for the tourist, to enable him to find, and to h 
him to enjoy the many delights which this region has to offer. 

Since during the Exposition \)ear, no one in Los Angeles, whether tourist 
or permanent resident, will fail to visit the neighboring Exposition Cities, 
and certainly no one who goes to San Diego first will fail to maJ^e at 
least a short trip to Los Angeles, the Metropolis of Southern California; 
it is fitting that San Diego and its Exposition should be included in this 



guide. 



)f the book, which is devoted to Los A 



Iphabetical ordi 



d 



no index is re 



quired. 



H 



former towns which are now a part of th 



Following the Guide proper will be found Special Trips, each of which 
may be made from Los Angeles. In describing the routes of these 
excursions the various towns through which they pass are also included. 

Next comes San Diego and the Panama-California Exposition, followed 
by a treatise on notable hotels of Southern California. 

THE PUBLISHERS 




LOS ANGELES HARBOR 



LOS ANGELES 



^hat which she has not 
and wills not is not 



Year 



by year tourists flock to Los 
Angeles in greater numbers, year by year 
her permanent population increases by 
leaps and bounds, both classes called hither 
by her incomparable climate, her delightful 
situation, between the mountains and the 
sea, her interesting surroundings, the facili- 
ties she affords for amusement and recre- 
ation and by her abundant evidences of 
material prosperity. In all these particu- 
lars Los Angeles is pre-eminent, but there 
is still more of which she has a right to be 
proud — doubly proud because they are 
among the things best worth while, and 
because it is through her own efforts that 
she has attained them; her climate and 
situation she was born with. Her play- 
ground system is among the best in the 
United States; her public schools are ex- 
ceptionally fine; her people have been 
taught the skilful use of books, so that in 
circulation and reference use her public 
library ranks very high; and in an age 
when^ church-going is notably falling off 
and^ in a country where all out-doors is 
calling insistently every Sunday in the 
year, her largest churches are crowded to 
the doors at every service. These things 
mean that Los Angeles is far more than 
just a materially prosperous city, and that 
with all the allurements of Southern Cali- 
fornia at her doors, she takes time for the 
higher things of life. 

One morning in September, 1781, Gov- 
ernor Felipe de Neve, with a band of 
priests and Indian neophytes and eleven 
settlers with their families who were to 
become the pablodores of the new town, 



gation 




set out from San Gabriel Mission to estab- 
lish the Pueblo Nuestra Senora, la Reina 
de Los Angeles. Arriving at the spot 
selected, a cross was set up, the priests 
and neophytes chanted, the banner of Our 
Lady was unfurled by the side of the flag 
of Spain, and the site was named for 
Our Lady, the Queen of the Angels. Lots 
were laid out on three sides of a plaza 
(one side being reserved for a church and 
other public buildings), lands for cultiva- 
tion called suertes, were set apart, an irri- 

ditch from the river, then called 
" Porciuncula, ' ' was planned, and each 
soldier was given two oxen, two mules, two 
mares, two sheep, two goats, two cows, one 
calf, an ass and one hoe. With their 
families the settlers numbered forty-six, 
only two of pure Spanish blood, the rest 
Indian and mulatto. Their houses when 
built were rude adobe structures with flat 
roofs made of reeds covered with as- 
phaltum. 

Their ^ fields were productive with little 
cultivation and what was lacking the 
fertile fields of San Gabriel Mission could 
supply, so for many years the settlers led 
a dolce far niente life. It was said of 
them and of the town, "The people are a 
set of idlers," "the town, founded twenty 
years ago, has made no advancement,'' 1 
"confident that the Gentiles (Indians) are 
working, they pass their days in singing/ 5 
yet the little town grew.' In 1800 the 
population was 315, in 1835 it was made a 
city by the Mexican Government and de- 
clared the capital, but the selection was 
not enforced. Bickerings among Mexican 



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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 




LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



I 














leaders followed for several years, but be- 
tween 1845 and 1847 it was the actual 
capital. When the Mexican war broke out 
the city was torn by factional quarrels, 
but both Mexican factions united to oppose 
the American troops under Commodore 
Stockton and General Fremont. Battles 
were fought in the vicinity with results 
favoring the Americans, and in January, 
1847, Generals Andres Pico and John C. 
Fremont signed articles of peace at Cahu- 
enga. Los Angeles then became an Ameri- 
can city, though in 1846 the American flag 
had been raised by Captain Gillespie. The 
population at that time was 1,250. The 
city received a charter in 1850. In 1860 
the population was 4,300. Of these only 
five hundred were Americans. Los Angeles 
grew slowly for a time, but from 1876, 
when it became connected by the Southern 
Pacific railroad with San Francisco and 
the overland line, its growth was faster, 
and even more rapid after 1885 when con- 
nections were made with the East by the 
Santa Fe system. The period following 
culminated in a land boom when property 
rose to most extraordinary values and all 
of Southern California felt the stimulus. 
As usually happens after such inflation a 
reaction followed, but from that time the 
march has been steadily forward with re- 
markable increase in population since the 
new century set in. In 1900 it was some- 
thing over 100,000, of whom about one-fifth 
were foreign born. In 1910 it was 319,198. 
It is now^ (1914) estimated at 500,000. 
Climate, soil and situation have contributed 
to this wonderful growth, these factors re- 
ferring to neighboring cities and towns as 
well as to Los Angeles, for all Southern 
California has had a remarkable develop- 
ment during the last dozen years. This 
development is not now merely an increase 
in population and property values, but in 
fine buildings and splendid roads, in a 
magnificent water system, in irrigation 
projects, and in more intelligent cultivation 
of the land. All these are solid improve- 
ments^ adding to intrinsic values and, 
taken in connection with a street railway 
system exceptionally complete, an interurban 
electric railway system remarkable for ex- 
tent, an extensive park system, and homes 
surrounded by beautiful grounds, they ex- 
plain the great desirability of Los Angeles 
and vicinity for a sojourn of weeks or 
months, or for a permanent home. The 
question is not whether the new comer 
can find what he wants here; but, in a 
land where mountains, valleys, ocean 



beaches, city blocks and orange groves an 
within a few minutes car-ride from onf 
another, the problem is rather, to choosr 
Nearly every desire of the most comph 
nature can find satisfaction and the ques 
tion to puzzle over is which aim, whicl 
desire, shall be considered paramount 
Does one prefer a high elevation, mountaii 
air, an extended view over cultivates 
valleys and homes buried in almost tropical 
verdure; Altadena, La Canada, Sierra 
Madre, Mount Washington and other hill 
side slopes invite him. Does he desire t( 
till these fertile acres and have a home in 
the midst of walnut, peach, orange oi 
lemon groves, to dwell under his own vine 
and fig tree; again La Canada calls him 
or the Verdugo Hills, San Fernando am 
San Gabriel valleys, Santa Ana, Oran>i 
and other localities reach out for him and 
display their gentle slopes or level plain? 
Does the sea call him; within an hour's 
ride nearly a score of beaches stretch alone; 
the coast with homes ranging from a two 
room cottage to a mansion, each settlement 
with its own peculiar attraction and Jill 
with the comforts of civilization and within 
a short distance from the urban luxuries 
of Los Angeles, with frequent interurban 
electric car service. Does a city home, in- 
cluding the suburban advantages of ex- 
tended grounds, the scent of orange blos- 
soms, rose hedges and tree-bordered ave- 
nues appeal to him; Pasadena, Redlands, 
Riverside await his choice. Or if he is a 
city man whose contentment is not com- 
plete unless he is a part of the bustling 
throng which crowds a city's pavements 
Los Angeles, the metropolis of the South- 
west, beckons with myriad advantages few 
of her sister cities can bring together. Not 
only the usual city advantages of business 
opportunities, fine schools, churches sup- 
plied with the best talent, libraries, clubs, 
theaters, museums, hospitals; but, coupled 
with these, inducements unusual for a city, 
of comfortable all-the-year homes, where 
summer nights are always cool, the hottest 
days not really sultry and the coolest days 
not really cold; where broad, well shaded 
avenues extend in every direction lined 
with homes whose architecture is adapted 
to the climate, each house possessing an 
individuality and standing in grounds 
where nature works every day in the year 
to produce the lawns, trees, shrubs and 
flowers which lend to them all the attrac- 
tions of suburban homes, 
would be discontented 



Surely the man 

in Paradise 
could not satisfy himelf here. 



who 



ALLIGATOR FARM— Adjoining East- 
lake Park is this curious industry, afford- 
ing a novel and interesting exhibition. The 
"farm" is the home of from one to two 
thousand alligators ranging from tiny ones 
about the size of a small lizard to huge 
beasts twenty feet long and more than two 
hundred years old. Visitors are shown 
over the grounds by competent guides, and 
trained alligators are exhibited daily at 
four o'clock. They climb a steep incline 
and " shoot the chutes' f into a small lake. 
They are harnessed to, and draw, a small 
cart and perform various tricks. They are 
raised for sale, but principally for the use 
of their skins, which are manufactured into 
bags, purses, belts, and many other articles 
exhibited in the salesroom. 

AMUSEMENTS— Time can never hang 
heavy on the hands of the visitor in Los 
Angeles, nor can the Angeleno himself ever 
want for amusement. The climate and en- 
virons contribute to his enjoyment while all 
the out-of-door sports, except those de- 
pendent upon snow and ice, flourish the 
year around. 

Baseball — Lovers of baseball can witness 
the great American game daily, except 
Mondays, in Baseball Park at Grand Ave- 
nue and Washington Street. The game be- 
gins at 2 :45. There is also a baseball park 
at Venice. 

Bathing and Swimming — Numerous 
beaches within easy reach of the city offer 
themselves for both surf and still-water 
bathing and the mild climate permits them 
to be enjoyed throughout the year. At the 
Bimini Baths in the city is a splendid 
swimming tank of delightful mineral water, 
constantly renewed; and at Venice, Long 
Beach, Redondo Beach and Ocean Park 
are salt water swimming and plunge baths. 

Coaching — The mountain coach ride at 
Catalina Island in four-in-hand or six-in- 
hand coaches is an experience full of de- 
light for lovers of scenery. From a wind- 
ing, ever-climbing mountain road are ob- 
tained glorious views of sky and hillsides 
and the ever-changing sea. 

Fishing — Catalina Island is a paradise for 

fishermen, a world-famous fishing ground 

for sword-fish and the gamiest fighting 

fish in the world, the leaping tuna, which 

is also caught off Redondo Beach and 
Venice. 

pounds and the season is from May to 
October. Sword-fish weigh from 100 to 350 
pounds and the season is from June to 
December. Several other smaller varieties 



The fish weigh from 80 to 250 



of tuna are to be had, and several varieties 
of sea bass. Black sea bass weighing from 
100 to 450 pounds are caught from April 
to December. The season for white sea 
bass, almost as gamey a fish as the tuna, 
is from March to November. Barracuda, 
whitefish, sheepshead and many others are 
to be had. All the beaches afford fine fish- 
ing grounds, both from the wharves and 
from boats. Sole, halibut, yellowtail, 
mackerel, pompano, yellow-fins, corbina, 
bonita and many small fish are taken. 
Trout are found in the streams of moun- 
tain canyons near Los Angeles. 

Golf and Tennis invite their followers at 
every country club, of which there are a 
number within a short distance of the city, 
the Los Angeles, the Pasadena, the Alta- 
dena, the San Gabriel Valley country clubs 
and the Annandale Golf Club. There are 
also fine links and a club-house on Catalina 
Island. Several of the large tourist hotels 
maintain private links. 

Hunting — Deer, bear, wildcats, mountain 
lions, rabbits, squirrel and quail are found 
in the mountains of Los Angeles County. 
Wild ducks abound on the salt marshes, 
and on Catalina Island mountain goats 
afford sport for the hunter. 

Motoring — Wonderfully smooth automo- 
bile roads extend for miles in every direc- 
tion, to the mountains, to the sea, through 
wild and picturesque scenery, through 
scented orange gToves, through highly 
cultivated and fertile valleys. The charm 
of motoring in Southern California 



something: difficult to describe. 



is 
Not only 

may every variety of scenery be enjoyed, 
but, from the latest developments of our 
complex life of today, one may slip back 
along the years to the old missions, the 
interesting and, when not too painfully 
modernized, beautiful reminders of 
eighteenth century days of the Spanish 
regime on this coast. 

Parks — Amusement parks at several of 
the beach resorts offer attractions for those 
who enjoy scenic railways, roller-coasters, 
"trips to Cloudland" and "shooting the 
chutes. " Parks for rest and recreation, as 
well as play grounds for children, are in 
every quarter of the city. Westlake and 
Eastlake parks, Echo Park and Hollenbeck 
Park contain artificial lakes, furnished with 
row-boats, and the lakes are quite large 
enough for a pleasant boat ride. Near 
Eastlake Park is a zoo, an aviary and an 
aquarium. 



■■ 




LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 











AN ALL-TIIE- YEAR-ROUND SPORT IN LOS ANGEI ES W \TKPS 
rhe y ac„ ts „, m has within bis reach the WQnders Qf Alaska ^ J%™* WATERS ^ 

2VSS a 3a2! fo s? l a r !!i e i- ?r ers fin f this coast is a desirable *** 

wg ground in winter as well as summer. 
Pacific waters, with their Mediterranean 
blue depths and clearness, are themselves 
a delight. All up and down the coast the 
scenery is varied and fascinating while, 
with this coast as a base, the yachtsman 
has within his reach the wonders of Alaska 

and the mysterious islands of the Southern 
beas. 



vous for polo players, and match games 
and tournaments are played every fall and 
winter on the grounds of the Pasadena and 
Riverside Polo clubs, also at the Coronado 

Country Club. 

Theaters-Los Angeles is well supplied 

with heaters, though perhaps the theater 

should no longer be regarded as a place of 

but there can be ^^ ^^ 



amusement. „„ rn ere can oe no aouot 
about vaudeville entertainments, of which 



and the Empress 
There are over a 



the Orpheum, Pantages 

are the principal ones. _ CIC m over a 

hundred moving picture shows in the city 

"TheS" 1 ° rmati ° n See g6neral artie " e 

Yachting-Yachting and motor-boating 
both have their devotees. Los Angeles 
harbor is perhaps the favorite. The club 
house of the South Coast Yacht Club is on 

P^ra C?n a f ^ <*«** ° f ** 
Manama Canal will undoubtedly brin°- 

"earVo^A "?"* /^ t0 th « Arbors 
near Los Angeles. Instead of layino- them 

up for the winter where they^ust bS 

osely eo vered and where ca/e mis be 

taken to keep them free from ice, their 



There are also the trips and excursions ! 
A new one may be taken every day for 
weeks before the visitor has tried Vem 
all and become acquainted with the diversi- 
fied attractions of the surroundings of 
Los Angeles. With this beautiful neighbor- 
's"! C °Z tr X nCl ^ S b ° th -obtains and 
sea, and with all the above sports to be 

enjoyed, not only f or a few weeks or 

LoTAiWt '" the r h ° Ie ^ar thtugh 
if A " 8ele f, m W ri §'ntly claim to be a 

Sr td'f 6 h J aIth - Seek -, the pleasure 

terests' nnrf ^T ln need of new "> 

lerests and recreations. 



ANGELENO HEIGHTS - The 
ground just beyond Echo Pa 
northwestern part of the city 



rk 



high 
in the 



ANGELS/ FLIGHT— A steep incline, 
between Hill and Olive streets, at Third. 
The ascent is so steep that the car is 
built like a stairway, to prevent the pas- 
sengers from falling in a huddle at the 
lower end. The car is drawn by a cable 
which lowers one car as the other rises. 
From the pavilion at the summit there is 
an extensive view over the city and, if it 
is very clear, Catalina Island may be seen 
in the distance. 

ANIMAL FARM— Near Eastlake Park 
is an enclosure containing an interesting 
zoological collection, all the wild animals 
usually found in such places. 

AQUARIA — An interesting aquarium is 
maintained near Eastlake Park. There is 
also one at Venice and one at Avalon. All 
contain rare specimens of marine life and 
are educational as well as curious. 



AQUEDUCT- 

duct is one of 
feats of modern 



The 
the 
times 



Aque- 
engineering 

and one of the 



Owens River 
gr e a t e s t 



largest enterprises ever undertaken by an 
American city. It is built to supply Los 
Angeles with water from the Owens River 
which itself is fed from the everlasting 
snows of Mount Whitney, the highest 
mountain in the United States outside of 
Alaska. The aqueduct is nearly 250 miles 
long, the second longest in the world, and 
has more than forty miles of tunnels. It 
is wholly built of steel and concrete. One 
tunnel, the Great Elizabeth, is five miles 
long, bored through solid rock. Before 
the water was turned in, electric trains 
passed back and forth through it, carry- 
ing supplies. The aqueduct is designed to 
deliver daily into the San Fernando reser- 
voir a minimum of 258,000,000 gallons, but 
500,000,000 gallons can pass through it in 
twenty-four hours. Not only will enough 
water be available for Los Angeles with 
a population of two millions, but there 
will be enough surplus to irrigate all the 
tillable land in the adjoining country. A 
large amount of electric power will also 
be generated, which will be available for 





^^^^■^^^H 



TROUT FISHING IN STREAMS OF MOUNTAIN CANYONS NEAR LOS ANGELES 

A tonic for the tired brain 






/ 







LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 






-;■■■ .--.■■- 










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And 
City 



Behold! A new Light, beaming a Welcome 
of Destiny fulfilled— the G 



far out to 
reat Metropolis of the 



Angeles the Incomparable 



sea, and over the 
(ireat West — Los 




lighting 1 and manufacturing purposes. The 
system is wholly by gravity. The total 
cost of the work will be about $25,000,000. 
It was necessary to spend about $4,000,000 
in preliminary work before the actual 
work on the aqueduct could begin. More 
than 200 miles of mountain roads and 
trails were built, some cut out of solid 
rock; 150 miles of pipe line to carry water 
to employees; a telephone system 250 
miles long was constructed; 140 miles of 
broad-gauge railroad was built across the 
Mojave Desert; three hydro-electric power 
plants were built to furnish power and 
light for camps and tunnels, and a cement 
mill which could furnish 1,250 barrels of 
cement daily. About 1,250,000 barrels of 
cement were used in lining the aqueduct. 
Four thousand men were employed. The 
work was carried on simultaneously at 
forty-five different points. 

AREA OF LOS ANGELES, 121.25 
square miles — This gives plenty of room 
for the population to expand without 
crowding and is one reason for the ex- 
ceptional beauty of the residence sections. 

ARMORY— The State Armory is a hand- 
some building in Exposition Park which 
is on Vermont and Santa Barbara avenues. 

ARROYO SECO (Dry Creek)— The 

channel and upper valley of a "dry river" 
extending: from the Forest Reserve five or 



miles north of 



through 



six mnes nortn or Pasadena, 
Pasadena and South Pasadena, to a junc- 
tion with the Los Angeles River near 
Elysian Park. The present channel, vary- 
ing from fifty to several hundred feet in 
width, has cut itself from the wider valley 
which was once the bed of the stream. 
The channel is dry most of the year, but 

the surface 



occasionally water comes to 
and sometimes it is flooded. 



throughout its length 



The Arroyo 

and 



rugged 



is picturesque 
a short distance north of Pasadena be- 
comes a narrow rocky gorge of 
grandeur called the Devil's Gate. It is 
proposed to convert the borders of the 
Arroyo Seco' into a parkway, connecting 
the Forest Reserve with Elysian Park, in- 
cluding Sycamore Grove on its way. This 
parkway will be about ten and one-half 
miles in length and will form a part of a 
proposed boulevard from the mountains to 
the sea, connecting through Elysian Park 
with the proposed Silver Lake parkway, 
both north to Griffith Park and southwest 
to Santa Monica Boulevard. 




ART COMMISSION 



-Los Angeles was 
the second city in the United States to 
create a Municipal Art Commission, New 
York being the first. There are now fif- 
teen. In the beginning it was merely an 
advisory board created by the city coun- 
cil, but by a later charter it was em- 
powered to reject plans of public build- 
ings, monuments or statuary not conform- 
ing to the standards of the commission. 
The mayor, city engineer, and inspector of 
buildings are ex-officio members. There 
are six others, chosen irrespective of sex. 

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES— The office 
of the Associated Charities of Los Angeles 
is at 232 North Main Street, opposite the 
Post Office Building. The Industrial De- 
partment and Free Labor Bureau are at 
912 Date Street. The council of the 
Associated Charities consists of persons 
appointed or elected by the Los Angeles 
Chamber of Commerce, by the Merchants' 
and Manufacturers' Association, by the 
Charity Conference Committee, from the 
annual members of the Associated Chari- 
ties, together with ex-officio members, the 
mayor, chief of police, city and county 
physicians, chairman of the board of super- 
visors and president of the city council. 



AUDITORIUMS— Los 



Angeles has two 
thus able to take 

the largest size. 

holds ten thou- 

between Hill and 

Auditorium 



Building. 



large auditoriums and is 
care of conventions of 
The Shrine Auditorium 

sand. On Fifth Street, 
Olive streets, is the Temple 

The Auditorium, with its four 
galleries, seats four thousand people. It 
is occupied on Sunday by the Temple 
Baptist Church. During the week the 
room is available for lectures, theaters 
and other large gatherings. There are 
besides in the building two large concert 
rooms, a banquet-room seating one thou- 
sand, and many offices. The Auditorium 
contains one of the largest and finest 
organs in the West, with chimes attach- 
ment. 

AUTOMOBILES — Los Angeles 
nearly heads the list of American 
number of automobiles 



very 
cities 



in 

to 



population. And this 



proportion 
wonder 



in 

is no 

when one considers the boulevards, smooth 
as a floor, which traverse the 
lead out from it in 

with the 



city and 
every direction, to- 
gether with the entrancing and varied 
scenes which make of each 



route a pano- 
rama of beautiful pictures. 

The legal rate for public automobiles or 
taxicabs, subject to change by later ordi- 







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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



I 






1910 
1911 



BANK CLEARINGS 
Our growth 

$811, 377,487 
943,963,357 



L912 

1913 



1,168,941,700 

1, -Ml, 167,980 



nances, is as follows: For seven persons, 
including* chauffeur, $5 per hour for each 
hour where period does not exceed five 
consecutive hours, and $4 per hour after 
first five hours. 

For automobile for five persons, includ- 
ing chauffeur, $4 per hour for each hour 
where the time does not exceed five hours, 
and $3.50 per hour after first five hours. 

For automobile built for two, including 
chauffeur, $3 per hour for five hours and 
$2 for each additional hour. 




AVIATION FIELDS— Dominguez Avia- 
tion Field is near Wilmington. Here there 

is a large grandstand from which thou- 
sands have viewed the world's greatest 
aviators in record flights. Griffith Park 
Aviation Field lies on the north side of 
Griffith Park. 

BANKS — There are in Los Angeles 
thirty-two banks with a capitalization and 
surplus of over $27,000,000. The bank 
clearances for 1913 were $1,211,167,980.18. 
Deposits were $170,468,979.18. They are in 
a solid and prosperous condition, most of 
them in handsome buildings and a large 
number are elegant and luxurious in rooms 
and appointments. Among the most strik- 
ing' are the Hellman banks, the Security 
Trust and Savings Bank, The German 
American, the First National, and the Los 
Angeles Trust and Savings. A feature of 
one of the Hellman banks (the Home In- 
stitution, at Sixth and Main streets) which 
is of great benefit to tourists is its 



night service, enabling them to draw or 
deposit money at unusual hours. The in- 
teriors of the Security Trust and Savings 
and of the First National banks are un- 
usually beautiful. The latter has a charm- 
ing ladies' room and lady tellers for the 
accommodation of its women patrons. Sev- 
eral of the banks maintain Information 
Bureaus (which see). The Los Angeles 
Trust and Savings Bank at Sixth and 
Spring streets has an excellent map, copies 
of which may be had free on request. 

The strength of the Los Angeles banks 
is shown by their success in weathering 
the financial storms of the past twenty 
years and by the rapid increase of their 
bank clearings. 

The following is the authorized state- 
ment of Los Angeles Banks, January 1st, 
1914, as furnished by Mr. J. E. Fishburn, 
president National Bank of California, Los 
Angeles : 

Bank of Italy (Branch) — Deposits, $2,- 
567,004.50; capital, $1,250,000.00; surplus 
and undivided profits, branch of San Fran- 
Total resources, branch of San 



CISCO. 

Francisco. 



Bank of San Pedro — Deposits, $299,- 
127.31; capital, $50,000.00; surplus and un- 
divided profits, $17,369.64. Total resources. 
$371,325.11. 

California Savings Bank — Deposits, $2,- 
533,039.39 ; capital, $300.000.00 ; surplus 
and undivided profits, $70,842.58. Total 
resources, $2,903,881.97. 




NEW INTERIOR HELLMAN BANK, SIXTH AND MAIN STREETS 



M^A 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 











mm* 



I ■ 










1 



BUILDING PERMITS 

Los Angeles whispered "One Million" in 
the early '90s. Later she talked "Millions" 
and kept it up for ten years. Now, she 
shouts in tens of millions and drowns all 
voices except New York, Chicago, Phila- 
delphia and Boston. 




MJh'hlsIS 



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Citizens National Bank — Deposits, $10,- 
036,688.97; capital, $1,500,000.00; surplus 
and undivided profits, $689,384.56. Total 



resources, $13,852,988.60. 



y 



Citizens Savings Bank (Hollywood) — De- 
posits, $266,655.53; capital, $25,000.00; sur- 
plus and undivided profits, $12,502.11. To- 
tal resources, $304,156.64. 

Citizens Savings Bank (San Pedro) — De- 
posits, $303,342.52 ; capital, $25,000.00 ; sur- 
plus and undivided profits, $12,631.35. 
Total resources, $343,632.94. 

Citizens Trust and Savings Bank — De- 
posits, $3,004,785.60; capital, $500,000.00; 
surplus and undivided profits, $115,910.50. 
Total resources, $3,734,203.21. 

Commercial National Bank — Deposits, 
$2,806,221.83; capital, $300,000.00; surplus, 
and undivided profits, $178,001.78. Total 
resources, $3,700,827.99. 

Farmers and Merchants National Bank 
Deposits, $14,514,674.81 ; capital, $1,500,- 
000.00; surplus and undivided profits, $2,- 
069,258.25. Total resources, $19,687,225.32. 



Federal Bank— Deposits, $542,121.10 ; 
capital, $50,000.00; surplus and undivided 
profits, $17,124.78. Total resources, $622,- 
594.69. 

First National Bank of Los Angeles 
Deposits, $17,955,900.47; capital, $1,500,- 
000.00; surplus and undivided profits, $2,- 
427,600.42. Total resources, $24,441,837.96. 

First National Bank (Hollywood)— De- 
posits, $363,434.47; capital, $25,000.00; sur- 
plus and undivided profits, $19,697.08. Total 
resources, $458,057.90. 

First National Bank (San Pedro)— De- 
posits, $253,250.55 ; capital, $50,000.00 ; 
surplus and undivided profits, $21,887.42. 
Total resources, $383,067.67. 

First National Bank (Wilmington) — De- 
posits, $147,124.17; capital, $25,000.00; sur- 
plus and undivided profits, $6,500.00. Total 
resources, $206,463.51. 

German American Trust and Savings 

Bank— Deposits, $19,146,689.50 ; capital, 

$1,000,000.00; surplus and undivided profits, 

$1,173,220.74. Total resources, $21,319,- 

910.24. 



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Year 

No. permits 

Valuation. . 



1900 
1,922 

$2,517,966 



1905 
9,543 

$15,482,067 



Our growth 

1910 

10,738 

$21,684,100 



1911 
12,408 

$23,004,185 



1912 

16,453 

$31,366,357 















1913 

16,442 
$31,641,921 



" 



: 







INTERIOR SECURITY TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK 




STANDARD 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DTEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



Harbor 



















City Savings Bank— 

$191,056.72 ; capital, $25,000.00 ; 
and undivided profits, $11,909.88. 
resources, $228,966.60. 



Deposits, 

surplus 

Total 



Hellman Commercial Trust and Savings 
Bank — Deposits, $5,354,923.61 ; capital, 
$750,000.00; surplus and undivided profits, 
$396,724.62. Total resources, $6,504,505.30. 

Highland Park Bank— Deposits, $248,- 
132.86; capital, $25,000.00; surplus and un- 

Total resources, 



National Bank 



$25,000.00; 
$17,761.46. 



Deposits, 
surplus 

Total 



divided profits, $11,232.24. 
$293,771.64. 

Hollywood 
$662,836.60; capital, 
and undivided profits, 
resources, $730,398.06. 

Hollywood Savings Bank— Deposits, 
$186,139.10 ; capital, $25,000.00 ; surplus 
and undivided profits, $7,560.96. Total re- 
sources, $236,192.00. 

Home Savings Bank— Deposits, $7,043,- 
703.31; capital, $1,000,000.00; surplus and 
undivided profits, $114,500.00. Total re- 
sources, $8,235,000.00. 

International Savings and Exchange 
Bank— Deposits, $2,605,716.69 ; capital, 
$300,000.00; surplus and undivided profits, 
$51,156.18. Total resources, $2,960,872.77. 

Los Angeles Hibernian Savings Bank- 
Deposits, $2,023,126.66; capital, $250,000.00 ; 
surplus and undivided profits, $20,194 23 
Total resources, $2,293,341.89. 

Los Angeles Trust and Savings Bank- 
Deposits, $17,038,825.62; capital, $1,500,- 
000.00; surplus and undivided profits, $1,- 
377,382.03. Total resources, $19,916,207.65 

Merchants National Bank— Deposits $8 - 
046,891.78; capital, $1,000,000.00; surplus 
and undivided profits, $632,192.89. Total 
resources, $10,192,025.63. 

National Bank of California— Deposits 
$4,746,267.12; capital, $500,000.00; surplus 
and undivided profits, $215,786.96. Total 
resources, $6,024,703.48. 

nvi^S? National B ank-Deposits, $3,- 
036147.81; capital, $300,000.00; surplus 
and undivided profits, $231,247 62 Total 
resources, $3,686,732.85. 

Security Trust and Savings Bank 
posits, $41,468,340.81 ; 



De- 



a(\(\nc\ i ' , — ' ^Pital, $1,794, 

7?S'??^ S « UrP T S ^ 1Kl lmdlvided Profits, $1,- 
nj,ao{.6ti. lotal resources, $45,042 30819 

UK 774 9?^ °ii Sa ? Pedro - D eposits,' 
$419,7/4.27; capital, $80,400.00; surplus 

and undivided profits, $8,823.73. Total re- 
sources, $508,998.00. 

Traders Bank— Deposits, $1,190,678.44; 



capital, $250 000 00. surplus and undivided 

profits, $15,396.02. Total 

463,724.46. 



resources, $1 - 



United States National Bank — Deposi 
$1,058,343.97; capital, $200,000.00; surpl,, 
and undivided profits, $97,196.08. Tots 
resources, $1,622,467.10. 

Yokohama Specie Bank, Ltd., (Branch)^ 
Deposits, $408,013.09; capital, branch 
San Francisco; surplus and undivi-lf 
profits, branch of San Francisco. Total i 
sources, $408,595.50. 

BEACHES— Although, strictly speak!, 
none of the beaches belongs to Los Angel 
(San Pedro being- a harbor rather than 
beach), yet they are so closely conned, 
with Los Angeles that they form an inti 
gral part of the city's life. There are 
score or more to be reached by an electri 
car-ride of an hour or two, each witl 
attractions peculiar to itself, each sendbj 
commuters to the city, each drawing, peopli 
from it for rest or pleasure. The seeker fo 
quiet and repose can find what he needs 
the one looking- for gaiety can also bi 
suited. Most of these beaches, with tliei, 
main characteristics, are described undei 
Special Pleasure Trips. 

BIBLE INSTITUTE— it win pay ani 

one interested in the study of the 'Bible, 
the spread of the Gospel and the uplifting 
of his fellow-men, to look into the method* 
and results of this organization. The ob- 
ject of this school is the training oi 
Christian men and women for the World 
Field; but, as adjuncts to its class-work 
the Institute maintains extension class 
work; evening" classes; a correspondence 
school; Bible women's work, employing 
eleven experienced and consecrated worn ji 
in the outlying districts of the city; the 
Jewish work of giving; the Gospel to the 
people of Israel, having access to hundred? 
of homes; the Spanish Mission, working 
among the thousands of Mexicans in the 
city and vicinity and open day and night; 
khop Meetings in railway shops and other 
industrial plants; the Oil-Field Mission, 

and 





It will 






NATATORIUM AND SANITARIUM, BIMINI HOT SPRINGS 

The scene of water sports every Friday evening. Here are the finest swimming tanks in Southern California 



with 



wagon 



consisting of two men 
outfit traversing this needy fielded giv- 
ing to hundreds of men the only Gospel 
privileges they can have; a mission for 
men in the heart of the down-town district; 
a sailors mission and a printing establish- 
ment and a book-room. 

The handsome new reinforced concrete 
building of the Institute on Hope Street, 
between Fifth and Sixth streets, cost three- 
quarters of a million and is an important 

addition to the architectural features of 
the city. 



BIMINI HOT SPRINGS- 

health and pleasure resort is located on 
Vermont Avenue, between First and Third 
streets, Los Angeles. The water of these 
springs, whose curative powers have be- 
come famous, was discovered when boring 
for oil in the year 1900, and there is an 
inexhaustible supply. It was found be- 
neath a hard crust of soda three feet in 
thickness at a depth of 1,750 feet. The 
natural flow is one hundred gallons per 
minute at 104 degrees Farenheit. 

An expert in mineral waters, after 
scientific tests, purchased this spring and 
adjoining acreage. It is a thermal alkaline- 
saline water which carries, in the order 
named, sodium, carbonate, sodium chloride, 
potassium chloride, silica, calcium carbon- 
ate, magnesium carbonate, iron and alumi- 
num. It is also impregnated with petro- 
leum gas and other highly medicinal prop- 
erties which are derived from crude petro- 
leum. It is claimed to be far superior to 
the common sulphur waters in the treat- 
ment of all uric acid conditions, intestinal 
indigestion, catarrhal conditions of the 
alimentary and urinary tracts, obesity, and 
kidney and liver affections. 

In the short space of ten years this 
health resort has become one of the promi- 
nent attractions in bringing thousands of 



This famous health-seekers to Los Angeles. 



During the 

year 1913 over 250,000 baths were given. 
The buildings at present consist of the 
natatorium, containing three large swim- 
ming-pools, five hundred dressing-rooms, 
fifty private tub-baths and seventy rooms 
equipped for the treatment department. 

Adjoining the bath-house proper is the 
Bimini Hotel, where out-of-town patients 
may enjoy all the comforts of a modern 
home. In such a superb location, with 
five lines of the Los Angeles railway cen- 
tering there and only twenty minutes from 
the business center of the city, Bimini 
Hot Springs gives promise of becoming the 
Carlsbad of America. 

BOULEVARDS AND AUTOMOBILE 
ROADS — Smooth, dustless boulevards tra- 
versing the city and extending from it in 
every direction, make of motoring a never- 
tiring pleasure. In the city itself Wilshire 
Boulevard, lined with beautiful homes 
(and crossed by streets almost equally 
beautiful), the Westlake and West Adams 
districts offer drives of unsurpassed urban 
attractions. A tour of Westlake, Sunset, 
Echo, Elysian, Eastlake and Hollenbeck 
parks gives a variety of beautiful park 
scenery, including splendid trees, tropical 
shrubbery, wondrous flowers and shining 
lakes. To Santa Monica, Venice and 







•-•- ** 



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- 





CITY AND COUNTY ROADS 

Four hundred miles of perfect roads 

lure the motorist to a ceaseless 

charm which lurks throughout the 
oiange, the olive, and the eucalyptus 
groves, over awe-inspiring mountain 

langes, into deep canyons, and along 
the seashore of Los Angeles County. 





LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



Ocean Park one may go and return by 
different routes, the longer, scenic route 
passing through the Third Street tunnel to 
Sunset Boulevard, thence through Holly- 
wood on Hollywood Boulevard, through 
Sherman, Beverly Hills and the Soldiers' 
Home near Sawtelle, to Santa Monica and, 
on Ocean Boulevard, parallel to the ocean, 
to Ocean Park and Venice. One may also 
take the shorter route, west on Washington 
Street to Venice. 

The drive to Long Beach is by way of 
Slauson Avenue and Long Beach Boule- 
vard, something* over twentv miles. From 




Long 

tends 

surf. 

miles along 

Another road 
via Inglewood, 
Long Beach via 



something over twenty miles. 
Beach, Ocean Front Boulevard ex- 
five miles along the bluffs over the 
The Beach Drive extends for ten 

the strand close to the shore, 
leads to Redondo Beach 
thence to San Pedro or 
Wilmington. 
North Broadway, Pasadena Avenue and 
Huntington Drive lead into Pasadena, the 
city of roses, orange groves and beautiful 
homes. Altadena, just beyond, shows 
homes scarcely less charming, with a wider 
outlook and beautiful mountain pictures. 

Turning to the right at Alhambra, on 
the way to Pasadena, one passes San 
Gabriel, the old San Gabriel Mission, and 
the home of the Mission Play. A drive 
north from Hollywood, through the Ca- 
huenga Pass, leads into the beautiful San 
Fernando Valley and along a wonderful 
boulevard 170 feet wide, and fifteen miles 
long, level as a floor, bordered by flowers 
and shrubbery and lighted all the way by 
graceful electroliers. Lankershim, Van 
Nuys, Owensmouth, the great dam of the 
new aqueduct, and the old San Fernando 
Mission may be reached by way of this 
boulevard. 

The road winding through the hills and 
valleys of La Canada affords a series of 
beautiful pictures, both near at hand and 
those embracing a distant outlook. Or- 
chards and groves alternating with wilder 
natural scenery stretch out to the moun- 
tains which encompass them. Beautiful 




homes are 



being 



built 



among 



the hills. 



La Canada is reached by the County Good 
Roads Boulevard. 

The Griffith Park Drive, going north on 
Vermont Avenue to Los Feliz and by Los 
Feliz to the river entrance to the park, 
offers, in connection with the park itself, 
much beautiful scenery. The drive of ten 
miles in the park is bordered with ferns 
and wild flowers and shrubbery, with 
beautiful live-oaks on every side, through 



which now and then charming glimpses 
may be had of the San Fernando Valley 
and the distant mountains. Vines drape 
the trees which arch over the road, and 
in places the sun is almost excluded. 

Another beautiful scenic trip is to Look- 
out Mountain, fifteen miles from Los 
Angeles. The way is north through the 
Third Street tunnel to Sunset Boulevard, 
through Hollywood to Laurel Canyon, up 
the canyon for half-a-mile and then a 
winding, zigzag road to the top of the 
mountain. From here spreads out a 
wondrous view, embracing Los Angeles and 
the Pacific Ocean. 

A drive of 160 miles includes Riverside, 
Redlands, San Bernardino, Arrowhead Hot 

back along the Fort Hill 

through Cucamonga. 

Al- 



and 



Springs 

Boulevard, passing 

Claremont, Glendora, Azusa, Duarte, 

cadia and by way of Huntington Drive into 

Los Angeles. 

trip to San Diego 

made by either of 

or the Coast road. 

shorter. The road leads 

and thence through Tus- 

San Juan Capistrano. 



The automobile 
Coronado may be 
routes, the Valley 
latter is somewhat 
first to Santa Ana 
tin and Irvine to 



and 
two 
The 



manv 
(See 

north, 
of 



Here is one of the most beautiful of Cali- 
fornia's old missions, both originally and 
in its half-ruined state. From here the 
road leads to San Luis Rey, another fine 
example of mission architecture, thence to 
Oceanside and along the shore t;o Del Mar 
and San Diego, twenty-eight miles beyond. 
Coronado is close by and reached, by ferry. 
From either Coronado or San Diego 
delightful motor trips can be taken. 
San Diego.) 

A trip to Santa Barbara, 112 miles 
is another possibility, going by way 
Sunset Boulevard, through Hollywood and 
the Cahuenga Pass into the San Fernando 
Valley. After leaving the level valley there 
are two stiff grades before reaching Santa 
Barbara, but both are entirely practicable, 
and signs of the Southern California Auto- 
mobile Club point the way along the route. 
Around Santa Barbara there are innumer- 
able beautiful drives, the Mountain Drive 

being an especially notable one. 

Work is begun on a new county road 
from the mouth of Topanga Canyon, on the 
Santa Monica and Malibu Coast road, 
through the canyon to the summit. With 
the completion of this road, the proposed 
extension, and improvement of the coast 

road, a belt line boulevard matchless for 
beauty and variety of scenery will be 

opened to the automchilists of Southern 






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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 







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California. Starting from the city the 
route will be through suburban Los Angeles 
to Santa Monica, seventeen miles, then 
seven miles of beach drive close to the 
shore, the glorious Pacific on one side and 
the rugged Santa Monica mountains on the 
other. From the mouth of Topanga Canyon 
to Owensmouth is fifteen or twenty miles, 
according to the route finally decided upon. 
The scenery is ruggedly grand most of the 
way. At the summit a splendid vista is 
spread out in all directions. Beyond there 
are wooded stretches where "the road 
follows a brook and winds among giant 
trees. From Owensmouth to Hollywood, 
through Van Nuys is about twenty' miles, 
and from Hollywood to Los Angeles, eight. 
The whole round trip will be about sixty- 
eight miles. 

BOYLE HEIGHTS— That part of the 
| city on a mesa, or table-land, on the east 



= side of the Los Angeles River and lyin 



Angeles. 



O' 



Hollenbeck 



south of East Los 

Park is on Boyle Heights. 

CAFES — See Restaurants. 

CAHUENGA PASS AND VALLEY 

Running northwest from Los Angeles, 
sheltered from the north wind by the 
Santa Monica mountains, is the beautiful 
Cahuenga Valley, practically a frostless 
belt, of which Hollywood, "'the enchanted 
city" is the crowning feature. Cahuenga 
Pass leads from the valley through the 
Santa Monica range into the San Fernan- 



do 



This 



historic ground. 



Valley. xnis is 
Through this pass Father Serra and the 
good padres who followed him must have 
worn a pathway, so many times they trod 
the way between the missions, for the 
Franciscans always walked. After the ex- 
plorers and the founders came settlers 
from Mexico, taking the way of the pass 
into the San Fernando Valley. Later 
the hills above the pass was the meeting 
ground between the contending Californi- 
ans and Americans, and two white pillars 
now mark the spot where the peace com- 
pact was signed by the commandants, 



Fremont and Andres 
after this the United 



Pico. Many years 
States Government 



experimented in the use of camels as 
beasts of burden in what seemed a desert 
country, and curious, . Oriental-looking 
caravans marching through the pass made 
the chance observer rub his eyes and 
wonder if he had been transported to the 
Ultimate East. A fine automobile boule- 
vard now follows this section of the old 
Cainino Real into the valley. 







CENTRAL SQUARE— Next to the 

oldest park in the city, the square bounded 
by Fifth and Sixth streets, Hill and 
Olive. It is a delightful oasis in the 
busiest part of the city's life — a block of 
lawn and beautiful trees, with a cool 
fountain splashing in the center. Benches 
line the walks and they are usually well 
filled. There is an impressive Soldier's 
Monument and a Spanish cannon on the 
northeastern corner. On its eastern border 
are convenience stations. Three of the 
principal churches of the city, St. Paul's 
Pro-Cathedral, the First Methodist and 
Temple Baptist, face the square, also 
California Club Building. 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE— The 

Angeles Chamber of Commerce 

1888. Its objects 



the 



Los 



was 
"to 



founded in 1000. its oDjects are 
foster and encourage commerce; to stimu- 
late home manufactures; to assist in 
securing a market for our products; to 
induce immigration, and the sub-division, 
settlement and cultivation of our lands; 
to assist in the development of the 
material resources of the region; and 
generally to promote the business in- 
terests of Southern California." It does 
all this by means of a permanent exhibit 
of the agricultural and mineral products 
of the State, by exhibits in other cities 
and at Expositions, by daily lectures 
illustrated by beautiful colored lantern 
slides and by the dissemination of printed 
matter relating to the products, resources 
and possibilities of Southern California. 
The Chamber of Commerce Building is a 
seven-story edifice at 122-134 S. Broad- 
way. The second and third floors, attic 
and basement are occupied by the Cham- 
ber for its various activities. Shops and 
offices occupy the rest of the building and 
furnish an income which is paying the 
principal and interest of the bonds issued 
for its erection. 

The exhibit maintained by the Chamber 
is a very fine one, ranging chronologically 
from pro-historic Indian relics down to 
the latest productions of agricultural and 
horticultural skill. There is a collection 
of the minerals found in the State; there 
is an exhibit of crude oils and distillates 
representing the petroleum wealth of the 
State; there are interesting and instructive 
relief mans of the surrounding 



and 



maps 
literature 



relating to the 



country, 
cities and 



counties of the State which is freely dis- 
tributed bv DeoDle who are rendv to 



are ready 
answer any questions pertaining to the 



t '_ 



• 









I 











LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 




exhibits or to the State's resources; and 
there are tempting displays of fruits ; and 
vegetables in bewildering variety, both in 

preserved in tall 
of fruit is aston- 
be found in the 



their natural form and 
glass jars. The variety 
ishing, and all are to 
markets of Los Angeles. 



On the third floor is 



the lecture room, 
to late afternoon 



where, from 9:30 a. m. 
(with a noon intermission) one may listen 
to half-hour talks on different sections of 
the State, given by experts and illustrated 
bv lantern slides which portray the won- 
ders and beautv of California scenery 



in 



great 



beauty 
systems of irrigation, crops 
variety, fields of flowers, and citrus groves 
of Southern California. Each locality 
described has its desirable features and 
peculiar attractions and he is a peculiar 
person who cannot find in some corner of 
California a spot which suits him. 

Perhaps the most interesting section of 
the Chamber of Commerce, both to the 
traveler and to the dweller in Los Angeles, 
is the room devoted to the Coronel collec- 
tion. This being practically a museum, is 
described under the heading MUSEUMS. 
The collection was given by Mrs. Coronel 
to the Chamber of Commerce with the 
proviso that it should remain intact, and 
not be merged into other collections. 

CHAMBER OF MINES AND OILS 

Room 300, Germain Building, 224 South 
Spring Street. A small mining and scien- 
tific library is here, open to the public for 
reference. There is also an exhibit. 

CHINATOWN— North of the old plaza, 
at North Los Angeles and Marchessault 
streets, is Chinatown, a fantastic bit of 
the Orient which furnishes the tourist with 
many interesting sights, both during the 
dav and evening. For the 

is desirable, particularly in 
evening. Unless one is going merely for 
shopping, a guide will add much to the 
pleasure of the visit, since he will have 
access to places not open to everyone, and 
will explain curious customs of the 
Chinese. The Chinese shops are filled 
with attractive and beautiful articles and 
the quaint dresses of the women and 
children are a never-ending source of 
interest. For any festal occasion the 
costumes of men and women are beautiful 
in quality and color and the effect is highly 
decorative. 



guide 



stranger 



a 
the 




LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



CHURCHES— Los Angeles, if unable t Magnolia Avenue Christian Church, 



wrest from Brooklyn its title of the Cit Twenty-fif th Street and Magnolia Avenue, 
of Churches, may truthfully be called Firgt Unitarian, 925 South Flower 
city of church-goers. Surrounded, as th street. 

city is, by every out-door attraction call Seventh Day Adventists, 123 South Dit- 
ing the people every month of the^year, i man street, 
remarkable that almost universall 

the 



on 



is remaiKciuie iu»i fti^^ uuiyci ^, The Second Church of Christ, Scientist, 

throughout the city the congregation h as a strikingly handsome building 
should be so large, in several churches a West Adams Street, near Hoover, 
both services, crowding the audience root The Lutherans, Methodists and Baptists 
to the utmost limit of standing rooii an d Presbyterians have churches for sev- 
Facing Central Square in the busine> e ral different nationalities, Swedish, Ger- 
district of the city are three churches, , man? Norwegian and Danish, and there 
Baptist, a Methodist and an Episcopaliatare numerous missions for Chinese and 
with auditoriums seating respective] other foreigners throughout the city, 
three thousand, about twenty-five hundre 

and eighteen hundred. Go into 



CHURCH 

an .y 01 ANGELS 
of them at a Sunday service, morning «. This 



OF OUR LADY OF THE 

Plaza, or old Mission Church, 
church is not one of the original 



evening, and you will see few or no va<ar. chain of m i ss i on s founded in a wilderness 
cies; if you are a little late the chance t convert and civilize the Indians of the 
are that you will get no seat at alL Wha surrounding country, but one built for the 
has been said of the congregations i accommodation of the settlers in the little 

Central 



almost 



well to 



Square applie Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles which 
the church* was founded in 1781. At first the settlers 

worshipped at San Gabriel, 



though 



the 



The following are some of 
churches, with their addresses: 



the 



the churches on 

equally 
throughout the city. 

Los Angeles possesses the further di . padres ma de the little town a resting place 
tinction, unusual in a non-prohibili. £ the ' r J^T* ^ t ' een t] San Gabriel and 

' , , .i .I ban Fernando. Later the Pueblo was 

town, of having more churches tha giyen itg QWn p]ace of worship> TMs was 

saloons. a temporary chapel on the bank of the 

* eac * m river, near Aliso Street. It was supplied 

by the padres from San Gabriel. As a 

St. Vibiana, the Cathedral of the Romaigreat flood overflowed the site the chapel 
Catholic diocese, Main Street, near Seconcwas moved to higher ground near Buena 

Our Lady of the Angels (R, C), the ol Vista Street. In 1811 the church was 
Mission church, North Main Street at tlibegun on the present site and finished and 
Plaza. Spanish sermon at 9 o'clock ma&dedicated in 1822. The early buildings 

The Synagogue of the Congregatioihave since been very much remodeled and 
B'nai B'rith is on the corner of Nintportions wholly rebuilt, but enough of the 
and Hope streets. early structure remains to render the place 

Temple Baptist Church hold services iiworthy of attention, and in one of the 
the Temple Auditorium at Fifth and Olivoriginal rooms is a most interesting col- 
streets, lection of early mission relics, 

First Methodist, Sixth and Hill streetsan old bench carved by the Mission In- 

Trinity Methodist (South), 847 S. Gramdians; an altar antependium used at the 
Avenue, a big institutional church. first Pontifical 

■^^ church; old 

brought from 

other 



including 



St. John's Church 



(Episcopal), 
Adams and Figueroa streets. 
St. Paul's 



mass 
church 



celebrated in this 



Pro-Cathedral 

523 South Olive Street. 
Christ Church 



(Episcopal man y 

imaginations the 



paintings, some 

Spain and Mexico; and 

which revive to our 



things 



early 



days of the mis- 
sou t] lwe jSions and show us how fertile the padres 

were in resource, how much 



(Episcopal), 
corner of Flower and Twelfth streets. 

Immanuel Presbyterian, Tenth and Fig able to accomplish with 
ueroa streets. within their reach. 



they were 
the few materials 



The mission is in charge of the Mission- 



First Congregational, 837 South Hop^_ 

pons of the Immaculate Heart of 

Congregational, an institn mar ^ an order founded in Spain in 1849. 
tional church which works among foreign The church, which is on North Main 
ers of all nations. Street opposite the old Plaza, serves as the 



Street. 

Bethlehem 



ary 

in stitnM ar y: 



parish church for the Spanish and Mexi- 
cans of the neighborhood. 

CHURCH OF THE ANGELS— This is a 

memorial church situated in the hills north 
of Garvanza, on the border of the old 
Spanish San Rafael Ranch. It is not to 
be confused with the church of Our Lady 
of the Angels described above. It was 
built in 1869 by an English lady as a 
memorial to her husband, Alexander 
Robert Campbell-Johnson. In 1896 it was 
set apart as the Bishop's Chapel. There 
are many objects of interest in the church, 

which are the altar and choir 
stalls, made entirely of the wood of some 
very old olive trees, cut by permission of 
the Fathers from the old San Gabriel 
Mission. Services are conducted in this 



among* 



church on Sundays and holy days. 

CHURCH FEDERATION— The 

gelical churches of the city, over 



Evan- 
two 



hundred in number, are banded together 
in a strong federation, helpful to the 
members of the organization and a power- 
ful factor for good in the city. The 
Federation has pleasant rooms on the 
upper floor of the Wright and Callender 
Building (Fourth and Hill streets), a loung- 
ing and reading room supplied with all 
important religious periodicals, a luncheon 
room, and committee rooms for different 
bands of all Christian churches. The 
rooms are a down-town center for Chris- 
tian work. The pastor of each church 
and one layman for every three hundred 
members form a council which meets once 
a month. 

CITY HALL— The City Hall is an im- 
pressive red sandstone and brick building 



with a 
Broadway, 
streets. It 
annex has 



large 



square tower, on 
between Third and 
built 



South 
Fourth 



was 
added 



to 



in 1888, 
its 



but a later 



capacity, 
inadequate for the business of the 



It 



is 
rapidly 
growing city and some of the departments 

of the city's business are carried on in 
other buildings. The offices of the Board 
of Education are in the Security Building 
at Fifth and Spring streets. A new city 

hall is one of the features designed for 
the Civic Center. 

CIVIC CENTER— In 1907 Mr. Charles 
Mulford Robinson, a celebrated civic archi- 
tect of Rochester. 



plan 



His 



New York, was invited 
to Los Angeles to look over the city and 
plan for its future beautification. 

when completed included a public 
library and art gallery on Normal School 
Hill, with wide approaches up Fifth 




*j 







LOS ANGELES 

The city of homes 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 






















Street; a union railroad station on the 
site of the present Arcade Station and 
widening Fifth Street for an approach 
to it from Los Angeles Street and possibly 
to include the length of Fifth Street to 
Central Square, where it would join the 
widened approach to Normal School Hill; 
a boulevard connecting most of the parks, 
and a project for a civic, or administrative 
center, based on the buildings already 
erected, the just completed Federal Build- 
ing at Temple Street and the junction of 
Spring and Main, and the County Court 
House and annex between Temple Street, 
New High and Broadway. 

CLIMATE — It is a common saying that 
Southern California has but two kinds of 
weather, perfect and unusual. Perhaps 
we may prevent the smile which "un- 
usual" brings to the face of the stranger 
by naming the two sorts, perfect and less 
perfect. Really bad weather cannot exist 
where there are no dull, gray, depressing 
days, almost no thunder storms, no 
cyclones, no snow and ice and slush and 
sleet, no sunstrokes, and where the hottest 
days are invariably relieved by cool nights. 

rain, sometimes, but it is always 

the rainy days are so few. Ac- 

to the United States Weather 

eleven 



There is 
welcome, 
cording 
Bureau, 



only 



times in 



has the 



thirty-six 
below 



years nas ine tnermometer gone 
thirty-two degrees. There are hot days 
in summer; but owing to the dryness of 
the atmosphere they are not as oppressive 
as many degrees less heat in Eastern 
cities, and nearly all summer the cool 
trade winds from the Pacific act as a 
great modifier of the heat. The first rain 
may come any time between the middle 
of September and the middle of November, 
lasting sometimes for several days, or 
parts of days. There will probably follow 
several weeks of uninterrupted sunshine, 
then perhaps another rain. These early 
rains wash the atmosphere clean and leave 
a peculiar crystalline clearness which 
makes mountains and distant objects seem 
wonderfully near. Rain in Los Angeles 
means snow on the mountains, which 
renders them unusually beautiful as they 
stand forth in the transparent atmosphere 
and brilliant sunshine after the rain has 
passed. And the first rains of autumn are 
the harbinger of spring. Immediately the 
hills grow green and flowers are springing 
up and blossoming in all the fields. There 
are on an average during the year 309 
cloudless days, or days where the sun is 
only partly obscured. The mildness of the 



climate permits the most delicate plants 
to flourish in the open air all winter. 
Hedges of callas, of geraniums, of tender 
roses; heliotrope and fuchsias climbing to 
second story windows; date palms and 
banana trees waving their mammoth 
leaves; orange and lemon trees loading 
the air with fragrance, these are all winter 
delights in and about Los Angeles. An- 
other charm of the climate is the variety 
which may be had within a couple of 
hour's journey, the moist, cool air of the 
beaches, the dry warmth of the valleys, 
the tonic mountain air, and even snow 
and ice are within easy reach in winter. 

CLUBS, SOCIETIES AND LODGES— 
As in other cities in this day of organiza- 
tion, Los Angeles abounds in clubs, so- 
cieties and lodges, social, intellectual and 
benevolent. There are clubs enough for 
men, but the number of women's organ- 
izations is remarkable. If any woman in 
Los Angeles does not belong to a club it 
is not because she cannot find one suited 
to her desires and needs. Below are enu- 
merated some of the principal organ- 
izations : 

The Army and Navy League meets the 
second Saturday of each month at 572 
S. Broadway. 

Athletic Club— The Los Angeles Ath- 
letic Club has a fine building splendidly 
equipped at the northeast corner of 
Seventh and Olive streets. The club apart- 
ments, which are among the finest in the 
West, include a large plunge and swim- 
ming tank. 

Automobile Club — The Automobile Club 
of Southern California has rooms at 758 
South Olive Street. 

California Club — An exclusive club 
which has a fine building at the north- 
west corner of Fifth and Hill streets. 

Camera Club — The Los Angeles Camera 
Club meets at 321 S. Hill Street 



every 

Thursday at 8 p. m. Strangers are 
cordially invited. 

City Club — An organization of men and 
women for social purposes and civic bet- 
terment, Room 717, 326 W. Third Street. 
Once a week the members have 



a six 



o 'clock banquet at 



down-town 



a aown-town res- 
taurant, the men coming in directly from 
their business. Speakers at these ban- 
quets elucidate the various subjects in 
which the members are interested. 

Concordia Club 
ing Friday 
Street. 



evenings 



k. Jewish Club, meet- 
at 542 S. Main 













«. 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 













v. 

c 



7. 

c 



Country Clubs — In a region which calls 
to the out-door life with the allurements 
and insistency of the environments of 
Los Angeles, naturally country clubs are 
popular. Where the sun shines more than 
three hundred days in the year they pay 
big returns in health and pleasure on the 
investment. There are half-a-dozen within 
easy reach of Los Angeles, and their golf 
links and tennis courts are in almost daily 
use, winter and summer. 



these 



the Los 



Angeles 



7. 
- 

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"J. 

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V. 

< 






The largest of 
is tne LjOs Angeles Country Club 
at Beverly Hills, with a membership of 
over seven hundred. The Pasadena Country 
Club, San Gabriel Valley Country Club, 
the Altadena Country Club, and Annandale 
Golf Club are all easy of access by the 
interurban electric lines. 

Elks, Masons and Odd Fellows have 
their own buildings, the Elks at 300 S. 
Olive Street, Masonic Temple at Pico and 
Figueroa streets, and the Odd Fellows' 
Building at 220y 2 South Main Street. 





The Grand Army of the Republic meets 

in the Chamber of Commerce Building on 
the first Tuesday of each month. 

Gamut Club — The home of the Gamut 




y 

i 

c 

- 

k 



U 

\ 
'/ 



c 
z 







Club, a musical organization, is at 1044 
South Hope Street. 
Harvard Club of Southern California — 

Room 801 Wright and Callendar Building, 
Fourth and Hill streets. 

Hebrew Club — The Los Angeles Hebrew 
Club meets every first and third Sunday 
at 542 S. Main Street. 

Jonathan Club — One of the principal 
men's social clubs, their handsome rooms 
occupying the eighth and ninth floors of 
the Pacific Electric Buildin 



< 



r 



Main streets. 
Landmarks Club 



O' 



at Sixth and 



This club was incor- 



porated in 1895 "to conserve the missions 
and other historic landmarks of Southern 
Calif ornia. ? ' Many of the historic mis- 



sions 

When 

effect 



were 



fast- 



er umbling 



into 



once unroofed the 



rapid. 



rum. 

disintegrating 

of rain on adobe structures is very 

These mission buildings of the 
early Franciscans in Texas, New Mexico 
and Southern California are by far the 
most impressive and most romantic land- 
marks of the United States, both archi- 
tecturally and historically. To preserve 
them for posterity was a task worthy of 
effort, time and money. The Landmarks 
Club has accomplished wonders with the 
means at its disposal and to its efforts we 
owe the continued existence of many of 
the mission buildings. 



Press Club — Broadway, near Second 
Street. 

Princeton Club of Southern California 

Room 232 Security Building, Fifth and 

Spring streets. 

Sequoya League — An incorporated asso- 
ciation of friends of the Indians, whose 
motto, "To make better Indians,' ' has 
been practically interpreted, To make 
better conditions for Indians. It was 
brought to the attention of thought- 
ful men and women that the condition of 
many of the California Indians was im- 
possibly bad. Many were dragging out 
existence on unirrigated land so hopelessly 
poor that, no matter how industrious they 
were, it was impossible to gain a liveli- 
hood from it. Many were perishing from 
hunger and winter cold in mountain reser- 
vations. As a result of the League's 
efforts a model reservation was secured at 
Pala for the evicted Warner Ranch In- 
dians; and a market was opened for their 
basket industry which has preserved it 
from extinction; and much has been done 
toward restoring to the Indians of South- 
ern California, out of the boundless lands 
that have been taken from them, enough 
tillable land on which they can gain a 
decent living by thrift and labor. 

Society of Colonial Wars — Room 614 
Fernando Building. 



Sons of the Revolution 

eiety. Henne Building, 
Street. 

State Societies 

of State 



-There 
societies, with 



—California So- 
122 West Third 

is a federation 

headquarters at 
957 West Seventh Street. This organiza- 
tion keeps a register of people who are 
here from different States, which enables 
one from any section of the country to 
find the address of others from his home 
State or county. The secretary also keeps 
a list of the State organizations, with the 
time and place of meetings and picnics. 
Newcomers are urged to call at head- 
quarters and register, so that friends may 
find them. 

Union League Club — On the sixth, 
seventh, eighth and ninth floors of the 
Union League Building at Second 
Hill streets. 



and 



University Club — Consolidated Realty 
Building, Sixth and Hill streets. 

Yacht Club— South Coast Yacht 
427 Merchants Trust Building 

O 7 



Club, 
211 South 



Broadway, also at San Pedro. 
Young Men's Christian Association 



This 



organization has a line building at 715-721 
South Hope Street. The object of the 






m. 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 













men. 
room, 



Club house, 1028 
Meets Wed- 



association is the spiritual, intellectual, 
physical and social development of young 

The building contains a reading 
a finely equipped gymnasium, baths, 
an auditorium, and rooms which may be 
secured by members at reasonable rates. 
In the basement is an excellent cafeteria 
which is open every hour of the twenty- 
four. Evening entertainments and lectures 
are provided and educational classes are 
maintained. There is also an employment 
bureau for the benefit of the members, of 
whom there are about four thousand. 
Rooms are open to visitors from 8:30 
a. m. to 10 p. m. 

Young Men's Institute 

East Thirty-fourth Street, 
nesday evenings. 

Nearly every other social and benevolent 
order is well represented by councils and 
lodges of every name and degree. 

Of the women's clubs the Friday Morn- 
ing Club is the oldest. The club house is 
a charming, vine-draped cloistered build- 
ing at 940 Figueroa Street, as attractive 
within as without. It contains a large 
auditorium besides library, parlors, large 
central hall, dining room, etc. But the 
club, now numbering over twelve hundred 
members, has outgrown the building and 
it is planned to erect in the near future a 
larger building on the same site. Regular 

meetings of the club are held every Friday 
morning. 

Next in age is the Los Angeles Ebell 
Club, which was founded in 1894 with the 
object of "individual development, a 
united effort toward harmony, charity, and 
that broad culture which comes through 
service to others.' ' Dr. Adrian Ebell was 
a distinguished German scholar who, 
"realizing woman's limited opportunity 
for mental development, and the necessity 
of fitting her to cope more effectivelv with 
the complex forms of modern life, con- 
ceived the idea of establishing an interna- 
tional academy with headquarters at 
Berlin and tributary chapters in all parts 
of the world, for the object of developing 
feminine mentality along serious and scien- 
tific lines. n 



the 



The first of several chapters 
on the Pacific Coast was the Oakland 
Ebe , organized in 1876. The Los Angeles 
Ebell was modeled upon the same lines 
as this Mother Club. Th 



e 



membership is 
now nearly thirteen hundred. The club 
house at 1719 Figueroa Street was erected 
in 1905. It is a beautiful vine-covered 

central 



cloistered walk leading (Yom the rec« 
tion and dining rooms in the front of \ 
building to the large auditorium in 
fear. Up-stairs are rooms used by 
various sections in their study classes. 

Cosmos Club — Meets the second, four 
and fifth Wednesday afternoons at Eb( 
Club House, 1719 Figueroa Street. 

Daughters of the Confederacy— Rol„ 

E. Lee Chapter meets first Thursday aft 
noons at Ebell Club House. 

Daughters of the American Revolution 
Eschscholtzia Chapter meets first Tuesd 
of each month at Ebell Club House. 

Women's City Club — Meets for lunche 

at 12 noon on Mondays, in Blanchard H; 
235 South Broadway. The luncheon 
followed by speaking on timely 

mainly of civic interest. 

Women's Press Club — The Southe 
California Women's Press Club hai i 
club home in Room 408 Chamber i 



topu 



m 

Commerce Building, 122-134 South Broa 
way. 
Women's Christian Temperance Union 

Headquarters, 301 N. Broadway. 

Young Women's Christian Association 

The administration building of the Yom 
Women's Christian Association is on H 

It is built around 

open court, with balconies opening fri 
the upper stories on the court. The flo 
of the court is occupied with tables of tl 



Street, near Third. 




cafeteria, which is in 
pretty, restful library 

from the 



the basement. 



opens 
office and 



main 
information 



and reading 
hall where 



roc 
tl 




HOME OF THE YOUNG MEN'S 

Containing well-equipped gymnasium, 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

baths, auditoriums and restaurant 



desk. 



There is a Caledonian Club, a Slavonian, 



is 

There ai 
evening, a soci a Swiss, an Italian- American, and a branch 

hour and frequent lectures, also classes : of the Cercle Francaise. Both Native 

Daughters and Native Sons of the Golden 



vesper services every 



various branches. There is a swimmir. 



pool in 
Lessons 



the building 



and a gymnashu: 



West have flourishing* organizations and 



swimming 



am"! 



meet in Native Sons' Hall at 134 West 
Seventeenth Street. 



COASTWISE STEAMSHIP LINES— As 



are given in 
physical culture. At the information des 
a list of suitable boarding places is kep _ _ 

The Marv Andrews Clark Memori;P assen £ ers must S° b ^ steam or electric 
Home (which see) is the boarding: hon cars from Los An & eles to San Pedro > the 



of the Y. W. C. A. 



sailing port of Los Angeles, the stations 
from which to leave are sriven. 



Independent Steamship Company — Office 



There are many societies for those o 
foreign birth, for both men and women. . 

Over-Seas Club— (British) The L 530 South s P nn S Street. Salt Lake R. R. 
Angeles branch meets the first and tliir? tation— steamers for San Francisco once 



Wednesday evenings 
1327 Georgia Street, 



of each month ; in five days. 



Imperial Order Daughters of 

(British). 

at the Friday Morniner 



North Pacific 

South 



pire— 

ter meets 



the Eit 0ffi <*>. 62 

Queen Alexandria Chai Electric 

Qj^sireets — steamers 



Station 



Steamship 

Spring Street, 
at Sixth and 



Company 

Pacific 



Main 



for San Francisco and 



building 



enclosing a 



House, 940 South Figueroa Street the fii« Por tland every Tuesday, also steamers for 

San Francisco, with local stops. 



patio, with Monday of each month at 2.30 



Pacific Coast Steamship Company — Office 
at 540 South Spring Street. Pacific Elec- 
tric Station at Sixth and Main streets — 
for San Francisco and Puget Sound on 
Thursdays; for San Francisco only on 
Sundays; for San Diego, Wednesdays and 
Saturdays. 

Pacific Navigation Company — Office, 611 
South Spring Street. Salt Lake R. R. 
Station. For San Francisco, Sundays, 
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays; for San 
Diego, Thursdays and Saturdays. 

San Francisco and Portland Steamship 
Company — Office, 517 South Spring Street. 
Pacific Electric Station, Sixth and Main 
streets — for San Francisco and Portland 
every five days. 

COLEGROVE— A residence section of 
Los Angeles lying south of Hollywood, and 
north of Melrose Avenue. 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS— In educa- 
tional facilities Los Angeles stands well 
abreast of the best Eastern cities, and in 



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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 




some respects outranks other cities of the 
Pacific Coast. In the city and immediate 
vicinity there are branches of the great 
State University, the University of South- 
ern California with its several depart- 
ments, and several excellent small colleges 
doing splendid work. There are, for boys 
and girls, numerous private schools offer- 
ing varied advantages; business colleges, 
military schools, college-preparatory and 
finishing schools; musical, art, and dra- 
matic schools; and technical schools of 
high rank. The public schools are unsur- 
passed in equipment, in teaching force and 
in the enthusiasm of pupils. 

Occidental College occupies a ninety-acre 
campus at Eagle Rock, a beautiful loca- 
tion which is being rapidly adorned by the 
splendid buildings of "Greater Occidental" 
College. Trees and ornamental shrubs, 
planted in great numbers, are adding to 
the beauty of the place, and when all the 
_ buildings are completed the campus will 
7 be one of the most attractive in the West. 
z Occidental College is a Christian co- 
Z educational college of the liberal arts and 
- natural sciences. 

r Pomona College — This college was in- 
corporated in 1887 by the General Associa- 
Z tion of the Congregational churches of 
t Southern California. Its founders were 
> largely people whose former affiliations 
c had been with New England and its in- 
stitutions, and their desire was to estab- 



: 

r 



lish 



. i 



a Christian College of the New 



England type." The site of the college 
was originally Pomona, but later Clare- 
mont, on the Foothill Boulevard, was made 
the permanent location. The campus com- 
prises one hundred acres. The institution 
is co-educational with an enrollment of 
over five hundred pupils. 

State Normal School — By the sale of the 
former normal school site at Fifth Street 
and Grand Avenue to a syndicate of local 
3apitalists who agree to hold the property 
in trust until such a time as the city can 
purchase it for municipal purposes, the 
sum of $600,000 became available for 
►vork upon the buildings of the new normal 

school. To this the State will probably 
idd whatever sum is needful for carrying 
nit ihe designs for the splendid group of 
lew buildings, ten in number. The present 
;ite is between the city and Hollywood, 
vith a frontage on Vermont Avenue of 



.285 feet. 
)f 



buildings 



Architecturally, the new group 
with their courts, tree- 



courts, 

>ordered approached and sunken gardens 
vill form one of the most imposing in- 




stitutions of its kind in the country. The 
style of architecture is Italian Romanesque 
to be carried out in dark red tapestry 
brick and mosaic work, with tile roofs. All 
corridors, halls and stairways are to be 
of fire-proof materials. The ten buildings 
are to be unsurpassed in equipment and 
will provide for two thousand regular 
normal students and nine hundred training 
school pupils. 

Throop College of Technology— This in- 
stitution is a college of applied sciences 
with the essential humanities. It believes in 
giving to youths all the culture they can 
hold, but that they should first be taught 
to be useful. Throop College believes that 
this mighty empire of the Southwest de- 
mands efficient and trained builders, able 
to convert opportunity into achievement. 
The college was founded to supply this 
demand by the late Amos G. Throop. It 
was incorporatel in 1891 as the Throop 
Polytechnic Institute, the first school of 
manual arts west of Chicago. It aims to 
do for the Pacific Coast what the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology does for 
the Atlantic Coast. Only high school 
graduates of approved standing are ad- 
mitted. The degree of Bachelor of Science 
is given at the end of a four-year course. 
The campus for the group of new build- 
is a large and beautiful grove of 
oaks and orange trees flanked by moun- 
tains, on the southeastern boundaries of 
Pasadena. The legacy of Spanish archi- 
tecture which California received through 
the missions has been drawn upon by the 
architects. Low, long buildings connected 
by sunny arcades are to be carried out in 
modern material, reinforced concrete. 
Pasadena Hall, dedicated in 1910, is the 
central and important feature of this 
group. This building is a fine example of 
Spanish renaissance with a central dome 
to lift it above the plainer mission struc- 
tures which are to surround it. The dome 
is employed for the reference library. 
The whole library contains about 
thousand volumes, mainly scientific. The 
college is broadly Christian in its influ- 
ence, but non-sectarian. 

The University of Southern California 

occupies a handsome group of buildings in 
the southern part of the city on Weslev 
Avenue, between Thirty-fifth and Thirty- 
seventh streets. 



mgs 



Of the 
boys, the 



secondary 
Harvard 



Western Avenue; the _ 

on Huntington 



private schools for 
Military School on 



School 



Drive; the Yale 



VIA 






LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 








































■f. 

c 



u 

'. 

- 



>- 



< 

C 



r 



School at 205-209 North Union Street and 
Urban Military Academy at 800 South 
Alvarado Street are good examples; for 
girls the Girls' Collegiate School (Casa de 
Rosas) at Adams and Hoover streets; the 
Westlake School at 612 South Alvarado 
Street; and Hollywood Outdoor School, 
on Sunset Boulevard and May Avenue; 
and for boys and girls the Los Angeles 
Academy and Maryland School at Ninth 
and Beacon streets, near Westlake Park. 
Among the more important of the 
Catholic schools are St. Vincent's College, 
on Grand Avenue, between Eighteenth and 
Washington; St. Mary's Academy, on 
Slauson and Cypress avenues; Sacred 
Heart School at Sichel and Baldwin 

Immaculate Heart College at 



streets ; 

Hollywood and the Academy 
maculate Heart at West 



of the 
Street 



Inl- 
and 



Kingsley Drive. 

Of the public schools of Los Angeles 
too much cannot be said in their praise. 
The city is in the vanguard of progress 
in educational ideals and offers widely 
diversified vocational training, as well as 
the more conservative school courses. 
There are eight high schools, all offering 
courses leading to the State University, 
and all accredited; but each specializing 
in particular ways and offering induce- 
ments peculiar to itself. A pupil may 
attend whichever one of these high schools 

the advantages he especially de- 
sires. Over twenty per cent, of the gram- 
mar school pupils pass on to the high 



offering 



W 

H 

c 
z 
< 



►J seums. 



schools, a large percentage, the 
elsewhere being only twelve per cent. 



average 



CORONEL COLLECTION 



See Mu- 



COUNTRY CLUBS— See Amusements. 
COUNTY HOSPITAL— See Hospitals. 



COURT 

House 



HOUSE— The 



County Court 
red sandstone 
It stands 



is an impressive 
building handsomely carved. 
Broadway Hill, north of First Street, 
statue of Stephen M. White stands 
the greensward before the building. 



on 
A 

on 



CUSTOM OFFICE 



In the 
the 



Federal 

of 



Building (postofBce) at the junction 
Main and Spring streets and Temple Street. 

EASTLAKE PARK— This park, consist- 
ing of about fifty acres, occupies an angle 
at the junction of Mission Road, Alhambra 
Avenue and East Main Street. It is one 
of the most popular parks in the city, both 
by reason of its own attractions of lawns, 
large shade trees, flowers, lake, pretty 
bridges, provision for children's amuse- 
ment, and because near by are the enter- 
taining and instructive zoo, the aquarium, 
the aviary and the alligator farm. Here 
are the beautiful new conservatories where 
the plants which supply the numerous city 
parks with flowers are propagated, and a 
bewildering number of beautiful blossoms 
are always to be seen. Here are spacious 
picnic grounds with tables under spreading 
trees and swings and playgrounds for 
the children. From the rising ground at 
the eastern end of the park is a wide- 
spread view over the surrounding country. 
The trees which border the walks and 
drives, and shade the lawns, range from 
mountain pine to tropical palm. A fine 
group of date-palms is near the southern 
end of the park, also an avenue lined with 
large fan-palms. Boating on the lake is 
very popular. On Sunday afternoons a 
band furnishes excellent music. 




LOS ANGELES IS FAMED FOR ITS MAGNIFICENT APARTMENT HOUSES WITH THEIR SUPERB 
LOCATIONS. THE BRYSON OVERLOOKING SUNSET PARK IS HEREWITH SHOWN 







-. - ~t 



i • r 



LOS 



ANG 



ELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 












ECHO PARK consists of about thirty 
acres on Lake Shore Avenue, just nortli 
of Temple Street. Two-thirds of the area 
is covered by a winding lake, whose borders 
are fringed by beautiful eucalyptus and 
willow trees. This lake is the largest in 
any of the city parks and divides with 
Hollenbeck Park popularity as a boating 
and canoeing resort. Echo Park Play- 
ground (see Playgrounds) is close by. 

EL CAMINO REAL— The historic high- 
way blazed out by the padres and used 
later by travelers in going from San Diego, 
the southernmost mission, north, through 
all the chain of twenty-two missions to 
Sonoma, the northernmost. The missions 
were about a day's journey apart. Among 
the relics of several of the old mission 

padres, 

of this 

Plaza 



churches are maps made by the 
or by Indians, showing portions 
route. There is one in the old 
Church showing the way from San Gabriel 
to Santa Barbara and in the Los Angeles 
County museum building in 



Park is another showing the 
San Antonio to San Rafael, 
marks Club has traced out the 



Exposition 
route from 
The Land- 



far as possible and marked it by iron poi 
and "Mission bells' ' with signs, statii 
the distance, from the last mission to tl 
next. The name El Camino Real appli, 
to streets in various towns througho 
California, generally speaking, bears no 
lation to the original "King's Highway 

ELYSIAN PARK— This park is in , 
northeastern part of the city, betwi 
North Broadway and Los Feliz Road, 
is next to the largest of the city pai 
and ranks among the largest of tl 
country. It contains over five hundn 
acres of diversified landscape, valleys a 
high-ascending hills, where beautif 
scenery is unfolded as the loftier si 
mits are climbed. Except for the drr 
and the planting of trees, only compai 
tively few acres are under cultivj ti 
These consist mainly of a floral displa 
near the Fremont Gate and flower-dec 
ated terraces on the hillside above tl 
Southern Pacific tracks. There are seve 
miles of fine drives in the park from whit 

beautiful vistas of the surrounding eounti 

are opened to the sight. The 



views 



highway as mountains, snow-capped in winter, smili 




CENTRAL SQUARE, LOS ANGELES 




CONCRETE BRIDGE IN "GOOD ROADS" SYSTEM 



valleys, the near-by city and distant ocean 
are magnificent. The possibilities in the 
further development of Elysian Park are 
very great. It is an important link in the 
proposed Arroyo Seco and Silver Lake 
Parkways, and in the boulevard which is 
to lead through them from the mountains 
to the sea. 

EXCURSIONS— See Special Pleasure 
Trips. 

EXPOSITION PARK— This is the old 
agricultural park, and consists of 117 
acres on Vermont Avenue, between Santa 
Barbara and Santa Monica avenues. It is 
being rapidly improved by the combined 
ffforts of city, county and state. There 
are several fine buildings and others in 
process of erection. The California Expo- 
sition Building is a handsome edifice of 
tapestry brick, laid in patterns with tile 
ornamentation. The offices of the park 
tommission are in this building. The Los 
Angeles County Historical and Art Mu- 
seurn^ is a handsome building constructed 
of similar materials. It consists of a 
central rotunda and two wings, in one of 
which is a natural history collection, and 
m the other an historical collection (see 
Museums). Facing the Museum Building, 
across a wide stretch of lawn, is the State 
Armory. These three buildings are on 
three sides of a quadrangular lawn which 
is to contain a great water basin six 
hundred feet long with a fountain at each 
end. Across the road from the Exposition 
Building is a driving track which is to be 
converted into a stadium. This will be 








encircled by a track within which will be 
a forty-two-acre parade and playground, 
with provision for all forms of athletic 
sports. 

FEDERAL BUILDING— A handsome red 
sandstone building on white granite base, 
at the junction of North Main, Spring, 
New High and Temple streets. It was 
built in 1911 and cost $500,000. The 
ground floor is occupied by the postoffice, 
but the building contains also the United 
States courts, the customs and 
offices. 



revenue 



CHURCHES — See 



FEDERATION OF 

Church Federation. 

FEDERATION OF STATE SOCIETIES 

—See State Societies in Clubs, Societies 
and Lodges. 

FIESTAS — California, with her delight- 
ful climatic conditions, is pre-eminently a 
festival State. Especially is it true that 
in Southern California no month in the 
year need be without its joyous celebra- 
tion. A California Celebrations Committee 
is discussing a series of festivals, starting 
with the San Francisco Portola celebra- 
tion in October and ending the season in 
San Diego, to include the important places 
between. Already the Pasadena Rose 
Tournament on the morning of New Year's 
Day is a well-established custom and thou- 
sands of tourists plan their coming to be 
in time for this charming event. Another 
festival and flower carnival— "La Fiesta 
de Los Angeles "—lasting several days a*t 
Los Angeles has been held for ten years 
in the spring of each year. 



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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



FISHING 

Amusements. 
FORT HILL 

Angeles High 
Bueiia Vista 



See this sub-head under 



The hill on which the Los 

School stands, between 

Street and Grand Avenue, 

The earthworks 



avenues pass 



through 



this 



Temple Street and High, 
of Fort Moore on this hill were constructed 
in 1847 and completed in time for raising 
the flag for the first Fourth of July cele- 
bration of Los Angeles. The fort was 
named in memory of the gallant Captain 
Moore who fell in the battle of San Pas- 
qual, December 6, 1846. 

GARDENA— A thriving little town on 
the "shoe-string" strip between Los An- 
geles and San Pedro. The population is 
about two thousand. It is in a fertile 
valley where the industries of dairying, 
poultry-growing and berry-raising thrive. 
The Gardena Agricultural High School is 

a notable institution. 

GARVANZA— (The wild pea.) The 
northeastern section of Los Angeles, lying 
west of South Pasadena. Pasadena and 
Monte Vista 
section. 

GOLF — See Amusements. 

GRIFFITH PARK— 3015 acres in ex- 
tent, is the second largest municipal park in 
America, being exceeded only by Fairmont 
Park of Philadelphia, whose 3341 acres 
includes several hundred acres of river 
surface. Griffith Park was given to the 
city in 1896 by Griffith J. Griffith. It lies 
north of Los Feliz Avenue, about a mile 
north of the city, with the Los Angeles 
river flowing along its eastern boundary. 
It includes the most varied 
scenery, including mountains, deep canyons 
and river bottom. From Griffith peak, an 
elevation of 1,700 feet near its western 
border, is an extensive view embracing 
three ranges of distant mountains, the 
ocean and twenty small cities and towns. 
Save for automobile roads, bridal trails 
and footpaths, the park is mostly in a 
natural state and will be maintained as 
an example of original Californian land- 
scape. There are forests of native trees 
of large size and most of the shrubs and 
flowers native to Southern California are 
growing here. Elk and deer roam the 
park and a zoological garden with animals 
kept under wild natural conditions. There 
is a public golf 

grounds in 
fresh water 



and rugged 



course 



picnic 
stoves, 

Griffith 
north 



leafy 



t 



convenient 
canyons, with 
and plenty of shade, 
aviation field lies on the 
The beautiful Griffith Park 
drive is described under Boulevards 



Park 
side. 



uniting of Griffith and Elysian parks q 
great "boulevard system is a part of | 
plans for the Arroyo Seco and Silver L 2 
Parkways. El Camino Feliz, or "1 
Happy "Road," is the alluring title p 
posed for the thirty-five mile boulevard 
which the drives through these two par 



* 



and their connecting link, will form 






greater part. 

HACKS— The legal rates for hacks, st 

ject to later ordinances, are as folloi 

For use of hack for the first hour, $2,; 

for each subsequent hour, $1.50; from i 

hotels to railroad station and from railrr. 

station to city hotels, $1.00; for use 

hack one mile, $1.00; when more than 

person, for each one, 50 cents. For 

detention, the same price as above by 

hour. ] 

HALL OF RECORDS— A hanlsoi 
white tile-faced building adjoining 
County Court House, between Broach 
and New High streets, south of Temple, 

HARBOR— See San Pedro. 

HIGHLAND PARK— The high land 
the northeastern part of the city, sod 
of Garvanza and west of South Pasad 
Highland Park is traversed by Monte Vis 
and Pasadena avenues. 

HOLLENBECK PARK is the p! 
ground of Boyle Heights. It consists 
twenty acres at the intersection of 
Fourth and Cummings streets. A 
shaded lawn and 







charming lake 



HOLLYWOOD is the beautiful 
suburban district of Los Angeles 
northwestern part of the 



city. 



e 

AY 

a re 
principal attractions. It is very popu! traverse the suburb and form parts of 
for boating. Sunday afternoon band cc scenic automobile roads leading in every 
certs are attended by thousands. 1 direction. The Cahuenga Pass Boulevard 
Hollenbeck Home for the Aged is witl opens the way into the great San Fer- 
a short distance. na ndo Valley, another leads to Laurel 

scei Canyon, a third winds up Lookout Moun- 
in 'tain to the Inn. Sunset Boulevard, merg- 
^ ing into Hollywood Boulevard, extends 
sheltered on the north by the Santa Monifrom the Plaza in Los Angeles to Beverly 
mountains, up whose gently rising fcHills and the delightful Beverly Hills 
hills climb picturesque villas, draped ^Hotel. Vermont Avenue, on its way 
yines and surrounded by the semi-tropi-.from Griffith Park to the sea, crosses 
gardens which make Hollywood a paradiHollywood near its eastern boundary. 
winter or summer. Being in the frostk The homes of Hollywood range from 
belt of the Cahuenga Valley, orange abungalows to castles, through all types of 
lemon trees, bananas, tree ferns, paksuburban architecture, the Spanish, with 
pomsettias, and tender vines and fkwpatio and cloistered arches, perhaps pre- 
flourish to an unwonted degree, and evedominating. Embowering trees and vines 
home is set in a wilderness of bcanand shrubbery blend them all into a beau- 
Hollywood was platted by Mr. H. H. Vtiful whole. 

cox in 1888. Its name was given by J Hollywood is purely a residence suburb. 
Wilcox by reason of the abundant gro^There are no factories to soil the air with 
of the Toyon berry, or California* hol? moke and there are no saloons; but there 
on the slopes, and in the canyons of < ls ever ^ advantage to the resident in the 
Santa Monica mountains. Miles of bou^ °* churches, schools ( and library. 

by graceful pepper t« bome of the church buildings are very 



HOLLENBECK PARK, EAST FOURTH AND CUMMINGS STREETS 

The playground of Doyle Heights contains twenty acres. The lake is very popular for boating. 
; • Band concerts given every Sunday. 



Carnegie 



Li- 



The yards shaded 



pretty, and the Hollywood 
brary has a charmingly attractive exterior 
with pleasant rooms and well-stocked 
shelves within. Not far away is the 
unique de Longpre villa, the home of the 
famous flower painter and flower lover, the 
late Paul de Longpre — just a stone's throw 
further is a charming arts and crafts shop 
where some of de Longpre 's paintings are 
exhibited. 

^ Hollywood Polytechnic High School con- 
sists^ of a group of beautiful buildings in 
spacious grounds. Not only does it train 
pupils in a wonderful variety of vocations, 
but a supplementary course admits students 
by diploma to the junior class of the State 
University. 

The^ Hollywood Outdoor School for girls 
is a high-class school in a garden of palms 
and tropical trees. The college of the 
Immaculate Heart is newly built at a cost 
of $160,000 and will accommodate two 
hundred girls. The Hollywood Hotel is 
one of the charming Southern California 
hotels which annually draw so many tour- 
ists from the East. It is a handsome 




















LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN IHKGO STANDARD GUIDE 



garden 



The Hollen- 
beautiful 



in 



building with suggestions of mission archi- 
tecture, surrounded by palms, shrubs^ and 
gorgeous flowers. Its ro?° 

famous. ^__ 

HOMES FOR THE AGED 

beck Home for the Aged, 

grounds, is on Bonle Avenue, only a short 

distance from Hollenbeck Park. 

HOSPITALS— Los Angeles is well sup- 
plied with hospitals and sanitariums, both 
public and private, most of them char- 
acterized by general excellence in equip- 
ment and administration, and some oi 
them ranking notably high. Of these the 
o-reat County Hospital is an institution oi 
which Los Angeles is justly proud. With 
the new buildings which have been put up 
within the last few years, and those in 
process of erection, all equipped with the 
latest sanitary and healing devices, it is 
now one of the leading institutions of the 



There are twenty build- 
ones being Class A. 



The grounds 



whole country, 
ings, the principal 
steel framed and fireproof, 
of the hospital are attractive, the rooms 
light and airy and all is made as comfort- 
able and cheerful as possible for the 
patients. From thirty to thirty-five patients 
are admitted daily, or about a thousand a 
month. There are a thousand beds, one 
hundred and twenty-five nurses, nineteen 
internes, a superintendent and two assist- 
ant superintendents. The report of the 
State Board of Charities and Corrections 
states that their committee "found noth- 
ing to criticise and had nothing to sug- 

The hospital is on Mission Road, 
between Griffin and Marengo avenues*. 

California Hospital 

of yellow brick 



gest. 



? > 



—A substantial group 
and wooden buildings, 
standing in handsome grounds which are 
shaded by magnificent palms. The loca- 
tion is at 1414 South Hope Street. 
Good Samaritan Hospital — An impressive 

group of light gray brick buildings stand- 
ing on high terraces above Orange Street, 

at the corner of Witmer. 

Sister's Hospital, on Sunset Boulevard 
and Beaudry Street — a handsome build- 
ing standing on blossom-covered terraces. 



These are 



among 



the 



more important 
hospitals and are all well equipped and 
well managed. A large new Children's 
Hospital near Hollywood is approaching 
completion. 

An active campaign is on foot for a 
Social Service Hospital where the fees 
shall be small enough to bring its services 



within the reach of those of small m« 
V et such that the patient need not e, 
sider hims.lf an object of .chanty, 
considerable sum has been raised for thi 



where tourists H 



(».• 



project. 

HOTELS— A city 
in such numbers every winter has natni 

ally prepared for their accommoda i< 
[ j0 s Angeles has done this so well, b 
keeps so well abreast of t lie annuallj i< 
creasing demand upon her hospitality, tl 
she is now one of the leading cbnvei ti 
citi.-s and can easily take care of LOI ,1 

extra people. 
The following list of hotels is publi 1 

I'm! T 



p lhli 



(Eu.), Corner Fi 



, nl . u 1(1 information of tourists, 
special chapter elsewhere in this 
cation will be found a general treatis 
those of special distinction. 
Alexandria Hotel (Km). Fifth and S] ri 

streets. . 

Angelus Hotel (Eu.), Fourth and Sp 

Alhambra Hotel (Eu.), North Broad 

Alvarado Hotel (Am.), West Si 

Street. 

Auditorium Hotel 

and Olive streets. 

Baltimore Hotel (Am.), Fifth Street 
Los Angele-. 

Hotel Clark (Eu.), Broadway, be! . 

Fourth and Fifth. 

Hotel Congress (Eu.), Eighth and Fl 

streets. 

Hotel Cordova (Eu.), corner Eighth i 
Fisrueroa streets. 

Hotel Fremont (Am.), Fourth and Olr 

streets. 

Gates Hotel (Eu.), Sixth and Figuen 

streets. 

Hayward Hotel (Eu.), corner Sixth 

Spring streets. 
Hollenbeck Hotel 



(Eu.), 



;i 




A CORNER OF THE FAMOUS GRILL OF THE VAN NUYS HOTEL, FOURTH AND MAIN 

STREETS, LOS ANGELES 



Rosslyn Hotel (Eu. and Am.), 443 S. 
Main Street. 

Hotel Sherman (Eu.), 314 West Fourth 
Street. 



Second 

Spring streets. 

Hotel Hollywood (Am.), Hollywood. 

King Edward Hotel (Eu.), Fifth Stn 
between .Main and Los Angeles. 

Lankershim Hotel (Eu.), Broadway 
Seventh Street. 

Hotel Leighton (Am.), West Sixth Sim 
West hike district. 

Natick 



Hotel 
Avenue. 



Stillwell (Eu.), 838 S. Grand 



Van Nuys Hotel (Eu.), Fourth and Main 
streets. 




The Westminster 
Main streets. 



(Eu.), Fourth and 



Of course there are many more excellent 
hotels throughout the city. Only a small 
proportion have been named. 



hotels abound. 



Apartment 
Some of the finest are the 



Street, 



House (Eu.), First at Ma 



New Broadway Hotel (Eu.), 205 Nor 
Broadway. 

Occidental Hotel (Eu.), at 428 S. B 
Street, through to IL'S S. Broadway. 
Hotel Oviatt 



Bryson on Wilshire Boulevard and Ram- 
part Street, the Rampart Apartments on 
Sixth and Rampart streets and the Eng- 
strom at 623 West Fifth Street. 




INFORMATION BUREAUS— In the 

matter of information bureaus the business 



streets. 



(Eu.), Pico and Flow concerns of Los Angeles have provided 



Hotel Pick (Eu.), 833 S. Grand Avenii 



well for the strangers within her gates. 



The Peek-Judah Company, which has of- 
fices in all the Pacific Coast cities, main- 
tains a bureau in Los Angeles at 623 
Spring Street. Here are circulars relating 
to all excursions, railroad and steamboat 
time-tables, and a courteous attendant to 
answer questions and give directions. 

In the Pacific Electric Building, at Sixth 
and Main streets, is a large information 
bureau; there is another at the Hill Street 
station of the Pacific Electric, near Fourth 
Street; one in the Times Building at 
Broadway and First Street; one in the 
Alexandria Hotel, and one in the Examiner 
Building on Broadway; also one in the 
Security Trust and Savings Bank at Fifth 
and Spring streets, one in the German- 
American Bank at Fourth and Sprin 
streets, and one in the Chamber of Corn^ 
merce. 

LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE— Thirty- 
four degrees north latitude and one hun- 
dred and eighteen degrees fifteen minutes 
west longitude. 







































LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 







LEARNED SOCIETIES— The principal 
learned societies of Los Angeles are as 
follows : 

The Historical Society of Southern Cali- 

with rooms in the Los 
Historical and Art 



Angeles 
Museum in 



fornia, 

County 
Exposition Park. 

Los Angeles Society of the Archaeolo- 

de- 



gical Institute of America, which 

voted exclusively to the furthering 
terest in archaeological researches in 

Rome 



and 
400 



is 

of in- 

Pales- 

China. 

Ham- 



tine, Egypt, Greece, 

The office of the society is at 

burger Building. 

The Southern California Academy of 
Sciences, founded in 1891 as the Southern 
California Science Association, and in- 
corporated under its present name in 1902. 
There are nearly two hundred members 
and fellows. It has a library of 2000 
books and pamphlets in room 625 San 
Fernando Building at Fourth Street and 
Main. This is soon to be moved to the 
Historical and Art Museum in Exposition 
Park. 

The Southwest Society — This is the most 
important of Los Angeles' learned socie- 
ties. It was founded in 1903, mainly 
through the efforts of Dr. Charles F. 
Lummis, as a branch of the Archaeological 
Institute of America. During its compara- 
tively short life it has achieved results far 
in advance of similar societies four times 
its own age. It was the first of similar 
societies west of Wisconsin and the first 
to do actual scientific work. It has nearly 
twice as many members as the thirty-one- 
year-old Boston Society and nearly three 
times as many as the twenty-six-year-old 
New York Society. The present member- 
ship is nearly five hundred. 

of the 



The primary 
establish- 



object of the society was the 
ment and maintenance of the Southwest 
Museum for the preservation of historic 
and scientific relics pertaining to the life 
of the Southwest during prehistoric, In- 
dian, Spanish, and early American periods. 
The Southwest Museum was incorporated 
in 1907 (see Museums). The society has 
purchased, and acquired by gift, 
valuable collections. 



Los Angeles' 



EXPOSITION PARK 
greatest playground, flanked by the State Exposition Building, the 

domed County Museum of History, Science and Art 



yearly visited by thousands. Another year 
State Armory and the should see them housed in the beautiful 



museum building on Museum Hill. 





LIBRARIES— The Los Angeles Free 
Public Library is by far the largest in the 
city, though there are many others, techni- 
cal, school and foreign libraries, ranging 
in size from a few score volumes to sev- 
eral thousand. Books before buildings has 
been the policy of the public library. It 
was established in 1872 and became a free 
library in 1891. It now numbers 203,600 
volumes. The library is especially rich in 
the early history of the Southwest and in 
translations of Spanish diaries and reports 
relating to that period. 

In home circulation the library ranks 
third in the United States. It is five per 
volume, or over a million a year. About 
half are distributed from the main library, 
and half from the branches and other dis- 

points at school houses, play- 
and factories. A scientific and 



tributins 1 



grounds 
technical 
cialist is 



department in charge of a spe- 

of the service of the ref- 



a part oi tne service 
erence room, and has proved a gTeat aid 
to artisans, engineers and specialists in all 
branches of pure and applied science. 

The Juvenile section contains over 15,000 
carefully selected volumes for boys and 
girls from the Mother Goose age up. 
Books on practical subjects for boys and 
girls, such as carpentry, electricity, metal- 
working, housekeeping and needlework 
have a surprisingly large circulation. 

In the periodical department 1100 maga- 
zines and newspapers are received, cover- 
ing every department of human interest, 
from poultry and bee journals to the 
Journal of Psychical Research. 

The main library is in the Hamburger 
Building at Eighth Street and Broadway. 
It will soon be moved to new quarters in 
the Metropolitan Building at Fifth and 
Broadway. A public library building is a 
part of the group planned for the improve- 
ment of Normal School Hill. The library 
has forty-one branches and distributing 
points, of which twenty-two have reading 
rooms. Two branches 



are in 



buildings which the library 



Carnegie 



They 



many 
Through the gener- 
osity of the president of the society, Mr. 
M. A. Hamburger, the collections have 
been housed in the Hamburger Building, 
where they have been scientifically classi- 
fied and catalogued, and where they are 000 



owns, 
are at San Pedro and Hollywood. 

County Library — The Los Angeles 
County Free Library is on the tenth floor 
of the Hall of Records, North Broadway 
and Franklin streets. 

Law Libraries— Los Angeles County 
Law Library, seventh floor, Hall of Rec- 
ords, Broadway and 



days, 
to 1. 



volumes ; 
8:30 



Franklin Street— 23,- 
to the public week 



open 
a. m. to 10 p. m. ; Sundays, 9 
There is an Edison dictating ma- 
chine here for the use of lawyers. 




mi , ^f- 



I 



1:» 










LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



POPULATION- OUR GROWTH 

>' ear •■•■/•• ••- 1900 1910 1911 (est.) 

Los Angeles City 102,479 319,198 359,000 

County 170,298 504,131 554,000 

Los Angeles is a race, not a race suicide- 






1912 (est.) 
427.001) 
630,000 



L913 (est.) 

500,01)0 
725.000 



District Court of Appeals Library — On 

the tenth floor of the International Bank 
Building — 6,516 volumes. Open 9 a. m. to 

5 p. m. 

United States Circuit Court Library — 
Tajo Building, 307 West First Street— 207 
volumes. For use of judges and court of- 
ficials only. 

Medical Library — Barlow Medical Li- 
brary, 742 Buena Vista Street— 3,373 vol- 
umes. Two hundred medical journals are 
regularly received, forty of them foreign. 
Free to all professional men and students. 
Open daily, except Sunday and four holi- 
days, from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. 

Southwest Society of the Archaeological 
Institute of America, and Southwest Mu- 
seum, incorporated — At present in the 
Hamburger Building, West Eighth Street 
and Broadway. Future location will be in 
the new Museum Building on Museum Hill, 
Avenue Forty-six. This library covers the 
archaeology and history of California and 
the Southwest. It includes two 






parable collections, the Muni 
Arizoniana, and the 
scientific 



mcorn- 
Library of 
complete historical, 
and philological library of Dr. 
Charles F. Lummis, the founder emeritus 
of the Southwest Museum (which see). 
The Munk Library was collected by Dr. 
J. A. Munk, founder of the Eclectic Col- 
lege of Medicine of Los Angeles. For 
nearly thirty years he counted neither 
time nor cost in his determination to 



gather everything 



relating 



to Arizona . 



Naturally, the library includes also works 
on California and New Mexico as all these 
were once a part of the same territory. 
It numbers some six thousand books, maps, 
monographs, magazines, atlases and news- 
papers. Ethnology, Archaeology, Ornith- 
ology, Geology, Botany, Mining, Forestry, 
all are represented and even poetry and 
fiction. Here is every Arizonian guide 
book, from the earliest published in 1849 
to the latest railroad pamphlet. 

The Lummis Library contains about 5,000 
items, including printed books, scrap-books, 
manuscripts, parchments, pamphlets, and 
autographs. It is the most important col- 
lection of Spanish Americana on the Pa- 
Icific Coast and covers every item of real 
value to the historian pertaining to Cali- 
fornia and the Southwest and countries 
related thereto. 



The most valuable item, 
indeed the most valuable piece of Ameri- 

the Southwest, is a per- 
fect copy of Benavides, the 






cana concerning 



only seven 
While this 



Spanish edition, of which 
copies are known to exist, 
treasure is a part of the Lummis collec- 
tion, together with the historic cruet men- 
tioned by Benavides in this history of 
New Mexico, in the Munk Library, is a 
copy of an almost equally scarce French 
edition, printed a year later, in 1631. 

Modern books on the West are included, 
all enriched by annotations and autograph 
letters. Autographed volumes form an- 
other class of treasures. 

The rooms of the Southwest Society and 
Southwest Museum are open daily from 
2 to 4 



See Clubs, Societies and 



p. m. 
LODGES — 

Lodges. 

LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN— One of Holly- 
wood's natural attractions from which the 
views are magnificent by day or night. 
The vision sweeps a wide expanse of 
ocean, plain, mountain and sky and at 
night the scene is glorified by the myriad 
twinkling, gleaming lights of Los Angeles, 

far below. Attractive 



shining 



winding 



walks and automobile drives lead up the 
mountain to the inn. 

LOS ANGELES' NAME— The names 

bestowed by the early Spaniards when they 
christened a new settlement were uni- 



versally picturesque and usually 
to the American mind often 



Common 



usage 



has shortened 



pious, but 
too long. 

of 



Sig- 



ma ny 

them, but usually the gain in time has 
been at the expense of beauty and 
nificance. Twelve different titles of this 
city have been noted among early lvriters. 
Father Serra called it La Porciuncula 
(the Little Portion) from the river which 
had been so named by Portola's expedition 
in 1769, in honor of the Porciuncula, or 
little chapel of St. Francis in the Church 
of our 
Father 
Senora 
(Town 



Lady of the Angels near Assisi. 

Palou called it Pueblo de Nuestra 

de Los Angeles de Porciuncula 

of our Lady of the Angels of 



original 



Porciuncula). Other titles were El Pueblo 
de Santa Maria de Los Angeles, El Pueblo 
de Razon (Town of the Intelligent), Pueblo 
de Maria Santissima de Los Angeles (Town 
of the Most Holy Mary of the Angels), 
Pueblo de Los Angeles, Pueblo de Nuestra 
Senora de Los Angeles, Pueblo de la 
Reina de Los Angeles (Town of the Queen 
of the Angels), Pueblo de la Reina de 
Los Angeles de Porciuncula, Pueblo de la 
Porciuncula, Nuestra Senora Reina de 
Los Angeles, and Ciudad (City) de la 
Reina de Los Angeles. 







Ii • ■ V I I 



at 






i— t 



rM 



•a 



I 



.OS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANOHLHS-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 












Los Angeles is now the generally ac- 
cepted term. But where the Spaniards 
had twelve variations in nomenclature, 
Americans have twelve in pronunciation, 
"twelve distinct mutilations of the name 
of our city are current within it," Dr. 
Lummis says. Hoping to correct this abuse 
he adds this rhyme: 

"Our Lady 

Would remind you, 
Please! 

Her name is NOT 

"Lost Angie Lees," 
Nor Angie anything whatever! 
She trusts her Friends will be so clever 
To share her fit historic pride, 
The "G" shall not be jellified! 
"0" long, "G" hard, and rhyme with 

"Yes"— 
And all about 

Loce Ang-el-ess." 

LOS ANGELES RAILROAD— Probably 
no city of its size in the United States is 
better served in the matter of street rail- 
ways than Los Angeles. Within the city 
limits are over three hundred and fifty 
miles of single track, all electric. Con- 
ductors are uniformly courteous, ready 
with information, and accustomed to 
answering the questions of strangers. 

MANUFACTURING— There are twenty- 
five hundred manufacturing establishments 
in Los Angeles, which turn out products 
to the value of one hundred million dollars 
annually. The openings for manufacturing 
enterprises are many and varied. Cheap 
fuel from the oil-wells of Southern Cali- 
fornia, cheap power and comparative free- 
dom from labor troubles are advantages 



enjoyed by Los 



Angeles 



manufacturers. 



Their products range from aeroplanes and 
automobiles to x-ray apparatus, yeast and 
zinc. 

MARY ANDREWS CLARK MEMO- 
RIAL HOME— This beautiful building at 
336 Loma Drive was built by Hon. William 
A. Clark as a memorial to his mother, 
Mary Andrews Clark, and given to the 
Young Women's Christian Association as 
a boarding home for "young women who 
work for a living/ ' It is a proviso of 
the gift that it must be self-supporting. 

The home is a striking French chateau- 
like building on a commanding height near 
Crown Hill. 



situation affords mag- 
nificent views in all directions. 



Its 



man 



gold 



MINES AND MINING— Los Angeles i 

the center of a number of rich mineral 
fields of Southern California. Gold am 
borax are the chief products, exclusive oi 
petroleum and asphaltum. Other miner 
products are silver, clay, gypsum, granite 
cement and lime, besides numerous ge: 

In Southern California are found 
varieties of tourmalines, aquamarin 
hyacinths, kunzites, pink beryls, topaz an 
garnets. California tourmalines are especi- 
ally fine. It was near the borders of Los 
Angeles and Ventura counties that 
was first discovered in California, during 
t lie mission era, long before Marshall's 
discovery at Sutter's Mill. Some gold is 
still taken out in the same region. Los 
Angeles is not only the natural h ad- 
quarters for the mining fields of Southern 
California but also for the mining reg oi 
of Lower California. Sonora and Arizona, 
and the rich territory of Southern I t; 
and Nevada has been opened to the w irld 
by the San Pedro, Los Angeles and Sail 
Lake Railway. 

MISSION CHURCH— See Chu rch 
Our Ladv of the Angels. 

Pas ior, 

Missioi 

destined 








MISSION PLAY— What the 
Play is to Oberammergau, the 
Play, by John S. McGroarty, is 
to be to Los Angeles and San Gabriel 
During its second season, 1012-13, it bad 
a continuous run from December to Julj 
with two performances every day in the 
week except Monday. The unique the - ter 

built for this play is in the quaint little 

village of San Gabriel. It is only a forty* 
minute electric car-ride from Los Am 
but the traveler finds that he has 1 * 
carried back 



thrice forty 
when he alights from 



years 
the train 



in time 

and li 

eyes fall on the oft-pictured campanile and 
brown, buttressed walls of San Gal n 
Church, and on the old adobe houses down 
the road, freshly whitewashed, perhaps, 
but whose deep doorways and recessed 
windows testify to their age. 

The Mission Playhouse is just across 
the way from the church, a simple struc- 
ture, harmonious in outline with mission 
architecture. 



King's Highway 

first. 



the attentioi 



Entering the enclosure the 
attracts 
Here, surrounding the playhouse, is 
a succession of historically correct minia- 
ture reproductions of the mission churches, 
the whole chain from San Diego to 
noma. The Mission Play orchestra render? 
sweet music in the playhouse garden be 
fore the play and between the acts. Tin 



So- 




home OF THE MISSION PLAY 

This unique theatre is in the quaint village of San Gabriel, a forty-minute electric car ride from Los Angeles 



bright California sunshine gilds this minia- 
ture Camino Real for the modern throng 
that passes around it, just as in by-gone 
days it glorified for the padres their weary 
marches along the real King's Highway. 
The tolling of the mission bell which hangs 
over the pulpit within calls the people to 
their seats. A brown-robed Franciscan 
mounts the pulpit stairs and announces the 
play, and soon the audience is borne back- 
ward in time to the shores of False Bay 
at San Diego in 1769, and the play has 
begun. We do not watch the scenes; we 
live them, side by side with the padres, 
the neophytes and the early Californians. 

From the "Visions of the Past," so 

the 

at 



difficulties, and to their downfall through 
the covetousness and greed of outsiders, 
but it is by no means wholly sad. Through 
a thousand discouragements, the unwaver- 
ing faith of Father Serra and his associ- 
ates triumphed in the end, and the second 
act shows the missions in the height, of 
their success, 
and 



singing 



which 



Past," 

form 



an 



exquisitely portrayed, 
prologue, to the last pathetic scene 
Capistrano, interest does not flag for 
instant. The play centers around the life 
and character of Father Serra, that strong, 
sweet soul, whose faith, though ^ all un- 
knowing to himself, founded cities, and 
whose spirit, we may believe, still broods 
over the Land of his Desire. From be- 
ginning to the end of the play there is not 
one false note. The scenery is exquisitely 
contrived and brought out, the cast^ in- 
cludes descendants of old Spanish families, 
Mexicans and Indians. The play is full of 
the inevitable pathos which attaches to 
the founding of the missions under infinite 



Indian and Spanish dancing 
depict the lighter side of 
those best days of the missions. 

The educative value of this play is very 
great. The more remotely these days of 
the padres slip into the past, the more 
need that they should be revived to oui 
imaginations, that their 
forgotten by us, nor by 
noble resuscitation, so 
detail, renders a great 
to future generations. 
MOUNTAINS — Two ranges of mountains 
the length of 



lessons may not be 
our children. This 
perfect in historic 
service to this and 



as the 



California, known 
Coast Range 



and 



in 
the 



run 

general 

Sierras. The Coast Range is the more 
broken of the two and in different locali- 
ties the short ranges which form it bear 
different names. Los Angeles is in the 
midst of these broken 
California. To the 
Gabriel mountains; to 
Verdugo range and 
Madres; to the northwest the low Santa 
Monica mountains while the San Rafael 



ranges of Southern 
east are the San 
the north the short 
beyond the Sierra 




LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD fJUIDE 



• 





4 



















Our 



POSTOFFICE RECEIPTS 

Uncle Sam's verdict in the case of Los Aiiudcs vs. the world 

growth— 1909, $1,276,664.07; 1910, $1,476,941.52; 1911, $1,646,601.84 

1912, $1,906,51«.68; 1913, $2,114,049.93 



range stretches further northwest through 
Ventura County. Southeast are the Santa 
Ana mountains and further east the longer 
snow-crowned San Bernardino range. Each 
ran°'e has its lofty peaks, San Antonio, 
c li sl ?espectfully known as "Old Baldy," is 
highest peak of the Sierra Madre 
Two other well-known peaks of 



the 




this° range are Mount Wilson and Mount 
Lowe. These are described under Special 
Pleasure Trips. San Gorgonio is a noted 
peak of the San Bernardino range. 

MUSEUMS— Los Angeles has three^ mu- 
seums of great interest and educational 
value: the Coronel Collection, on the third 
floor of the Chamber of Commerce Build- 
ing, the Museum of History, Science and 
Art in the Los Angeles County Historical 
and Art Museum Building in Exposition 
Park, and the Southwest Museum, at 
present in the Hamburger Building at 
Broadway and Eighth Street. 

Coronel Collection— It was a happy cir- 
cumstance which preserved for Los Angeles 
this collection, a part of which isso inti- 
mately connected with her early history. 

Don Antonio Franco Coronel came to Los 
Angeles in 1834. He was a methodical 
man, educated and possessing a sense of 
historic values. He made collections of 
Toltec, Aztec and later Mexican pottery; 
of Mexican and Indian handicraft; mis- 
sion relics; articles of dress worn by 
Spanish and Mexican men and women of 
the early days in California, such as re- 
osas, serap'es, sombreros, slippers and 
high, carved tortoise-shell combs; house- 
hold furnishings, and many objects illus- 
trative of early times. He had a series 
of paintings made of himself and Ins 
young and beautiful wife, in Mexican cos- 
tumes and enacting the scenes of Mexican 
life which were fast being buried under 
the rapidly growing American life of the 
City of the Angels. He collected, or had 
made, groups of tiny wax figures depicting 
the various household and out-of-door 
activities of the days of the Spanish and 
Mexican regimes. He and his wife made 
a model of the Mission San Luis Rey de 
Francia as it was in the days of its glory. 
That, too, is in the collection, as well as 
painted portraits, daguerreotypes, photo- 
graphs, and autograph letters of great 

interest 

After Don Antonio 's death his wife, fol- 
lowing his wishes, gave the collection to the 
Chamber of Commerce, which has since 
maintained it. It occupies a large room on 



the third floor of their building at 122-134 
South Broadway. 

Museum of History, Science and Art— 

This museum, in the Museum Building in 
Exposition Park, consists of various collec- 
tions which have been, or are to be, 
brought together under one roof, the valu- 
able collections of the Historical Society, 
of the Academy of Sciences, of the Cooper 
Ornithological Society and of the Art 
League of Los Angeles, besides a number 
of private collections. 

The natural history collections are in the 
wing at the left of the central rotunda of 
the Museum Building. Here are birds, 
their nests, and eggs, butterflies, shells, 
etc. In the opposite wing is the historical 
collection. Manv of the articles have been 
loaned by the Native Sons of the Golden 
West. Here are Spanish, Mexican and In- 
dian historical relics, portraits, autographs, 
letters from eminent men, pictures of Los 
Angeles in 1854 and in 1869 and a plan 
of the roads from mission to mission, from 
San Rafael south to San Antonio. Here 
are china, glassware, and other household 
furnishings used in the early Spanish 
homes of Los Angeles; high tortoise-shell 
combs and high-heeled satin slippers which 
adorn sonoras and senoritas of early days, 
and many other interesting articles with 
their histories attached. 

The Southwest Museum— This museum 
was founded by the Southwest Society of 
the Archaeological Institute of America and 
incorporated in December, 1907 "to build 
and maintain in Los Angeles a free public 
Museum of History, Science and Art, for 
the great Southwest, on a scale commensur- 
ate with the community it serves." A 
magnificent site was secured on a hill (now 
called Museum Hill) at the head of Ave- 
nue Forty-six, overlooking Sycamore Grove. 
Plans have been prepared for a splendid 
group of buildings, perfectly adapted to 
the site and to their purpose. A be- 
' quest of $50,000 by the late Mrs. Carrie 
M. Jones made possible the first build- 
to be called the Carrie M. Jones 
Memorial Hall. On November 16, 1912, 
ground was broken for this building by 
Bishop Thomas J. Conaty. Above him 
waved the flag that Fremont flung to the 
breeze on the crest of the Rocky mountains 
in 1846. The daughter of General Fremont 
lowered the flag when the ceremonies were 

over. 

occupancy in 1914 and to it will be re- 
moved the collections and library now, 



ing, 



This building will be ready for 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 






H 



t 



through the generosity of Mr. M. A. Ham- 
burger, occupying rooms in the Hamburger 
Bui Wing. The collections include Indian 
relics and specimens of their varied handi- 
fts* mission relics, many connected with 
, ather Serra; Fremont relics; folk-song 
preserved by phonograph; the Caballeria 
collection of old paintings; the Ingersoll 
Election of steel engravings from^ photo- 
graphs of the most important Spanish and 
^jiei'ican women who figured in the early 
development of the State; fossil remains 
and petrifactions; historical documents; 
and the two great gifts to the Museum 
of Hie Munk Library of Arizoniana and 
the Lunimis library and collections. The 
two libraries have- been described under 
libraries. The remainder of the Lummis 
gift includes paintings by noted artists, 
and valuable historical and anthropological 
collections from Equador, Peru and Bolivia. 
The museum is most fortunate in its 
linguished curator, Mr. Hector Alliot. 

USICAL LOS ANGELES— Los Ange- 
es is justly noted as a musical center. It 
is a rare day in Los Angeles when there 
is not a concert of more or less im- 
portance. Four of the high schools have 
orchestras and in the grade schools there 
tre over 400 pupils playing in school 
rches tras. 

There are a number of adult orchestras 
of which the Los Angeles Symphony 
Orchestra is noteworthy. Los Angeles has 
twenty bands and as many singing clubs 
and chorus societies. There are about 500 
music teachers and over 800 professional 
musicians. Popular priced grand opera 
runs for eight weeks each year in Los 
Angeles. Comic opera for twenty-four 
weeks, and the Chicago Grand Opera Com- 
pany give hero from eight to sixteen per- 
formances each season. Blanchard Hall 
Studio Building at 235 Broadway is de- 
voted exclusively to music, art and science 
and is one of the best equipped buildings 
for the encouragement of music and art in 
the United States. It contains four halls, 
Uanchard Hall with a seating capacity of 
1,000, Symphony Hall with a capacity of 
450, Art Hall, holding 250 and Music Hall, 
holding 150. There are a number of other 
spacious concert halls in the city and sev- 
eral large auditoriums. 

See Periodicals. 



half 



much 



the Union, but nan as mucn again as 
Oklahoma, the second greatest producer. 
Omitting the rest of the United States, 
California produced in 1911 more oil than 
any other country, and if Russia and the 
rest of the United States are omitted, more 
than all the other oil-producing countries 
combined. During 1912 more than 90,000,- 
000 barrels was the yield. All the oil wells 
are in the southern part of the State. 
Petroleum and asphaltum were discovered 
here by the first Spanish settlers. They 
made no use of the former but asphaltum 
was frequently used, after melting, as 
roofing for their adobe houses. Not much 
attempt was made at oil development until 
after the close of the Civil War, but An- 
dres Pico, in the early fifties, refined a 
small amount in the San Fernando Valley. 

In 1892 E. L. Doheny drilled his first 
Avell in the city of Los Angeles. Within 
four years there were 700. There are now 
three times that number. In the north- 
western part of the city beautiful lawns 
and gardens have been dotted thickly by 
oil derricks, averaging sixty-five feet in 
height. The wells were such good pro- 
ducers that it was a great temptation to 
multiply them until that portion of the 
city resembles a curious sort of forest 
composed of cubist trees. It is no longer 
permitted to sink new wells within the 
city limits, but those which are still pro- 
ducing may be operated. A pipe line from 
the Kern County petroleum fields delivers 
oil to loading stations on the breakwater 
of Los Angeles harbor. 

It is this cheap fuel which has stimu- 
lated manufacturing in Southern Cali- 
fornia and having proved its worth it is 
now largely used by Western railroads, 
by the United States Navy, and for smelt- 
ing purposes. 

OLD MISSION CHURCH 

of Our Lady of the Angels. 

OSTRICH FARMS— Two ostrich farms 
in the vicinity of Los Angeles are found 
exceedingly interesting to tourists and are 
visited by many thousands annually. 

The Cawston Ostrich Farm in South 
Pasadena may be seen on the automobile 
trip to Pasadena or on the Pacific Electric 
Old Mission Trolley Trip. It is also an 
easy matter to go there by street car. Ad- 
mission is twenty-five cents. The history 
of this pioneer enterprise from the first 



See Church 



NEWSPAPERS- 
OIL WELLS— The petroleum and as- importation of fifty-two birds from Natal, 



^ — ,_ 

phaltum supply of Southern California is 
enormously abundant. California produces, 
not only more oil than any other State in 



farm 



its 



Africa, in 1»»D to tne "'iarm" in 
present state is most interesting. A ship 
was chartered and especially fitted to bring 









V ■< 












LOS AKGELES-SAK DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS AN<JELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



over this first lot. Eight WeB* 
Most of the present American ostrich 
population is descended from the torty 
four which were safely landed at Galves 
ton, Texas. The Natal Government has 
since imposed an almost prohibitive duty 
upon all ostriches taken from the land 
but Mr. Cawston has since impoJdB 
few wild birds from the Nubian deseit 
At this farm the mated birds build their 

lav their eggs and hatch then 

Incubators are also employed. 

birds are reared elsewhere. 



nests, 



young. 

The young ~^~~ — - „ 

The process of removing the feathers from 
the birds and much other interesting in- 
formation is imparted to visitors by guides 
and attendants. The egg of the ostrich 
weighs three pounds. When hatched the 
birds are about the size of frying chickens 

weidi three hundred 

They 



At full size they 
pounds and stand eight feet high, 
live to about seventy years of age. 

the fastest runners among 

miles an hour 



They 
living 



being 



are 

things, twenty-five miles an 
their usual rate. Their sight is very keen. 
Besides the ostriches there are^ many 
other things of interest here, an aviary of 
rare birds, the show-rooms where are dis- 
played beautiful plumes of every # form 
and color, and a Japanese tea-house in the 
garden where refreshing afternoon tea is 

served. 

The Los Angeles Ostrich Farm is at 3609 
Mission Road, and may be seen on the 
"Seeing Los Angeles" trip of the Pacific 
Electric, or by an ordinary street car-ride. 
Admission twenty-five cents for the ordi- 
nary tourist, but the price of the "Seeing 
Los Angeles" trip includes admission to 
the farm. 

PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILROAD— The 

interurban electric railroads radiating in 
every direction from Los Angeles all be- 
long to the Pacific Electric system. Taken 
together with the system within the city, 
they constitute one of the most complete 
and best equipped electric railway systems 
in the United States. The interurban roads 
aggregate 900 miles of single track. Almost 
all are double track and some have four 
tracks. There are lines to Santa Monica, 
Redondo Beach and San Pedro Harbor by 
two different routes, to all the other 

Pasadena 



to 



Alhambra 
Whittier, 



by two routes, to 

and San Gabriel, 

Azusa, Glendora, 



beaches, 
Altadena, 

Monrovia, 

Sierra Madre, Covina, La Habra, Glendale, 
Burbank, Lankershim, Van Nuys, Fernan- 
do, Owensmouth, Santa Ana and Pomona. 
For all these lines over 6,000 trains are 



leaving on two levels 

On the 



on 



and lunch countej 

news stand 

is another 
Hill 



Street, 




operated daily. The Pacific Electric mj 
tains a club-house for the use of its mei 
with pool and billiard tables, hot and col 
baths and other provision for their conj 
fort and pleasure. The number of m 
thus employed in and about the city 

8,000. x . ... 

The main Paciiie Electric station is 

a large building owned by the companj 

on the corner of Sixth and Main street 
From this building interurban tram ai 

in constant succes 
sion. un me main floor are waitim 
rooms, dining rooms, 

information bureau, 
ticket offices. There 
Electric station 

Fourth. 

PARKS— There are in Los Angela 
twenty-four named parks ranging in siz 
from Griffith Park, 3015 acres, and m 

to the largest municipal park in ft 

country, to some even smaller than tli 
historic Plaza on North Main and Mar 
chessault streets. The most important o 
these parks, besides those mention 
above are Westlake and Eastlake i ir 
Elysian Park, Hollenbeck and Echo part 
Prospect Park, Central Park, Expositio 
Park, Sycamore Grove and Sunset 
South parks. These arc all 
under their respective heads. 

Some of the smaller parks are as 
lows: Dixon Park. Ela Park, E\ 
Park, Marion Park, Occidental. 
James, Terrace and Hazard parks, 
^Vermont Square. In all the park are 
of the city is 3896 acres, including -w 
unnamed triangles at street intersection! 

PERIODICALS— The first newspaper J 

_ - _ , C"l m* 



plant of its kind devoted exclusively 
to" the publication of a newspaper west 

Other 



greles 



7 7 



trip with 



of Chicago. 



important publica- 
tion s~ besides the dailies are: The B'nai 
B'rith Messenger, the Builder and Con- 
tractor, the California Cultivator, the 
California Independent, the California 

the California 



Park. Here 



Outlook, 

Tiieicial Bulletin, 



Corn- 
Little 



West, 
(Ger- 



and 



Out 

Coun- 



Voice, the 

the Graphic, the 

Farms Magazine, the Oil Age, Out 

the Rounder, Sud-California Post 
man), and the West Coast Magazine. 
The editor of Out West is Dr. George 
Wharton James, author of "In 
the Old Missions/' "Ramona's 
try," and many other books of the South- 
west, and lecturer on every phase and 
aspect of California life. 

PICO HEIGHTS— In the western part 
of the city, north of Pico Street and 
west of Vermont Avenue. 

PIGEON FARM— This interesting place 
is one of the sights offered to passengers 
on the Pacific Electric "Seeing Los An- 



va .^ free admission. To 

others the admission is twenty-five cents. 
The "farm" is just north of Elysian 

are one hundred thousand 
pigeons raised for market. It is a won- 
derful sight to see them when fed rise 
in the air in clouds, and the whirring of 
their wings is like the rushing of Q 
tempest. The birds 
of 



consume two 
grain daily, besides barrels of 
bread and other food. 



a 

tons 
stale 



PLAYGROUNDS 



Los 



Angeles 



is 



abreast of the most progressive cities in 
the matter of 



A 



_ „ _ public playgrounds. 

Playground Commission is a part of the 
city government. Seven recreation cen- 
ters are permanent institutions in dif- 
ferent parts of the city and the commis- 
sion manages in addition nine vacation 
centers during the summer, taking 
for this purpose some of the 
grounds. Besides this some of the public 
schools maintain playgrounds with a 
trained teacher. 



over 
school 



an 

dose ihi 




Los Angeles appeared on May 17th, 1.85 



and 
Th 



was called The 




Los Angeles Sta 

ere are now nearly seventy perio< i<4 

published in at least seven different Ian 

besides English. They in 'lml 
and Japanese, German, Freud 

Italian, Spanish and Basque newspaper* 

some of them dailies. The most ini,»>i' 

ant morning 

Los 



guages 

Chinese 



papers are The Times. 

Angeles Tribune and The Los 
geles Examiner; the important 
papers are The Evening Express, 
Evening Herald and The H\ 

The Times is published 

some new building 



i 



Tt 
Ar 



at 



evenin. 
Tt 

Glob; 

own ham 

Street an 
the <™^ dfl 



ening; 

in its 



. e cu First 
Broadway, which replaces mc uu C « 
Btroyed by the dastardly outrage of 
tober 1, 1910, in which twenty-two inno 
cent lives were sacrificed. The Examine 
is published in its own building, the M 








TRAINING CLASS FOR PLAYGROUND TEACHERS-CITY RECREATION CENTER 



iB 












LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 




1 through the kindness of generous 
friends have been supplied with instru- 
ments They have drills and friendly 
tests f or trophies at Inter-Playground 
ield Meets. There are directors for 
loth girls and boys at each ground, some 



■ Five trans-continental 
Angeles : The Sunset 



WADING POOL— ECHO PARK PLAYGROUND 



Violet 



The three older playgrounds are the 

Street grounds at 2017 Violet 
Street; Echo Park grounds at 1620 Belle- 
vue, a part of Echo Park, and the Slau- 
son playground at 5739 Fortuna Street. 
Each of these has a club house, a wading- 
pool, sand courts, swings, seats under 
vine-covered pergolas, trees and flowers. 
The club house of the Slauson ground 
contains a double bowling alley. 

Recreation Center is at 1546 St. John 
Street. There is a club house here also, 
and full equipment for children's sports. 
Hazard and Downey playgrounds were 
opened in 1911. The former consists of 
eleven acres well equipped for out-door 
sports requiring space, with a convenient 
club house for indoor activities. This 
playground has the advantage of adjoin- 
ing twenty-five acres of rolling park 
land. 

The Downey ground consists of three 
acres containing a ball field and play 
apparatus, with a pretty little field house. 



The club houses all eonhiin a snail 



auditorium or 
dressing rooms 



meet ins: room, showers 



* 



and store 



Thev 



rooms. 

are provided with dishes and gas stoves, 
so that refreshments can be served anil 
all of them are centers for neighborhood 
clubs and meetings, young ladies', moth- 
ers ' and parents' clubs, young men's city 
clubs, dramatic, swimming 
clubs, 



and athletic 



cooking, 



sewing 



and 



gymnastic 

classes, boys' bands and orchestras. The 

club houses are also used for social 

dances, properly supervised, and for other 

evening parties, lectures and entertain- 
ments. 

The public library co-operates with the 
playground department in the mainten- 
ance of branch libraries at the Violet 
Street, Slauson, Hazard and Echo Park 
playgrounds and at the Recreation Cen- 
ter. These branch libraries are eagerly 
patronized by both the children and their 
parents. The boys of the different play- 
ground centers have organized brass bands 



RAILROADS 

lines serve Los 
Route of the Southern Pacific, by way 
of El Paso and New Orleans; the Ogden 
Route of the same companv, connecting 



f them 



living in 
Besides 



bungalows 
work 



the 



on 
remises. eesiae« m,** directly con- 
ected with the playgrounds, the commis- 
ion maintains and manages a summer 
amp in the San Gabriel Canyon. The 
Jurpose is to provide a safe place where 
crowing boys and girls may have a com- 
ilete change from city life, with sun- 
shine, fresh air, space and activity. 

PLAZA— The little park, not much over 
-n acre in extent, on Marchessault Street, 

letween North Main and North Los An- 



with the 
Santa Fe 
the Rock 



ment, and 
and Salt 



Lake 



began 



les streets. 



eies Buww. This is the oldest park in 
llie city. It was the geographical center 
if the original grant of six square miles 
Iiade by the Spanish government to the 
Pueblo of Los Angeles. On its western 
boundary the Church of Our Lady of 
llie Angels was built and around it once 
clustered the homes of the Spanish-Cali- 
fornians. Now Chinatown and Sonora 

town fringe its borders. 
PLAZA CHURCH— See Church of Our 

ady of the An 
POINT FIRMIN 



same company, 
Central and Union Pacific; the 
Route by way of Albuquerque; 
Island operating part way over 
the Southern Pacific with its own equip- 

the San Pedro, Los Angeles 

Railroad, which 
operation in 1905, opening up a compara- 
tively unknown section in southern Utah 
and Nevada. The Southern Pacific has 
two lines between Los Angeles and San 
Francisco, one along the coast and the 
other through the San Joaquin Valley. 
The Santa Fe also connects with San 
Francisco by way of Barstow. San Diego 
reached by a Santa Fe line. Alto- 
gether a dozen lines of railway center in 



is 



Los Angeles. 



STATIONS 

stations in 
the Santa 

Salt 



— There are 

Los Angeles, 

Fe and the 



The 



Lake passen- 



gels. 



The southern point 
on the west side of the 
Angeles. A pretty park 
borders the high bluff which forms its 
|w 6 v>. The view of the breakwater, har- 
bor, line of coast and of the ocean be- 
yond is extended and fine. 
POLO — See Amusements. 



f San Pedro, 
harbor of Los 
bord( 
edge. 



RAILROAD 

three railroad 
the Salt Lake, 
Southern Pacific, 
ger station is at First Street and Myers. 
The Santa Fe, on Santa Fe Avenue, be- 
tween First and Second streets; and the 
Southern Pacific station, called the Ar- 
cade Depot, is at Fifth and Central 
streets. A new Union Station on the site 
of the Arcade Depot, with Fifth Street 

make a fine approach, was 

of Mr. Charles 

the 



widened 
of 



one 
Mulford 



to maKe a 
the suggestions 
Robinson for 



beautifying 



city. 

RAILROAD 



TICKET OFFICES— Most 



in the Federal Building 



i 

The main Postoffice is 



POPULATION— Estimated (1914) from of the city ticket offices of the various 

important railroads of the United States 
are on Spring Street, between Fifth and 
Seventh, or on Sixth Street near Spring, 
the majority being near the junction of 

Sixth and Spring. 

Though 



475,000 to 500,000. 
POSTOFFICE 



*xx ^ x-<***x«»* ^u^u^-b (which see), at 
the junction of North Main, Spring and 
Temple streets. General , ~" 1 ~ 



delivery 
from 6 



and 



stamp window hours are from 6 a. m. 
to 12 p. m. There are seventy-three sub- 
stations and branches, some of them be- 
ing in the large department stores. 

PROSPECT PARK— This is one of the 
—aller parks of the city, containing only 
two and eighty-eight hundreds acres. It 
is one of the oldest parks and is filled 
with fine trees. As it is situated on high 
land (Echandia Street, Boyle Heights) it 
affords a fine view of the Sierra Madre 

mountains. 

Libraries. 

Colleges and 



RESIDENTIAL SECTIONS 

charming homes are characteristic of Los 
Angeles generally and are in the majority 
in & many sections of the city, certain 
portions are especially noted. Wilshire 
Boulevard and its cross streets for a few 
blocks on each side are lined with won- 

standing, many 



of 

of them 



PUBLIC LIBRARY— See 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS— See 



Schools. 




derfully beautiful homes, 

them, in spacious grounds, and none 

crowded. The architecture is 
varied, some are very unique, but each 
has its own charm, enhanced by its beau- 

of riotous flowers, velvet 

foliage. The West 



tiful 



setting 
lawns and luxuriant 
Adams District is another choice section. 



mmmm ^—^ m 



^■M 







• ■ '■■'. i 



-M 



KK1 



I ' I 



«1 



vt 



/ 









LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 




Here most of the homes are older and 
the gardens even more beautiful. There 
is nothing of the new-rich about the 
West Adams District. The Westlake Dis- 
trict, surrounding Westlake Park, is an- 
other especially attractive section. Holly- 
wood, now a part of Los Angeles, has 
long been noted for its beautiful homes 
in spacious, beautifully cultivated grounds. 
The hills surrounding the city are dotted 
with handsome places, many of them 
withdrawn from public view. 

RESTAURANTS— It is often said thai 
in no city can one obtain as excellent 
food at as low a price as in Los Angeles, 
and this reputation survives even the 
"high cost of living M clamor. Los An- 
geles with all her thousands of tourists 
is still a city of homes, and restaurant 
life as a form of pleasure is not so prev- 
alent as in some other cities of its size, 
though there is no lack to meet any rea- 
sonable demand. 

One of the best known restaurants in 
Los Angeles is the Cafe Bristol, occupy- 
ing the entire basement of the H. W. 
Hellman Building at Fourth and Spring 

By serving the best the market 
affords at popular prices, by maintaining 
a cabaret show second to none on the 
Pacific Coast, and by giving his own per- 



congregat 



streets. 



sonal supervision to every detail of busy 
ness, William Schneider, its owner, ha 
made the Cafe Bristol the Mecca of fU 
bon vivants and epicures who come 
Southern California. A feeling of cam] 
araderie and good fellowship is in tii 
atmosphere, and the lovers of cafe life! 
among Los Angeles residents 
here regularly. 

Cosmopolitanism is one attractive fea-l 
ture, and each tourist, no matter where liiJ 
home, can find viands to suit his taste. fJ 
Mr. Schneider has managed restaurants in 
all parts of the United States and Europe] 
and requires his chefs to be able to cool 
for all nationalities. | 

Other leading restaurants are Filch sal 
353 South Spring Street, MeKee's ai 
518 South Spring Street, Levy's at 63! 
South Spring Street, the New China Res- 
taurant at 508 South Main Street, the 
Oriental Restaurant nearly opposite, and 
Casa Verdugo, a Spanish restaurant, al 
634-636 South Spring Street. 

Of pleasant luncheon places there is a 
great abundance. All up and down Broad- 
way they present enticing front wind <ws, 
and every hungry shopper or busi 
man or afternoon seeker for "the cup 
that cheers" can find a place adapted to 
his or her desires. Among the pleasant- 



sine- 



The rendezvous of 



INTERIOR CAFE BRISTOL 

tne bon vivants and epicures wl 



1,1 visil Los Angeles 






A 







~J W 



*. 




**-~- 




■■ 



:v 




;\ 



r « t <. 



*«* 






".,. •-' &:. 



y\' 



FH 



r: 






■I HUM b>; . ■ 






K\ t> 4*S 



i 



V * 



c r 









s 



,* 



CLUNE'S AUDITORIUM THEATER 



home of moving pictures, 
office building. The largest 



built of reinforced concrete, including an auditorium seating 4,000 and an 
building devoted to moving pictures in the world, and absolutely fireproof 



st are the Pig'n Whistle at 224 South 

Fosgate 



roadway 
nd Rees 9 



and, further south, 
Mission Restaurant at 



330 



outh Broadway, where Mexican special- 
ties can be obtained in addition to other 



ripe olives, 
mode with 
remarkably 
twentv-five 
large hotels 



ood things; 

hop; 



The 



the 



Chocolate 
addition 



Pinton ; 
Christopher's, where, in 
o the restaurant, a pretty upstairs tea 
ooin is open from 3 to 6; and, on Mer- 
antile Place, between Fifth and Sixth 
ftreets, Broadway and Spring, the charm- 
tag Copper Tea-Kettle, 
pre of two Smith 
lmost all the larsre 



ave very nice 
Pper floors. At 

Pring Street, an 
erved, patronized 

en and women. 

r ^g stores make 
onettes," a choice 



cafes 



the successful ven- 
College 

department stores 
on one of their 



graduates. 



in waxed paper, a handful of. 
a generous piece of pie a la 
coffee, tea or chocolate, a 
good combination for only 
cents. The grill rooms of the 
furnish the choicest meals and are very 
popular. There are cafeterias without 
number, and, one might almost say, with- 
out price. You pass a loaded tray under 
the cashier's eye and find your ticket 
marked nineteen cents. Twenty-nine 
cents will pay for as much as the 
hungriest man can eat and the food is 

Hill 



too. 



Jevne's 

excellent 

largely 

Several 

a feature 



store, 208 
luncheon 



is 
by business 
of the Owl 
of "lunch- 
of sandwiches wrapped 



pay 

man can 
of almost uniform excellence, 
Street is especially the home of the cafe- 
teria, from the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association Building, above Third 
Street, south to Sixth Street. There is 
an excellent cafeteria in the basement of 
the Y. W. C. A. Building and the Young 
Men's Christian Association also main- 



ID 



Tl 



—J 



•'* 








LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



tains one in the building at 715 South 
Hope Street. This is kept open all night. 
There is a vegetarian restaurant on Hill 
Street near Third. 

RETAIL DISTRICT— In general terms, 
this district lies between First and Ninth 
streets, embracing Hill, Broadway, Spring 
and Main streets with the numbered cross 
streets. Hill Street has recently devel- 
oped into a business street and contains 
a number of attractive shops, hotels and 
many cafeterias. Broadway is known as 
the ladies' street, since here are the 
numerous establishments, great and all- 
embracing, or small and choice, which min- 
ister to household and women's wants. 
The shops and large department stores 
are well equipped with stocks* which com- 
pare favorably in quality and in fresh- 
ness of style with the large Eastern 
cities. 

Among several beautiful jewelry stores 
that of Feagans & Co., in the Alexan- 
dria. Hotel Building, is the most note- 
worthy. It presents for the inspection 
of those who love the artistic, a display 
of such magnitude and beauty as is 
rarely presented in any single collection. 
Here are shown the products of the 



world's geniuses, who express themselv es 
in the setting of jewels and the working 
of precious metals. Here are offered, be, 
sides the best in gems, gold and ^ silver 
ware, watches, clocks, society stationery, 
small wares in gold and silver and leather 
—all of the best quality, but so priced as 
to make this beautiful shop really an 
economical place at which to secure arti- 
cles above the ordinary. 

The interior of the store with its lofty, 
sunken panelled ceiling and inset pan. 
elled walls, frescoed and tapestried, its 



lanre 



cut-glass 



electroliers, its -art win. 



dows, and woodwork and display cabinets 
of Circassian walnut remind the observer 
of some stately old salon in the day^ of 
a luxury-loving Louis of France. Visi- 
tors from all parts of the world have 
agreed that this place excels in beauty 
and effectiveness anything they have < ver 
seen in the way of a jewelry store. 

It is the policy of Feagans & Co. to ex- 
press in every way possible a cordial 
spirit of welcome to visitors. Whether 
they buy or not, they are shown every 
courtesy and made to feel that their 
presence is appreciated. By a cordial 
spirit of welcome the firm wishes to en- 
courage the public in the custom of c<>m- 



Situat 



INTERIOR FEAGANS AND COMPANY 
ed in the Alexandria Hotel Building Fifth 



JEWELERS 

and Spring streets 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



■ cr freely to this store just to see and 

^Spring Street is more especially the 
an s street. Here are tailor and men's 
L n ishing establishments; here are most 
f the steamboat and railroad offices and 
'ome of the larger banks. Main Street 
I a bustling thoroughfare of varied in- 
vests carried on by men of half a dozen 
nationalities, Mexican and Spanish names 
being in the majority, as the street goes 
north past the old church and Plaza toward 
Sonoratown. Los Angeles has a note- 
worthy number of handsome bank and 
office buildings scattered through her busi- 
ness streets, among them are the Security 

and Savings Bank at Fifth and 






the First National Bank of Los 



Trust 

Aageles at Seventh and Spring, the Times 
Building on First and Broadway, the 
Walter Story Building, the Los Angeles 
trust and Savings Bank Building, the 
Ijnion Oil Building, the Van Nuys Build- 
ing, the German American Bank Build- 
ins, 



and the H. W. Hellman Building. 




1ST. JAMES PARK — About an acre in 
xtent, situated in a fine residence sec- 
lion just off from Adams Street and a 

block west of Figueroa. The surrounding 
gardens of handsome homes give it the 
Kir of a private park, but it is one of the 
public pleasure grounds of the city. 

SALT LAKE RAILROAD— See Rail- 
toads. 

SANTA FE RAILROAD— See Rail- 



oads. 



SAN PEDRO- 

[Wilmington and 
urchase of a narrow 

with the city, 

with hei 



-By the annexation of 
San Pedro, and by the 

strip of land 



onnect them 

eles became a seaport 

San Pedro. The breakwater 
rotects the harbor cost the Federal 

and 



to 
An- 



Los 

harbor 

which 



was 
and 



gov- 
ten 



rnment over $3,000,000, 

ears in building. It is two 
pighth miles long, two hundred feet 
p, the bottom, twenty feet at the 

nd contains three million tons of stone. 

t its outer end is a lighthouse with 

When 



one- 
wide 
top, 




antern 



outer end is a 
of 142,000 candlepower. 
flie dredging now going on is completed 
pos Angeles will have one of the most 
commodious harbors with twenty-two miles 
pf water frontage. The outer harbor may 
p entered at any time of year without 
f pilot. The entrance is four thousand 
feet wide with thirty to forty-eight feet 



of water at low tide. The channel lead- 
ing from outer to inner harbor is five 
hundred to nine hundred feet wide with a 
depth of thirty-one feet. Both outer 
and inner harbors are now being dredged, 
the former to a minimum of thirty-six 
feet, and the city is building docks and 
wharves to accommodate the largest ves- 
sels. Over 630,000,000 feet of lumber 
came into San Pedro in 1912. With the 
opening of the Panama Canal it is ex- 
pected that Los Angeles harbor will be 
thronged with shipping from all parts of 
the world. At present steamship lines 
are in operation from Los Angeles to San 
Francisco, Portland and Seattle, to Pa- 
nama and the Orient, besides steamboats to 
San Diego and Catalina Island. 

SAN PEDRO PLAZA— Sixth and Bea- 
con streets, San Pedro. A long, narrow 
strip, containing three and three-tenths 
acres, bordering the high bluff which 

overlooks the breakwater and harbor. It 
is prettily ornamented with flowers and 

shrubbery, and seats placed here and 
there afford opportunity to enjoy rest- 
fully the comprehensive view of the ship- 
ping, the harbor and the blue ocean be- 
yond. 

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES— See Col- 
leges and Schools. 

SHOPS AND SHOPPING DISTRICT 

See Retail District. 

SIGHT SEEING AUTOMOBILES— The 

Southern California Sightseeing Company 
opera to special touring cars over special 
routes which are described under Special 
Pleasure Trips. A tourist who takes any 
one of these trips is sure to be so highly 
pleased that he will follow with the rest 
if he has the time. As routes and 
schedules change somewhat from time to 
time, it is best to get their folders from 
any of the hotels, or from the general 
offices of the company, sixth floor. Mi *h- 
Stronff Building, Ninth and Main streets. 



SIGHT SEEING ELECTRIC CAR— See 
Special Pleasure Trips. 



SONORATOWN- 

Plaza and Church 



Angels, is 
to Mexicans 
are old adobe 



a quarter given 



and 



North of the old 
of Our Lady of the 

over wholly 
their homes 

stood 



of 



some 
houses which 



have 



there since the town was young 
times an old adobe is back in 



a 



Some- 
yard 









^ 






» 



K* 



I 



a)S A.NGELES-SAN DLKfiO STANDARD GUIDE 












. 






OUR PARKS 

Four thousand restful park acres greet the hosts who come and „ f , i 

whose semi-tropical trees and eternal "wearing o thHreen" T ,?' C * n ? Uered an ™ llI >' ^ P«* 

>»S ot the gieen ooze health and happiness incessantly 



almost 

ieen *° 



sometimes 



it ha 

white 



out of sight, 

freshened by paint or 
rash as to be hardly recognized, but a 
harp eye will find them. A short (Us- 
ance away is the ancient cemetery where 
any °f tne ear ty Spanish settlers are 
uried. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

ee Railroads. 

SOUTHWEST MUSEUM — See Mu- 

eums. 

STEAMSHIP LINES — See Coastwise 
teamship Lines. 

STEAMSHIP TICKET OFFICES — 

These are practically all on Spring Street 
and mainly in the vicinity of Fifth and 

ixth. 



PARK 



SOUTH 

ue and Fifty-first 
bontains eighteen 



On South Park Ave- 

Street. This 

and five-tenths 



park 

acres. 



A mag- 
one of 



lit is a favorite place for picnics. 
Eiflcent double row of palms is 
its distinctive features. 

SUNSET PARK— On Sixth Street and 
Benton Boulevard. This is one of the 
(newer parks of the city, containing six- 
een and sixty-five hundredths acres. It 
promises to be one of the most delightful 
Jones. Like Sycamore Grove, Eastlake and 
South Parks, it has two fine tennis courts. 



SYCAMORE GROVE 



On 



ranging 



Pasadena 
[Avenue and Avenue Fortv-seven. It con- 
tains nearly twenty acres and is the fa- 
vorite picnic park of the city. Every week 
a dozen or more picnics are held here 

in numbers from fifty to five 
hundred. Giant sycamores have inspired 
its name. Numerous water features, fed 
from the stream of the Arroyo Seco, add 
to its attractiveness. Svcamore Grove 
will form an entrance to the proposed 
parkway which is to extend through the 
Arroyo to Pasadena and on to the moun- 
tains of the National Park Reserve. This 
will be one of the finest park drives in 
the country. 

TAXICABS— See Automobiles. 

THEATERS — Los Angeles is known as 
the theater city, where first-class dramatic 

talent is enthusiastically welcomed and 
[where 



is enthusiastically 

the drama in general is liberally 



There are twenty 



manage- 



There are forty establishments in 
the city for the manufacture of moving 
Picture films. 



The principal theaters of the city are 
fhe^ Morosco New Theater, Hamburger's 
Majestic, the Burbank, the Lyceum, the 
Republic, Mason's Opera House, the Cen- 
tury and Auditorium. The first five 
named are virtually under the 
nient of Morosco. The Morosco New 
Theater is the house of the Morosco Pro- 
ducing Company, a stock company which 
brings out new plays. Mason's Opera 
Eouse produces only most notable plays. 
It is under the Frohman management. 

The Orpheum is the home of the best 
vaudeville. Other good houses are the 
Hippodrome, Pantages and the Empress. 

The ureal Auditorium Theater on Fifth 

Street, between Olive and Hill, with a 

seating capacity of 4,001), is now the home 

of CI une's Moving Pictures. It is the 

largesl building of its kind devoted ex- 
clusively to the prod ut*t ion of high-class 

moving pictures in the world. 

Clime's photo plays, Tally's and Mo- 
zart 's are among the best of the moving 1 



i» 



picture shows. 

A movement among manv of the lovers 
of drama of the city resulted in the build- 
ing of a Little Theater, somewhat after 
the plan of the Little Theater of New 

York. It is used largely for the produc- 
tion of such serious, intellectual plays as 

do not always appeal to the general public. 
The Mission Play is a peculiar feature 
of Los Angeles, and a great attraction. 
It presents a fascinating drama founded 
cii early Mission days and is performed 
very afternoon and evening (except Mon- 
days) from December to July, in its own 
playhouse at the Mission San Gabriel, six 
miles away. (See Mission Play.) 

UNIVERSITY PARK— The northwest- 
ern part of Los 
Pasadena. 



Angeles, west of South 



VALLEYS 



Surrounded by broken 



Los Angeles is. 



ranges of mountains as 
it follows that valleys are also numer- 
ous in the vicinity, ranging in size from 
small depressions to the wide, fertile 
levels of San Gabriel and San Fernando 

valleys. 



atronized. Several excellent stock thea- 
ters are maintained. 

theaters, and a hundred moving picture south 
shows. 



Antelope Valley embraces about one- 
fourth of Los Angeles County directly 

of the Kern County line. It in- 
cludes the western part of the Mojave 

With water the land is very pro- 
settled 



Desert. 



luctive and it is 



being rapidly 









m^ 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



an 



Almonds are raised in this 



r 








X 







n 



by 

l,y 

render the climate of the 



[alley 
ftmed 



man 



Bll d developed 

valley in great abundance. 

Cahuenga Valley runs west from Los 
o-eles and is sheltered on the north 
the" Santa Monica mountains which, 
their protection 

practically frostless. Hollywood, 

for its beautiful homes, is called 
l\ ]e Pride of the Valley. Colegrove, Sher- 
i Sawtelle, Beverly Hills and Brent- 
wood are also in this region. (See Ca- 

huon i Pass). 

Eagle Rock Valley lies north, or a lit- 
tle northeast of Los Angeles, between 
Pasadena and Glendale. Here is the pretty 
little town of Eagle Rock, on the out- 
skirts of which are the beautiful new 
buildings of Occidental College. 

La Habra Valley is east of Los Angeles, 
and a little south, in the Puente Hills. 
W h i ttier, a thriving town of 7,000 people, 
the at of the Friend's College and of a 
State Reform School, is in this valley. 

La Canada is five miles north of Pasa- 



and about 
The word 



three 



miles from Glen- 
wide I 




eria, 
dale, xne word means a wide canyon. 

his is one of the most picturesque spots 
in Southern California. The average ele- 
vation is fifteen hundred feet. 
Los Nietos Valley is southeast of Los 
ngeles, a fertile, well watered section. 
Pomona Valley adjoins San Gabriel Val- 
y on the east, the chief town is Pomona, 
rapidly growing city with a population 



of nearly 15,000. Pomona is surrounded 
in every direction by orchards of eitru 
fruits, apricots, peaches, prunes and olives. 
San Fernando Valley is northwest o 

Los Angeles, lying between the Sierra 
Madre and Santa Monica mountains, a 
broad, level, wonderfully fertile plain 
comprising about 120,000 acres, which has 
been found to be especially adapted 1 
peaches, though citrus fruits flourish here 
also. There have been wonderful devel- 
opments in this valley within the last few 
years. New towns have sprung up almost 
over night, and old towns have taken on 

new life. 

The new San Fernando electric line — 
the opening of great asphalt boulevard- 
Connecting with Los Angeles — the coming 
of Owens River water — the swift commer- 
cial awakening of historic San Fernando 
— the extreme fertility of the soil and 
strikingly low prices of acreage — are con- 
ditions that must precipitate a veritable 

rush for San Fernando Mission lands. 

The extension of the Pacific Electric 
Railroad system to the western end of 
the valley, where the new town of Owens- 
mouth is situated, the extension of elec- 
tric light service through the valley, the 
planting of orchards where once wen 
barley fields are part of recent improve- 
ments. The old San Fernando Mission 

is in this valley. (See Special Pleasun 
Trips). 



THE SIERRAS 
From whence cometh Los 
Angeles water, high up in 
the Sierras, where nature 
aerates and cools and pours 
her^ bountiful supply of life- 
giving waters into the 

aqueduct 







I 



«-• 



f 



-f- » 



Ml •»* 



- 











*.v* 



V 







LEMON ORCHARD, NORTH WHITTIER HEIGHTS, SAN GABRIEL VALLEY 






■ 



i/JW 



^'iiv 










LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



San Gabriel Valley-Tl.is beautiful and 

historic valley, stretching eastward rom 

Pasadena to the San Jose hills and Eroin 

aesSra Madre mountains on the north 

the Whittier hills on the south, is one 

°f he veritable garden spots of Southern 

CaHfornia. Sheltered on the north by the 
maiesl ie range of the Sierra Madres and 
blesse d with wonderfully fertile soil and a 
e li m ate of unusual charm it was, from its 
lh . s , discovery, a favorite of the old 
Franciscan fathers. Hero they founded 

of t heir first and most prosperous 
missions .-ailed San Gabriel, portions of 

wh i e h are still preserved and used 

Later years have brought wondertuJ de- 
velopments, holh in agriculture and the 
building of many beautiful towns. Pasa- 
dena, th<- principal city, whose Indian 
„ ame in e ;1 ns Crown of the Valley, is 
famous all over the world, and Alhambra, 
Monrovia, Azusa, Duarte, North Whittier, 
Glendora, and Covina are other flourish- 
ing centers, each in the heart of a rich 
agricultural district. Around these towns 
and out through the valley are hundreds 

of beautiful country homes. 

Scientific irrigation and cultivation of 
(he fertile soil have made the Valley as 
rich as Nature made it beautiful. One 
may ride all through it on splendid boule- 
vards amid thousands of acres of orange, 
lemon and walnut groves and productive 



wardens in which are grown 



all kinds 

sub'tropical fruits, plants and flowers. 

WATER SUPPLY— See Aqueduct. 

WESTLAKE PARK— This park com. 
prises thirty-one and fifteen hundredth 
acres. It is situated in one of the Piuk 
residential districts at Seventh and AH 
varado streets. The park contains a lake 
covering eleven acres, much used for boat- 
ing and canoeing. There are many fi llt 
views from the park. It contains Bn| 
trees and beautiful flowers and shrubbery 

WILMINGTON— This town was an 
nexed with San Pedro to form the Por. 
of Los Angeles. Wilmington is on tM 
inner harbor. It has been raised frd 
seven to ten feet by depositing upon its 
surface the sand dredged from the harb, 

WILSHIRE BOULEVARD — A fine 
wide street famous for the beautiful home 
which line it on both sides and extent 
down the cross streets in both direction, 
It extends through the western part o 
the city from Westlake Park. 

WHOLESALE DISTRICT— Mainly fro* 

Main Street east. 
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSO 

CIATION— See Clubs, Societies and Lodge 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN AS 
SOCIATION— See Clubs, Societies 



an 



Lodges 



ZOOLOGICAL COLLECTION 

usually Wild Animal Farm. 
lake Park. 



t 



Calif 

Near Easl 






.*. 

















<*■ 



, 









You Will Not Get a Complete Idea of Southern California 

Unless You See NORTH WHITTIER HEIGHTS 

Orange, Lemon, Avocado and Walnut Lands 

The accumulated experience of citrus experts has been used in developing this won- 
derful new district to a perfection only possible where water, soil, location, and 
climatic conditions are of the best. Located in the "World Famous" Whittier 
section, only 16 miles east of Los Angeles, a short and beautiful ride by auto over a 
splendidly paved boulevard. The Salt Lake Railroad skirts the land on the north 
line and the Southern Pacific main line passes within one mile of the property. 

North Whittier Heights was formerly a part of the great estate of E. J. ("Lucky") 
Baldwin and is in the richest section of the famed San Gabriel Valley. 



A Home and An Income 



A business man can have an orange grove home here that will produce a large 
income, and still go to his office or place of business in Los Angeles every day. He 
can also have the satisfaction of knowing that he has a home, with a wonderful view 
of mountains and valley, and where the conditions of life are as nearly ideal as can 
be found in all the world. 

We extend you a cordial invitation to go out with us by auto to see this citrus Empire 
in process of development. The property is being sold in planted and unplanted 
tracts of 5 acres and up and on easy terms if desired. We also have orchard experts 
who care for young groves for non-resident purchasers. We are confident if 
you once see this property and investigate its merits as an investment and its 
desirability as an ideal home, you will secure a portion of it for yourself. S ^ 







mm 



• 



/ 



We shall be pleased to show you North Whittier Heights. Call upon us or 

mail the coupon attached hereto for our free descriptive folder and map S ^ 

of Southern California. „ ,v# 

References: Chamber of Commerce, Los Angeles Realty 
Board or First National Bank of Los Angeles, Cal. 

EDWIN G. HART 



* 



,v« 



,v 



/ 



Manager and General Sales Agent 



917-923 Union Oil Building, 7th & Spring Sts., Los 
Angeles, Cal. 



Phones: 10421— Main— 2606 




SOLID CEMENT ROAD, NORTH WHITTIER BOULEVARD, NORTH WHITTIER HEIGHTS 



/ 






<4' s 










EfcHi 



Something 




Different 




The Ideal Way to See California 



TOUR OF THE LOOP. 

A six-hour motor trip covering interesting 
parts of San Gabriel, Verdugo, San Fer- 
nando and Cahuenga Valleys — a picturesque 
route from Los Angeles through mountain 
valleys and cities to the popular seaside 
resorts. 

ORANGE BELT SPECIAL. 

A one-day motor tour covering interesting 
parts of Los Angeles, Riverside and San 
Bernardino counties, traversing the big 
orange belt, including Riverside, Redlands, 
and San Bernardino, up beautiful Smiley 
Heights and to the summit of Alt. Rubidoux 
with snow-capped Mt. Baldy and Greyback 
in full view. 

SAN DIEGO LIMITED. 

A two-day motor tour covering interesting 
points in Los Angeles, Orange and San 
Diego counties — a wonderful trip through 
mountain, valley and along the sea, past 
Mission ruins and the caves of La Jolla 
to the "Harbor of The Sun." Connections 

made at San Diego for City Tours, the 
Imperial Valley and Tia Juana, Mexico. 

SANTA BARBARA SPECIAL. 

A delightful two-day motor trip following 
the Coast and portions of "El Camino 
Real" (the King's Highway) past many 
historic points to Santa Barbara, sometimes 
called the Mission City and noted for its 
splendid homes. 



BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT ONI V. 

"The Harbor City Loop" is a seven-} 1 ur 

trip from Los Angeles, reaching L ng 
Beach, San Pedro, Point Firmin, Clifi n- 
by-the-Sea, Redondo, Inirlewood and ol r 
interesting points. ''The San l-'erna :o 

Vallev and Aqueduct Limited" reaching 

* m 

Burbank, San Fernando Mission, Xev 11 
Tunnel, the great Aqueduct Gates, \ an 
Nuys, Lankershim, Beautiful Sherman 

\\ ay and Cahuenga Pass. 
BEAUTIFUL PANORAMIC MEW. 

Your name and address will bring you 1 
lovely view, also detailed information a 
to the best and cheapest way to see the 
most desirable points in Southern Calif - 

nia, including the great Panama-California 

Exposition and the interesting side trips 
around San Diego and over the border i. o 
Old Mexico. 

Address Exposition Travel Department. 

SPECIAL SERVICE FREE. 

We are prepared to arrange Hotel, Apart- 
ment Hotel, Apartment House, or Private 
Home accommodations in Los Angeles or 
San Diego, which are first -class in every 
respect at lowest cost. Upon request we 
will arrange for our representative to meet 
tourists at the depot or boat landing to 
assist them in every possible way. 
iddress Hotel Department. 



Southern California Sight-Seeing 



Gen. Offices: 6th Floor Marsh-Strong Building, Los Angel 



Co. 



(Connections with steamships to and from San Fran 



es, Calif. 



Cisco, San Diego and other points.) 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIKCO STANDARD fiUIDE 



SPECIAL 



PLEASURE TRIPS 



HOW TO SEE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BY BOAT. 

TRAIN, TROLLEY OR AUTOMOBILE 



The following descriptive trips will prove of great as- 
sistance as a guide to the tourist who wishes to visit the many 
places of interest in the vicinity of Los Angeles. 

Each of these trips begins and ends at Los Angeles, and 
there are many others equally interesting; in fact, a tourist 
can easily devote a month to sightseeing, visiting a different 
place every day, and if he desires be at his hotel in Los 
Angeles almost every night. 



SPECIAL PLEASURE TRIPS 



r r 



There 



are so many delightful shorl trips lead- 

ii out from Los Angeles in. every direc- 
tion that the tourisl is constantly lured 



;i\v; • from the city to the beaches, 

the orange eroves, the 



the 



mountains, t lie orans proves, ine mis- 



si . and the near-by towns. Weeks can 

l>e enl in seeing fresh and interestinj 

si| in the vicinit\ every day, so thai 

one is tempted to make use of an Irish 

[bull say that the chief delights of Los 

[An 9 are the pleasant and easy ways 

[of* ting somewhere else. However, Los 

[An ■ < herself is full of attractions and 

It lion are organized trips for seeing the 

[city as well as for taking the tourist out- 
side, [f one has the 

take l)olh 



the sierht 



time it is best to 

seeing automobile, 
and the sight seeing trolley trips in the 
city as, except for a portion of the busi- 
ness streets, they cover different routes. 
11 are a number of sight seeing auto- 

[mobiles operated by different 

|They start about ten in the 

two m the 



assengers 



afternoon, 

at the 



companies. 

morning and 

stops for 
principal hotels. A 

may 



maki ng 



Mf-hour before stalling time the\ J 

pe found along Hill Street, Broadway or 
gPnng. The fare is $1.00. The route 

rst goes over the main business streets, 

1K | the principal banks 

11(1 other institutions are pointed out. 

ie n follow the old Plaza and historic 

Jittch of Our Lady of the Angels, the 

a °be homes of the early settlers, the old 



office 



buildings 



cemetery where some of the founders ar 
buried, the city oil belt, the City Ball, 

f deral Building and County < art Bouse, 
the Time- Building, Fort Bill, An 
Flight, Central Park and its sun ind- 

ings, Westlake Park. Sunset Park. 0< > 

dental Park. Luna Park, Wilshire Boule- 
vard and West Adams Str< with their 

beautiful homes, the residences of many 
distinguished people, handsome church< s, 

residential "places/ ' "s [uares" and 

"parks," the bungalow district with its 

wondrous variety of bungalows which 

have cost as much to build as three-story 
mansions. Singleton Court with the ruined 
home and the barn resembling a hand- 
some church, handsome family hotels and 

apartment houses, school buildings and 
hospitals, the whole a short half-day's 
iide. but giving a most interesting | n- 

eral view of the city and its institutions. 

"Seeing Los Angeles" observation 
trolley ear leaves the Pacific Electric sta- 
tion at Sixth and Main streets every day 
at two p. m. The trip covers forty miles, 
takes three hours and the price is fifty 

cents, which includes free admission to 

the Pigeon Farm and Los Angeles Os 
trich Farm. Eastlake Park and the Alli- 
gator Farm are also visited, all exce d- 

ingly interesting places which are de- 
scribed in the body of this book. The 
principal buildings of the city are passed, 

business streets, churches and many hand- 
some residences. 



The 






i j 






•m 



ni 



^t 











LOS 



ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 




THE FLOW FROM ONE WELL ON JAMES RANCH 



ALFALFA DISTRICT: Alfalfa has come to 
be recognized as the best food for stock and 
especially good for dairy cows and hogs. 

The world's biggest producing alfalfa county, 
according to the recent Census, is Fresno 
County, California. One of the most fertile 
sections of this county consists m of the big 
72,000 acre James Ranch which, in situation, 
soil and general conditions, is the most desirable 
section of the chief alfalfa county. 

By means of one of the greatest deals in land 
ever consummated in California, the James 
Ranch consisting of 72,000 acres, has been 
opened to colonization by the San Joaquin 
Valley Farm Lands Company. 

This great tract of land— 113 square miles— 
in ranches of from 10 acres to 200 acres, is now 
on the market. 

Included in the directorate are Marco H. 
Hellman, vice-president of the Merchants 
National Bank; E. T. Stimson, lumberman; 
W. E. Keller, president of the Globe Grain and 
Milling Company; W. L. Valentine, oil oper- 
ator; and Victor G. Kleinberger and F. H. 
Edwards, promoters of many large acreage 
projects. The two latter, who carry on a joint 
business in Los Angeles and who have handled 
some of the largest subdivision propositions 
undertaken in that city, have control of the 
selling of the James Ranch. 

There is no crop that gives a better, quicker 
and surer cash income than alfalfa, and this 
income is the key of success for the beginner 
in the business of farming. There is no crop 
easier to handle or to take care of than alfalfa. 

Four crops of alfalfa may be grown the first 
year, and after that six or more crops can be 
taken from the land. If the land be the same 



as that of the James Ranch, it should yield 
one and one-half to two tons to the acre at each 
cutting Now an acre of alfalfa will support 
two cows for a year. How quickly then is the 
owner of an alfalfa ranch started upon the road 
to independence and prosperity. 

The most convenient, easiest handled com- 
bination in ranching is alfalfa growing and 
dairy farming. It is a most productive plan, 
a plan that eliminates every vestige of waste. 
Every single iota of production is realized upon 
and turned into milk, butter, eggs and pork, 
which can always be turned at short notice nto 
good round American dollars. 

What surer means of reaching the state of 
financial independence than a combined alfalfa 
and dairy farm on the James Ranch? The 
great fertility of the soil, the cheap and al un- 
dant water, the conditions so well suited to the 
growing of alfalfa, the fine transportation 
facilities and the many points near at hand 
where markets may be secured, the all -1 he- 
year-round growing season — all these conditions 
tend to make the James Ranch one of the most 
inviting and surest propositions ever ofl red 
the prospective farmer who knows the possibil- 
ities of alfalfa and dairy farming combined. 
James Ranch has every advantage — it a aits 
the coming of the right people to grasp the 
opportunities that lie idle and to help develop 
its wide and fertile stretches. 

The James Ranch is divided into ranches 
ranging in size all the way from 10 to 100 acres 
and upward. These ranches are sold under 
the most favorable terms and at prices^ remark- 
ably low in comparison to values in other 
places for equally good land. 

The raising of hogs is one of the greatest 
sources of wealth on the alfalfa ranch. Hogs 







BIG 



YIELDS 



OF 



ALFALFA 



ON 



JAMES 
RANCH 




LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



on alfalfa and in this 
the year round. Grow 
trees, then let the hogs 
three sources of wealth 



cold and driving storms; rich sedimentary 
soil that can never waste by erosion; a well 
developed irrigation system and plenty of 
water; lower water rates than in other sections; 
every condition that ensures heavy and con- 
tinuous crops of alfalfa; ideal conditions for 
dairy farming and stock raising; a long growing 
season; and, last but not least, the opportunity 
t0 secure high-class ranch lands at prices that 

tilled and ranks with the are astonishingly low, and terms exceptionally 

With ample water supply easy. 

Detailed information regarding James Ranch 
is furnished free by Victor G. Kleinberger and 
F. H. Edwards, subdividers, 200 H. W. Hellman 
Building, 4th and Spring Streets, Los Angeles. 
Excursions to this district are run from their 
offices at reduced rates every Friday. 

The following coupon will bring any special 

information you may desire in regard to the 

many other crops that can be grown on James 
Ranch. 



thrive wonderfully 

mate they breed 
n f.ilfa between the 

owon the alfalfa 
g V nne piece of land. 

The land is all level. There are no stumps to 
I* 11 no hummocks to level, no stones to haul 
P V and no sagebrush to clear. The land is 
oirpadv plowed and ready at any moment 
with but little further expense. 

The soil is easily tilled and ranks with the 
best in this state. " r: " u 





HAS FLOWED FOR OVER 38 Yl \RS 

t has, it will produce any crop which the 
climatic conditions will permit. 
The company has founded a large experi- 
ental farm of 700 acres where the beginner 
may learn anything that he needs to know 
about any branch of farming and fruit growing. 
He n y learn what is the best for him to secure 
in the way of utensils, seed, trees and stock. 
In a nutshell the advantages of the James 

v m 

Ranch are as follows* — a mild climate with a 
naximum of sunshine; an entire absence of 



ALFALFA 
BERRIES 



PEACHES 



APRICOTS 



ALMONDS 
GRAPES 
RAISINS 
FIGS 



CHICKENS 



Investment 



San Joaquin Vallej 

Farm Lands Co. 

200 H.W. Hellman 

Bldg. 

Gentlemen : 

Please send me illustrated 
literature regarding the Jamt- 
Ranch. I have checked the item 
that interests me particularly. 



Name 



Address 



County 





LOS ANGELES-SAN DIWIO STANDARD GUIDE 








BALLOON ROUTE TROLLEY TRIP 

Tl - trip rives a whole day of pleasur 



Eor *1.<m». 



re 

si hj seeing tor v±.vv. The ride i 

'" of ,, rr;l j scenic beauty, parallehng 

fhe mountains to the sea; then for twen 

(iili .| lt m iies it sk'ms the ocean, melqd- 

iir . |",, n beaches on its way with stops at 

I h e principal ones. The route goes first 

!, the tunnels, pasl the oil district, 

an d Echo parks, through the 

streets of Hollywood, and th 

with its erroves of 



Valley 



walnul and 



<_:vo\ es 
fie tr 



throu 

Elysian 

beautiful 

Cahu« '■«' 

brae • lemon, _ 

l]ll , lli h Sherman with its power plant?, 

[•hop of the Pacific Klectric Railway an 

om( f the company 's employes mostly 

lWlie d by tin' men themselves; pasl the 
L(lS \ n Country Club, with its pretty 

white club bouse and five hundred acres 
() f , dling fields; past Beverly Hills and 
its dsome hotel, and on to Sawtelle 
and i!i f> Soldiei ' Home. Here there 

walk through 



a stop to 

T ou ds of the Borne. 
of Norfolk [sland 

of 



Hi 



i 
handsome 

Superb double 
pines are the 
the place, hut 



rows 

ni.st triking feature 

there are many other handsome trees and 
lirubs and beautiful flowers. The plash- 
in- streams of a large fountain make 
mini \s in the sunshine and fall pleas- 
nil, on the ear. This home comprises 
Mi(\ live buildings and seven hundred 



acres of land, 
iinal Soldiers' 
Unit I 



It is one of the four orig- 
Eomes establisl 1 by the 

Slates Government. There 



are 




ati "»al Soldiers' Home at Sawtelle; the abiding 

1'lace of al>mit 3.000 v rans 



Resides food, shel- 



lnu nine or ten. The inmates number 
"'' three thousand. 

,T : clothing and care in sickrieses, pro- 

asion is made for their recreation. In 
■nmsement Hall facilities for games of 




Oc Park bathing beach and bath house. Beautiful 

and where thousands are entertained 

all sorts are furnished, and a library of 
ver eighl thousand volumes and 11 

periodicals provid the men with plenty 

of interesting reading. The sad note con- 
nected with all this is that the death- 
among tli e veterans average nearly one 
a daw On a near-by hillside is a beau- 
tiful cemetery connected with the home 
In this vicinity was the famous Wolfskill 
ranch, comprising 3,800 acres. From the 

Soldiers 1 Home the ear goes on to Santa 

Monica and the sea. 

Simla Monica i< fourteen mil 3 from 

Los Angeles, the nearesl <>f the beaches 

Linda Vista Park extends along the bluff 
bove the water and makes a lovely 

picture, with its shrubbery and bright 

pink moss borders outlin I against the 

blue ocean. Santa Monica is a beautiful 
city of 20,000 population built on a high 
plateau and extending for two miles alon 
the ocean. Mountains, cleft by picture squ 

canyons, bound it on the north and east, 
and form a setting in sharp contrast t 
the modern city which they almost en- 
circle. Santa Monica is a happy combi- 
nation of a city of permanent and 1 au- 
t i till homes, with wide, beautifully shaded 

* 

streets, splendid boulevards, fine school- 
ami churches, and an all-the-year- md 
seaside re or! of unusual attractions. Sur 
bathing is pleasurable almost every da\ 
the year, the fishing ; - exceptionally 

is a splendid < ucrete 
pleasure pier sixteen hundi 1 f« t Ion 

and fifty feet wide built and owned b\ 

the city. The Cafe Nat Goodwin is a 

most attractive place, built on 

over the sea, affording from its 
rooms, sun parlors and roof garden unob- 
structed views of the beach and 

The service is of the b. st 



in 



tine and ther 



a 



pier 

dining 



an. 



. L 




n-" 



-4 



D O 



N 



OT FAIL TO VI 




IT 




"<Ik 



c 




opu 




ar 



Resort 



nn 



14 Miles from Los Angeles 



VENICE 



is a city o 




Amusements an 




H 



omes 



VENICE 



is quickly reacne 






y 



Electric Cars 



an 



a Autos 



VENICE 




as many Hotels, Apartment Houses 



an 




tt 



e 



best 




City in 



equippe 
tkeW 





or 



Villa 

commodation or visitors. 




ungalow an 





or 



tk 



e ac 






FOR ALL INFORMATION REGARDING VENICE, WRITE THE 



v 



enice 



Lee Ch 




ameer o 



/c 



ommerce 



VENICE, C ALIFORNI A. 



•'!- 



1 





mm 









! 



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LOS 



ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIK'iO STANDARD GUIDE 



Oceanside and country drives offer op- 
portunities for motoring, driving and na- 
ing. The ocean drive along the cliffs a 
hundred feet above the surf is wonderful 
for scenery. A famous automobile race 
is held annually on the Santa Monica 
Boulevard, and each contest sees the 
world's record lowered. Half a dozen 
moving picture concerns have producing 
plants^" in or near Santa Monica, the scen- 
ery and climate being peculiarly favorable 

for the work. 

From Santa Monica the car passes for 
two miles along the boulevard on the 




The canals at Venice; replicas of those of the city of 

far Eastern lore 



water's edge and then the beaches come 
in quick succession, Ocean Park, Venice. 
Playa del Rey, El Segundo, Manhattan, 
Shakespeare Beach, Hermosa Beach, Moon- 
stone Beach and Redondo, each one with 
its own especial attractions. Venice is 
the Mecca for thousands of pleasure lov- 
ers, but it is more than this; it is a rap- 
idly growing city of apartment houses 
and homes, with a population of over 
8,000. It is built in imitation of its 
European prototype, with winding canals 
edged by brilliant pink moss, and high 
bridges under which the gondolas can 
pass. Along the great pleasure pier, and 
within a short distance from it, is every 
device and equipment known to amuse- 
ment resorts. There is also an enoromus 
bath house, an auditorium and a most 
interesting aquarium. A miniature rail- 
way with a train of seven cars winds in 
and out among the canals for a two- 
mile trip. A scenic railway offers a ride 
in the clouds. In St. Mark's Plaza a 
good band plays every afternoon and 



evening and the square is ailed with s. !s 
f or the listeners. A ship drawn up at 
ll 1( > ,,;<>,• is made over into an excellent 
and picturesque cafe; booths and su all 
shops offer all sorts of wares. Every inch 
of the place is full of life and interest. 
At Playa del Bey (the playground of the 
king) is a Lagoon for bathing and boat- 
ing. El Segundo is a new industrial e y. 

Here are situated the great refineries of 
the Standard Oil Company. A1 Ocean 
Park is a pleasure pier and there are thi 
usual amusement features. At Moonsh ie 
Beach a stop is made and all have an 
opportunity to gather the moonstones and 
() {l, er pretty pebbles which abound 01 
this beach. ' Jasper and water agates, as 
well as moonstones, are found. Redoi lo 
Beach is one of the larger resorts. Ben 
is a very large hoi salt water plunge bi th 
recently* buill at a cosl of $200,000. The 
building contains three pools, the larj si 
being 70 by 157 feet. The babies' p ol 
is 30 by 70 feet, with water from 

to two feet deep. In the hhjli di\ 

pool the water is nine f. I deep. Thi i 
are also in the building tub baths of 

every description, sun parlors and e\ v 
convenience. The surf bathing at Re- 
dondo is very fine. The place has als< 
wide reputation for fishing, which is g id 
at all seasons of the Year. There arc 11 

sorts of amusement features here, ho1 Is 
and a tent city among the trees. There 

are restaurants on every hand and here 

the ear stops long enough for the fish 

dinner which every one is ready to enjoy. 
On the return a stop of nearly two houi 

is made at Venice, and Los Angeles is 

reached ahont half past six. 



1 




ttttF SHAPED TRIP- This is a trip 

RH* * , , ..<■ |U Confo |.\. Roil 



St 



The 



<< 



Paseo" at Redondo Beach, one of the nearby 
amusement resorts of Los Angeles 



double loop "f H"' Santa Fe Rail- 

° ve i ' including Etedlands, Riverside and 
Z ' Bernardino, with the hundreds of 
LI of orange groves Bunonnd 1 1 1 - them, 
I 1 many interesting smaller towns. No 

I !f of the route is passed over twico in 

P ;n* and returning. Aboul a two hours' 
|°" is made al both Redlands and River- 

VZ ion enough lor an automulule ride 

?V Vach place, which will B how the beau- 
.. (l f the surrounding scenery. I ho 

,.'.,•,, |.,;,ves the Santa Pe station. Lps 

A]V , v h at 8:30 a. m. and reaches there 
[ ;,,„!•!! at 6:10 p. in., after a day of 
W()I1( lei illy delightful experiences. An 
l M , n , ion i arlor car, buill and decorated 
011 m j ion lines, carries the kite-shaped 
tr;1( .k cursionists. The double loop of 
II,',, ,,, .;-.. i< in the Porm of a figure eighty 
ll l(1 |j,,-j-or loop being between Los An- 
p.l,,< ,i San Bernardino, where the two 
l (l0 |,s in. The smaller one is between 
San B rnardino and Mentone, including in 
its circle. Arrowhead. Highlands and Red- 

lands. 
On leaving the Los Angeles Santa Fe 
ation at Santa Fe Avenue and First 
|tr i he train passes first through High- 
land ! rk, the former seat of Occidental 
lollegi and Garvanza, whore is the art 
buildii of the University of Southern 
California, both towns a part of Los All- 
eles. Then comes South Pasadena and 
It the right the Raymond Hotel stands 

■ 

ut conspicuously fi m its flower-decked 
grown A few miles further and the 
live i tks of Lamanda Park are reached, 

and \t is Santa Anita, the greal 

Lucky" Baldwin ranch, comprising dur- 
ing his lifetime 4!U»00 acres of orchards. 
vineyards and grain fields. Sierra Ma&re 

is i>;i 1. a beautiful little town of "l.fiOO 
population nestling in the foothills of tin 

iJiomi 3. Monrovia is al80 a beauti- 
ful fi thill town one thousand feet above 
tho sea level with views that, like those 

Si' a Madre, are unsurpassed. Duarte 

pi Azusa follow. Although the present 
|wn^ of Azusa was established in 18S7, 

is history goes hack to the early history 

If the State. Tt was a part of one i>\' the 

°1 ( 1 Spanish and later Mexican grants, 

ail, l the ranch of which it was a part; 

t'K'ii consisting of l.l.M acres, was pur- 
chased in 1844 bv ITenrv Hal ton, who 

married the Senorita Zamereno. It be- 
f 1Unp a trading settlement, where Span- 

lar< ls and Indians pursued their vocations 

°t hunting, herding and planting, weav- 






01 



in-j, black mithing and -- i ,h 

sc uol-hou t built, tin 



L865 the ftrsl s 

walls of brush woven 1)' sveen i es, th 

floor of earth and the roof of 
Here the Mexican youths wei taughi th 
rudiments of knowledge. Fine sch d 
buildin of the most modern \y\ ha 
replaced the brush shelter of early days. 
Covina, Glendora, San Dimas, North Pj 








e groves, cil and snow ad mountains. A 
a from Smile) Heights Redlands 



mona and Olaremont are passed in quick 

linked t< her by fruitful 

where fragrant blossoms 



roves 



succession, 

orange 
ill the train with perfume. Clar< nonl 

is the soar of Pomona Colleg( (s i Col- 
leg g and Schools). Cucamonga, just be- 
yond, was a settlement on the old stage 
road between Los Angeles and San Ber- 
nardino. A little further and we reach 
San Bernardino, the intersection of tin 
two loops. This city, t lie county seat oi 
San Bernardino County, is one of the old- 
est of American Southern California 
towns, having been settled by Mormon 
colonists in 1851. It has an elevation of 

ever a thousand feet, and is a mining as 
well as citrus fruit growing center. Tin 

scenery around San Bernardino h ir- 
description. Ranges of mountains appear, 
one behind the other, with lofty whito 
peaks rising high above the l ral range. 
When, in winter, all are clothed in 

snowy white, the contrast with the smil- 
ing: srreen valleys below makes a sc of 
indescribable beauty. 

Six miles north from San Bernardino. 
Arrowhead station is reached. This is 

the station i'ov the Arrowhead Hoi Spring 
which were famous with the Indians for 

their medicinal virtues long before the whit- 
man came: they bubble out of the mountain 
<ide boiling hot and flow down a ravine in a 









iA 



v. 




■ '■ 



■ 














LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



steaming stream, while clown another ravine 
but a short distance away a pure, cold moun- 
tain stream is flowing. On the face ot tne 
mountain, visible for thirty miles away, 
is the plainly marked perfect figure ot 
nn arrowhead, 1,115 feet in length and 
396 feet in width, drawn or sculptured on 
the mountain side without a flaw. Dii- 
t'ering from so many mountain symbols, 
it needs no imagination to trace its sharply 
cut outlines. The figure is made in a 
o-rowth of white sage springing from light 
gray decomposed granite. The background 
is dark earth supporting a thick growth 
of dark green chaparral. It has been 
there as far back as the brain of man 
can trace it, back to the days when the 
first white men learned to speak with the 
Indians and were told that for their an- 
cestors the great arrowhead pointed the 
way to the "healing springs. They have 
a legend that it was made by a fiery ar- 
rowhead hurled from the sky in a battle 
between two warrior gods. Whether God- 
made, man-made or nature-made, we can- 
not tell. We only know that Time has 
not blurred its outlines and the ravages 
of the elements have made no impression 
upon it. 

A few miles further and Highlands is 
reached, picturesque in situation, and sur- 
rounded by orange groves on every hand. 
Then comes Mentone, the extreme point of 
I he smaller loop, where the train swings 
around on the return trip, but there is 
no repeating, for new towns and new 
scenery greet the eye at every curve. 
Redlands, sixty-six miles from Los An- 
geles, is reached soon after eleven. Here 
there is a stop of two hours and ten min- 
utes, long enough for a drive up Smiley 
Heights, through Canyon Crest Park and 
along the tree-lined avenues, between 
groves of oranges, through some of the 
most beautiful portions of this beautiful 
city. North, east and south, the snow- 
tipped mountains lie round about it; on 
the west the valleys open. Orange groves 
are everywhere, surrounding the hand- 
some homes or covering the level acres 
of the valley. Handsome churches and 
schools and a beautiful library building 
add to the attractions of the city. 

After luncheon at Casa Loma, one of 
the charming hotels of Southern Califor- 
nia, the trip proceeds, through Colton 
to Riverside, which is reached at 2:15. 
Here time is allowed for an automobile 
ride through the principal streets, like 
those of Redlands, shaded by graceful 




Riverside Mission Inn, famous for its architecture, its 
Mission furnishings and unbounded hospitality 

pepper trees and eucalyptus with orange 
and lemon groves everywhere; and up 
Roubidoux mountain, where the field of 
vision is widened at every foot of rise, 
Then back to the famous Glen wood Mis- 
sion Inn. There is time enough left to 
examine the court, the library, the clois 
ters and music room. It is a place so 
full of interest and beauty that everyone 
must leave it with regret. Automobiles 
for the drive meet the incoming trains. 
(See Chapter on Hotels of Southern Cali- 
fornia.) 

After leaving Riverside, the train 
passes through Arlington, Corona, Rich- 
field, Placentia, La Mirada, Los Nietos, 
Whittier and Rivera, all pretty, growing 
towns where citrus and deciduous fruits 
and walnut trees flourish. At Whittier, 
in the Pnente hills, is a Friends' College, 
and the State reform school. Rivera is 
the center of the walnut growing indus- 
try. At 6:10 La Grande station, Los An- 
geles, is reached. One hundred ami 
fifty-eight miles have been traveled over 
a route which for diversitv and interest 
can scarcely be equalled. The fare for 
the trip includes stop-over privileges, if 
one wishes to stay a short time at any 
point. This does not include the drives 
at Redlands and Riverside, which are 

optional and extra. (See also Orange Belt 
Special.) 

LAUREL CANYON, INCLUDING 
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN— Take a Holly 
wood car marked Laurel Can von, at Hill- 
Street station of the Pacific Electric. The 
entrance to Laurel Canyon is reached 
through Sunset Boulevard and Hollywood 
Boulevard. Here connection is made with 
the trackless trolley car, the first in 
America. The car passes first betweefl 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



over Laurel 



r . n *e and lemon groves § 

von Mountain Boulevard into the can- 
proper. The road winds and turns 

Hith 



the little mountain brook, giving 



! 



2 mpS e S here and there of pretty homes 
if hidden in the trees. After a two- 
• e rifle the junction of this boulevard 
nll fh Hie Lookout Mountain road is 
Eicbed This is the terminus of the 
Packless trolley in the center of Canyon 
r as tle Park, which is the site of the new 
X nV on Castle Hotel. Here is a rustic 
; n V where delicious chicken dinners, or 
lighter refreshments, are served under the 
[trees, on the shady porches, or in the 
feasant dining room. As the trackless 
■trolley car makes frequent trips there is 
L en ty of time to explore. Continuing 
hlon* Laurel Canyon road we pass more 
beautiful homes where the grounds have 
keen adapted to the natural beauties of 
rock and boulder and enhanced by foun- 
tains and waterfalls. Further on the 
■Laurel Park golf grounds are reached and 
just beyond is San Fernando summit, 
which affords a wide panoramic view of 
the San Fernando Valley, the towns of 
■Van Nuys, Owensmouth. Burbank and of 
■the old San Fernando Mission itself. This 
summit is only a ten minutes' walk from 
Iwheio the trolley was left. Returning to 
that point and taking the turn to the 
right we are in the Lookout Mountain 
road, which passes through another part 
of Canyon Castle among scores of unique 
[bungalows. When the summit of Lookout 
Mountain is reached we discover that its 



name is fulh 



justified. The vision en- 
compasses the city and the sea and the 
■towns between; it sweeps the length of the 

Valley, embraces Hollywood, 

Beverly Hills, Sawtelle, the 

Homo." Santa Monica, Venice 

and Plava del Rev. a wonderful 



BCahuenga 

Sherman, 

Soldiers' 



Rey, a wonderful view, 
well worth the slight effort of the climb. 
The way is not steep and there are no 
difficult places. Returning to the track- 
less trolley we ride back to the Hollywood 
car. The fare on the trackless is ten cents 
each Avay. 

MT. LOWE— The Mt. Lowe trip is an 
excursion worth coming many miles to 
take, a wonderful experience which can- 
not be repeated elsewhere. There are 
higher mountains which are accessible, but 
in comprehensive and varied views, in 
steep grades »-▼**! i™ *h« nvprp.nmimr of 



and varied views, 
and in the overcoming 
engineering difficulties which amounted 
almost to impossibilities, the Mount Lowe 
tap is unique. Trains leave the Pacific 



Electric station at Sixth and Main streets 
at 8, 9, and 10 a. m., and at 1:30 
and 4 p. m. The trip to Alpine Taveri 
takes two hours. We cross a portion 
of the San Gabriel Valley, pass thi 
Raymond Hotel and Hotel Maryland 
in Pasadena and go on to the north 
through AUadena, which lies just at th 
foot of the mountain. Soon the track 
begins to climb, winding around shoulders 
of the mountain, and opening new scenes 
at every curve. If it is late winter or 




On the trail of Mount Lowe to the summit of the 

famous mountain 



early spring, the poppy fields of Altadena 
are * spread below like sheets of gold. 
Soon Rubio Canyon is reached, a beauti- 
ful cool glen between Mt. Wilson and Mt. 
Lowe, twenty-two hundred feet above the 
sea. This is the beginning of the^ incline 
which reaches up to Echo Mountain thir- 
ty-five hundred feet altitude, an ascent .of 
thirteen hundred feet in the three thous- 
and which are to be traveled to reach 
the top of the incline. A look up the 
steep slope is startling, but we know the 
cable is tested to one hundred tons and 
never carries more than five; we know 
the car with its tiers of seats rising one 
above the other is fastened to the cable 
permanently, not held by a grip, and we 
seat ourselves with confidence The grades 

from forty-eight ^ to 
almost unbeliev- 



of the incline varj 
sixty-two per cent, an 
able degree of steepness, 
summit of Echo Mountain, much of 
terest is found. First and always is 

Nearer at hand is 
be examined and 

the 



Reaching the 

in- 
the 
the 
the 



glorious view. 

power house to 

mechanism that pulls the car 

crest is the great search-light 

from the Columbia Exposition 

It £ of 3,000,000 candlepower and at night 



On the 

brought 

1893. 



m 



»_ 



mmam 






• • 



I 



1&4 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 








Mount Lowe Incline Railway 



light 



the 



ih 



can agai up tne whole mountain side, 
cast its rays into the deepest canyons, 
or send its beams over cities in the val- 
ley below. Mt. Lowe observatory is close 
by, containing a In rue and powerful tele- 
scope and a very fine spectroscope. The 
great purity of the air makes this a p e . 
culiarly favorable situation for 1 lie use 
of both instruments. 

From Echo Mountain the third and 
most spectacular stage of the journej be- 
sins. The trolley car climbs fifteen hun- 
dred feet in the five miles between Echo 
Mountain and Alpine; there are 127 curves 

and twenty bridges in these five miles, 
and, at times, on looking down, five sep- 
arate lines of mils can be seen, and a! 
one place by looking up and down, nine 
are visible. The longest piece of straight 
track is only 120 feet. The circular bridge 
is one of the seemingly impossible engi- 
neering feats, spanning a canyon, reach- 
ing around a mountain spur and ascending 
as it goes. The car passes through tlio 
Granite Gateway, passes Los Flores Can- 
yon, Millard's and Grand canyons, and 
always climbing until, five thousand feet 
above the sea, Alpine Tavern is readied. 
All the way has been a succession of b ;m- 
tiful views over San Gabriel, La Canada 
and San Fernando valleys, over Altadena, 
Pasadena, Los Angeles and smaller towns, 
over the ocean to Santa Catalina, Santa 
Barbara, San Clemonte and the San "Nich- 
olas Islands. Tn places the view is wide; 
again there are only glimpses between 
the trees. 

Alpine Tavern is a pretty hotel sur- 
rounded by gnarled live oaks and tall 
pines standing at the head of Grand Can- 
von. the upper terminus of the trolley 



line. 



upper 
A large central hall with a mam- 
moth stone fireplace gives a most hospi- 
table air to the place. The meals are 
excellent. Near-by are a number of lent 
cottages for those who desire to live out 
of doors. The "trail" starts from the 

tavern and winds three miles to the sum- 
mit of the mountain, eleven hundred feet 
above the tavern. The trip may be made 
by ponies or burros, or by walking if one 
desires. The view from the summit, of 
course, surpasses all the rest, but many 
prefer the quiet enjoyment of the tavern 
and vicinity and go no further. Besides 
the trail to the summit there are numer- 
ous other pleasant trips over the moun- 
tains to be taken from the tavern. In the 
winter the snow is often deep on Mt. Lowe 
and Mt. Wilson, and an hour's ride froff 






I n.n-i will take one from roses riotin_ 

One 

00 JK OlTMt. Lowe or Mt. Wilson m 

J 10 f ornoon. The round trip fare 

jjt Lowe is $2.50 from Los Angeles. 



maV follow the tournament of roses 
Year's morning by a game of 



for 




Lbove the clouds on Mount Lowe, 6.000 feet above 

the floor of the San C.ahnel Valley 



MT. WILSON— From the summit of 
It. Wilson is seen one of the most beau- 
tiful panoramic views in the world, range 
upon range of mountains, broad and fer- 
tile valleys, groves and orchards, fields 

[and vineyards, the shores of Long Beach, 

Ban Pedro and around to Santa Monica, 
the island lying- miles out from shore 
frith the Pacific rolling between, and per- 
haps, if it is very clear, Point Loma 
avny on the southern horizon. An auto- 
lobile road to the summit is now oyen 

o the public. People using the road do 

io at their own risk. The company will 
hot be responsible for accidents. At tl\e 
[toll house on Santa Anita Avenue, pri- 
ate machines are given a book of refl- 
ations, giving distances, rules governing 
use of road, etc. There is an average 
grade of ten per cent. The summit is 
nine and one-quarter miles from the toll 
fcouse. An automobile stage is operated 
between Pasadena and the summit. It 
[leaves Pasadena at 9:30 a. m., arrives at 
the summit at 11 :45. On returning it leaves 
; 't 3 p. tn., and arrives at Pasadena at 4:45. 
■Seats should be engaged in advance. Full 
[information can be obtained at the Pasa- 
Idena office, 173 East Colorado Street, or 
| a t any of the information bureaus in 
ILos Angeles. The fare is $4.00 for the 
pund trip. The views on this road are 
[unsurpassed. Mt, Wilson can also be 
leached by trail from Sierra Madre. At 



Sixth and Main streets, Los Angeles, take 
a Pacific Electric car for Sierra Madre, 
a fifty minutes' ride over one of the 
prettiest routes in the system. Sierra 
Madre is a beautiful little city, which 
could live on its scenery if any town 
could. From no place is it so easy by 
trail to get into the mountains for which 
the town was named. Here at the Mt. 
Wilson stables burros, mules and saddle 
horses can be obtained. A burro is $2.00 
lor the round trip; mules or horses are 
$2.50. On the summit of Mt. Wilson is 
an enormous solar observatory, and a 
museum connected with it which contains 
all the photographs of the heavenly bod- 
ies taken here. 

OLD MISSION TROLLEY TRIP— This 

is one of the all-day trips of the^ Pacific 
Electric, a day of the most varied de- 
lights, embracing Pasadena, famed all 
over the continent for its beauty, a visit 
to hoary old San Gabriel Mission and a 
stop at the Cawston Ostrich Farm. The 
route lies along the foothills of the Sierra 
Madre mountains and through the beau- 
tiful San Gabriel Valley, with constantly 
varying views of mountains, hills, charm- 
ing" towns and smiling fields checkered 
with orange groves and vineyards. Shortly 
before reaching San Gabriel the train 
passes through Alhambra, known as the 
Gateway to the San Gabriel Valley. It 
is a pretty modern citv with a $50,000 
library, fine schools and many charming 
homes. 

At San Gabriel the first stop is made 
and time is allowed to go through the 
church, examine the interesting historical 
relics and to get a glimnse of the quaint 
little town. San Gabriel Mission may 
truthfully be called the Mother of Los 
Angeles.' for it was from here that Felipe 
de Neve, accompanied bv Padres of the 
Mission, pablodores, soldiers and Ij^ms, 
set out one September day in 1/81 to 
found the Pueblo de Nuestra Senora. 
Reina de Los Angeles. San Gabriel itself 
was founded just ten years earlier by the 
Franciscan padres. Somera and Cambon 
who. with ten soldiers, marching north 
from San Diego, came to this wide and 
beautiful valley under the shelter of the 
Sierra Madre mountains. Selecting a 
favorable location they erected a large 
wooden cross, sprinkled the ground with 
h0 lv water and with hymns and prayers 
dedicated the spot to San Gabriel Arcangel. 
The Indians at first regarding these demon- 
strations with curiosity, soon assumed a 



»*^ 



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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 






. 







St. Peter's, Rome, nor the Cathedral at Cologne, nor yet Notre Dame, hath the quid 
restful grandeur of the Missions of Southern California in and around Los Angeles 



ttitude, 
the whole 



party, 



threatened 
but 



the 



mis- 
Lai 

li - 



• I nfflllllll'. \ V I I 1 * ' I I 

hostile 

IiveS .L "unfurling before them a 
;' on n a 'on which was painted a 

h Z oicture of the Virgin, were, notwith 
J\u their faith, astonished at the ei 
*? it produced. The [ndians immediately 
'! -trated themselves upon the ground 

n )U . fi n f submission. From tin 

witn evi ijr »•© . . 



tin* Mission 



pitious beginning | «« ( «~»u«. ffn-w 
1 spered until, with its fertile held- 

PJ ; ,.', P ds, its cattle and sheep upon 

h0 a nd hills, and its herd of horses 
Lmnx in the valleys, it came to be called 
P q een of the Missions. Its garden 
I vf)1 . |1 i with plenty. There were 
u ran o . lim , citrons, appl . pears, 
^ eac pomegranates, figs and -rapes in 
bun dance. From the grap five or «ix 
numi - j barrels of wine were made an- 
nlia lh and two hundred barrels of brandj 
he Q Gabriel wine was much sought 
after But all was held by the padres as 
a saci .1 trust. As with the other mis 
ioi li pitality was unlimited. No I iv- 
eler who cross 1 their thresholds pa ed 

on his way unrefreshed. 




Old Mission San Gabriel, One of the few 
remaining links with the days of the early Dons 




The San Gabriel Indians seem to have 
been superior to many of the early Cali- 
fornia Indians, with some customs of civ- 
ilization. Marriages between those near 
°f kin was forbidden. Robbery was un- 
known. They had names tor the points 

"f the compass and the North Star, and 

a name for God signifying Giver of life. 
They were taught by the padres all sorts 

f_ handicrafts and in time became so 
skilful that they built a ship which was 
launched in San Pedro harbor. The> as- 

Sls ted in preparing the first temporary 



place of worship and a garrison for the 
Idlers which were built, palisade fash- 
ion, on the banks of the river Tei iblores. 
During the last decade of the eighteen 
century the site of the 



mission 



was 



hanged and the present edifice was be- 
gun. It was finished in the earl\ years 

of the nineteenth centurv. The main walls, 
six I t thick, are built of stone up to 
the windows; from there up of brick. 

There was formerly a tower on the south- 
east corner which was destroyed by an 
earthquake in 1812. The original 
was desl id then and replac 1 by an- 
ther of tiling. 

The buttressed walls and pierced cam- 
panile of San Gabriel are familiar pictures. 
Poets have sung of them; artists have 

transferred their characteristics to canvas. 
Verse and picture have touched the imagi- 
nation, but the sight of these brown, 
lichened walls and of the bells still swing- 
ing in their niches reaches deeper and 
moves the heart. There are older churches 
on the Atlantic Coast, but they were built 
in communities and towns already estab- 
lished because the people wanted them. 
These old churches of our western coast 
were plant 1 in a virgin wilderness by men 
of vision, and our first cities and towns 

grew w\^ about them. Many of them suf- 
fered by earthquakes and all by years of 
neglect, but in their best days they wer 
far finer structures than those earlier 
churches of the Atlantic Coast, and this, 
notwithstanding the infinite difficulties to 

be overcome. Lacking mill and kiln and 
quarry the Indians were taught to supplj 
these needs, the raw materials had to be 
found and where seemingly necessary ma- 
terials were wanting, the fertile brains of 
the padres found substitutes. Undei 
similar circumstances our Puritan ancestors 
built churches of logs in which to worship. 
These men. by faith and infinite patience 

hu jl t massive walls of architectural beauty, 

which even after years of abuse and 
neffl I have endured more than a century 

ami a quarter. . _. , 

Under secularization San Gabriel suffered 

ia deterioration. At many of the mis 

sions the padi 3 remained at then- posts 

and M far as possible ministered to their 
scatti I flocks ; one perished of starvation 
rather than forsake his Indians; but their 
jands were taken from them and in the end 
I'ulv all the missions had to be aban- 

aone |. San Gabriel, once Queen of the 

Sons, suffered with the rest Li some 
eases il has taken long years of litigation 






t. 



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EC 







LOS ANGELES-SAN DIHGO STANDARD GUIDK 


























BM DMT' 



2*"4J*$*$-f* * 



FROM ill, MOUNTAINS TO THE SEA IN AN HOUR 
Where else do the confines of a single hour compensate with a dip in the 
through a world of fruit, and flowers, under the influence of limitless 

to a battle of snow balls among the clouds' 



Surf, a drive 

sunshine, 



•ilii 

full) 



. .,., church to repossess herself of such 

:ort missions as now belong to her; in 

'„„„„,; the abandoned and half- 
P? pctahlisbments have been shame- 

TplSiwd. Roofing ami paving tiles 

been carried away for secular uses. 

f u t he bells have been stolen and sonic 

Vl 'rhem put 1" I'H'I'ane uses. One of 

was bung between two posts on a 

' ie "h •iriu used to call the laborers to 

?''',.' So the task of restoring again to 

■ i,,..l uses such of these missions as 

could be so used has been a I. envy one. 



i 




minus 1, h Gardens at Pasadena, the "Crown City 
hi the famous San Gabriel Valley 



" 



Since H '■ 'S San Gabriel has been a charge 
of the Sons of the Immaculate Heart of 
Mary. They have rebuilt the old ehapel, 
put the church in good conditio!] and col- 
lected us many as possible of the scattered 
■lies pertaining to the church. These are 
now displayed to good advantage and are 

ccessible to visitors. There is a Large 
collection of paintings, many of them from 

pain and Mexico and some of much artis- 
tic merit; there are old vestments, altar 
cloths, tools, records, candle-sticks, proces- 
sional crosses and many other interesting 
tilings. The original, hand-hewn doors of 

one of the 

rooms. They are decorated with large 

co l ) l ,l, i' nails. Two of the doors were hung 
on 1'ivoted hinges. 

Hw baptistry is very interesting. 

" nt i* a huge copper bowl hammered out 

J hie Indians, and resting on a massive 

one base. There are many Indian relics. 

such as arrowheads, stone mortars and 
P^K baskets, etc. 

. j e library contains some rare volumes 
P^ted early in the sixteenth century and 

Qe printed in 1489. Most valued of all are 



the mission are preserved in 



The 



the documents. San Gabriel in fortunate 

in po essing all of her records from the 
foundation and she has manv other d 
ments bearing the signatures of the founders 

and of Father Serra. There a e also 

parchments of the fourteenth and fifte* th 
centuries; and a map of the Holy Land 

made in 1705. 

From the dim light of the church and 
the contemplation of these relics of bygone 

centuries we step out into the sunshine 

and present-day San Gabriel. The electric 

railway, electric lights, the new resident 

of the fathers and a few other modern 

buildings cornier! us with our own day, 
but all through the town there lingers the 

flavor of a century that is closed. Black- 
eyed children playing in the si root ar 
talking Spanish. Many of the houses are 

adobe. No! far from the church is the en- 
closure wherein is growing a famous old 

1 i i 5 . 



grape 
covers 



It 



was planted in 

square feet and the 



vine. 

9,000 square t'eet and the mam 
trunk is five and a half feet in circumfer- 
ence. If, according to directions on a 

placard, a rope is pulled which hangs out- 
side the enclosure, a large bell inside is rung 
which brings someone to the door in the 
wall. Ten cents admits us into this arbor, 
which is the entire yard over which the 
vine is trained. There is so much which 
is interesting to see in San Gabriel that 
a whole day spent there is none too much. 
specially if it is during the season of the 
Mission Play. In that case it is charming 
to bring a luncheon and eat it at one of 
the little tables under the arbor, ordering 
to drink with it grape juice made from 
the fruit of the famous vine. They will 

* 

also furnish luncheons. 

The Mission Playhouse, where John Mc- 
Groarty's Mission Play is produced twice 
daily from December to July, is directlv 

the road from the church. 



is 






across 

Mission Play.) 

Pasadena is the next stop. Here two 
hours are allowed which gives time for an 
automobile ride about the city, through per- 
fumed Orange Grove Avenue, past the main 

beautiful homes, surrounded by ground- 
still more beautiful, and the splendid 
hotels in their park-like surrounding-, to 

the famous Busch Gardens, in which there 

is time for a walk. The automobile is 

optional, but well worth the additional 

special rate of 40 cents. For further de- 
scription of Pasadena see Pasadena Auto- 
mobile Trip. From Pasadena the route 

passes through a line of attractive foot- 
hill towns nestled under the shadows of 



XiT 



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* I 



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FROM .TOUTHEPN CALIFORNIA" 

POYAL MIQtiNEJ/ 
AMEPICAN FAPMEP- 






WATER IS KING IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. Wherever he kirses the 

earth with his refreshing moisture he leaves in his wake fields of prosperity and homes 
of contentment, enabling many men who found it hard to make money on 1 60 acres 
in the middle West, to live like princes on ten to twenty acres and annually place in 
the bank a balance to provide for the winter of their days. 

ON THE REVERSE PAGE NUEVO RANCH, divided into ten and twenty 

acre irrigated farms, is illustrated. It represents profit and contentment, nestling 
between the mountains of the valley of Southern California. Paradise indeed for 
the man who loves the great glorious outdoors, not too far from the city, three miles 
from the up-to-date town of Perris and within fifteen miles of Riverside, the most 
beautiful city of twenty-five thousand people in the world. 

LESS THAN EIGHTY-FIVE MILES FROM LOS ANGELES. A quarter of a 

mile from a railroad. Climate, irrigation, soil and transportation as nearly perfect 
as possible, in the heart of the best apricot, peach and olive country in America, 
where land values are going to double and treble within the next few years. 

I WANT YOU TO WRITE TO ME, mentioning this publication, and I will send 
you a beautiful colored map of Southern California, and full details of NEUVO ten 
and twenty acre irrigated farms, 
to the office and we will be 



truthfully inform you 






• 




When you are in Los Angeles come in- 
glad to do everything we can to 
about Southern California. 



RH .Wagner 



• REALTY BOARD BLDC- 

63/ fQ SPRING J~TPEET 

lor Auc 

CALIFORNIA 




LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



the 



eJ 



Qiprra Madre. At Glendora, the east- 
' terminus of the trip, 
r. i AMnm Dacking J 



pped or 



orange P 



one of the best 

houses in the (lis- 



? 



^^rViSted. 'It is an interesting sight 
J watch the washing, sorting and packing 
I he fruit, all but the wrapping done by 
hinerv which almost seems to possess 



tbe fruit, all but the wrapping done h> 
- on ,V inteliigeiice. The process of making 

ie oranges. Corning 



the boxes and nailing 

IM1 ,, as sorting' tl 
fackto LosAngeh Urn route passes u oar 
J ie Huntington mansion and through South 

Pasadena by 
\m\ homes. 






inaiiv handsome bungalows 




Famous Cawston Ostrich Farm, strangest of sight- 

and one of never failing interest 



The last stop is at the Cawston Ostrich 
arm. a place known East and West and 

famous, not only for its large flock of live 
birds, but for the quality of plumes pro- 
Iikm'iI there. (See Ostrich Farms.) Ad- 
mission to the farm is free for excursion- 
ists of this trip. Price of the trip, exclu- 
sive of automobile in Pasadena, $1.00. 
ORANGE BELT EXCURSION— This e\- 
ursion is a combined trip of the Salt Lake 
Railroad and Southern Pacific, including, 

[like the kite-shape trip, Riverside, Redlands 
pnd much of the best orange and lemon-pro- 

ucing country in the world. Also like the 
kite trip, 1 lie routes going and returning 

re different. From Los Angeles to River- 
side the way is by the Salt Lake Railroad. 

barest of the route is by the Southern 

acific. But the loop is narrower than on 
|he kite-shaped track. Except Riverside 
M Redlands, none of the same towns are 
passed through as on the kite-shaped track 
pich inns farther north into the foothill 
reg-ion and somewhat further south. In 
1,10 Orange Belt Excursion three hours are 
pven to Riverside and it is planned so that 

uncheon may be had at the Mission Inn. 



t 



The trip is personally conducted by an in- 
telligent guide who points out all places of 
interest and is ready to answer all ques- 
tions. The train leaves the First Street 
Salt Lake station at 8:40 a. m. On hoard- 
in- the train ask for the Orange Belt Ex- 
cursion conductor. Soon the train is flvim 
past truck gardens, past walnut groves 
from which are shipped annually thou- 
sands of tons of nuts, through the old Pico 
ranch of other days, past big dairies, the 

Lucky Baldwin ranch, bee ranches, the 
pink and white rose hedges of a rose 
nursery and then comes Pomona, and the 

a 

scent of oransre blossoms fills the car. Po- 
niona Valley, opening out from the eastern 
end of San Gabriel Valley, was once a 
grazing ground for the mission flocks and 
herds. Later, in the years of seculariza- 

* 

tion, Governor Alvarado granted to Ignacio 
Palomares and Ricardo Vejar, two of his 
soldiers, 25,000 acres out of the mission 
lands. This grant was known as the 
Rancho San Jose and it included all the 
territory on which are located Pomona, 
Lordsburg, Claremont and part of San 
Dimas. Graduallv after California came 
into possession of the United States this 
land was cut up into small holdings. In 
1875 Pomona was platted and the same year 
the Southern Pacific Railroad was built 
through the town. A prize of a town lot 
was offered for the best name suggested 
for the now eity. The man who won sold 
his lot for $12.").' Today it is worth $35,000. 
Pomona has a population of 12,500, and is 
increasing rapidly. Tt is an up-to-date 
(own in every particular with fine streets. 
pretty parks, handsome business houses. 
superior schools, including a manual train- 
in,- school and a polytechnic high, and 
eighteen churches. The citrus industry is 
its greatest source of revenue, though 
deciduous fruits and small fruits are also 
extensively raised, and a large fruit can- 
",,. v is 'in operation. The raising ot 
sugar beets is also profitable and there is 
a hoot sugar factory with an annual output 
of 2,500 carloads. Pomona College was 
established here, but later moved to 
Claremont. 
We leave the pretty station surrounded 

by flowers and hedges and soon reach 

Ontario, a town of over 6,000 and growini 

^ t the rate of about ten arrivals daily. 
The land on which Ontario stands was 

bo^ht and platted in 1882 by the Chaffay 
Brothers, two Canadians from the province 
if Ontario It possesses the same ad- 
vanSes as Pomona of soil, abundant 



iiorv 



O' 













LOS ANGELKS-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



m imi an d electric trail . ga 

tv ;lh ' 1, <:.... schools and busines bouses, 



|(,'(ricily 



team 

ine 



r,, " , ' (( ; churches and no saloons, which 
forbidden Cor all time, every dee 



L^'the prohibitive 



; s tin* mam 



claus 
thorouerhfari 



.udid 
ll 



i ,,Ml lrH.liiallv t'l-nm :i kv.-l of lr>s than 

r" ;,,',! feet al the city ball to an alti 

I jlf IW( .|itv-!ivr hundred. This 1 1 1 _■ 1 1 



I 1( i(. of tweuty-nve 

IV,. | fl two bundi I ! t wide and seven 

The electric railroad tracks, 
r beautiful p pper and er< ill 



liles loi 



t,v^. f»py 



tin* center. 



On either sid 
*,.,! bordered carriage drives. Beau 

I orai arov< face tin 



til'ul I ana 

,,„. ,„i the right and left. From tb< 
■ " ' * : a maffnificenl 



clear i hat 



Lp „r Kuclicl Avciiii.- is 

v j ew , The air is usually so 
| oull 1 ; , hundred tnih away, and the 
[lands i the Pacific Ocean, ay be 
j . ,, looking southward one - the 

I , \ n ., range; to the southeast, Moun! 
I arl .i tito and i«» the west, the San 
(; a brii ountains. Ontario, like Pomona, 
y ,,•• ; bj the tracks of the insel 

l ou t, the Southern Pacific, by the main 
li Santa Fe and by the San P< dro, 

I,s An lea ami Sail Lake railroads. 

| Tli.- -kin- linn- -f the Citrus Kruit 

Issoc i is one of the lar si in the 
S a te, Deciduous fruil is extensively 

liiscil ami there is an enornnm- canninL' 

factor; nh a yearly outpul of 5,000,000 
-. Tl Pacific Electric Heating I !om 
1 ny manufacture here the ' * 1 lo! Poinl ' 
ii ..n and electric percolators and there 
an- i v other indusl ries. 

We a through pari of the big Chino 
audi, once embracing 50,000 acres. The 

[land i i ."\\ largely gi\ en o^ i r to walnuts. 

|uu; Hs and alfalfa. Then Winoville. 

e shipping poinl for a greal wine indus- 
iy is eached. The soil looks like barren 
and, but flourishing: vineyards line the 

* 

rack on tin i iuhl and on the lefl for 
liles. Mt. San Antonio of the Sierra 
tadre range is seen in the distance. Jus! 
efore reaching Riverside the Santa Ana 
per is crossed on a beautiful eonereti 

pi'id-jc. 

A.I Riverside an automobile meets the 
rai ii. The rid.e is optional, of course, bul 

j 1 ^"Har and a half and an hour ami a 

l;l 'f * >• never spenl to happier advan- 
ce than in the drive through the beau- 
P tul streets of Riverside and over the 
pooth rock-bordered road thai winds 
| ro ^d Roubidous 

111 the route of I 

•robabld 



thai th 



Mountain, which 

Camino Real, 
padres passed 



lit 

It is 

along 




\ typ f the roads that surround Los Angeles, lead- 
ing through the domain of the Orange 

it- base many times on their journeyings 

from one mission to another, and a cross 
has been erected on the summit to the 
memorj of the Padre Presidente, Junipero 
Serra. At sunrise on Easter morning a 
unique and 1" u if ul act of worship takes 
pl at the foot of this cross. Those 

who participate g her in the early dawn. 
climb the mountain and with the firs! 
bright rays of the sun lift up their voices 
in prayer and praise. After this solemn 
service, led in 1913 by Dr. Henry Van 
Dyt they repair to the Mission Inn for 
n Eas -r breakfast. The view from the 
slopes of Roubidoux is unsurpassed, one 
is tempted to say, but that must be said 
..: so many elevations in California that 
the adjective is dangerously overworked, 
v this but feebly expresses these thou- 
sands ^i' acres of blossoming and fruited 

..ran trees at our feet, spreading far 
away on either hand, beautiful homes in 
the foreground, flowers everywhere, and 
)„ ,,,-d bul brought near by the crystal- 
line atmosphere, the foothills, green or 
brown, and then the blue mountains with 
their snow-whitened summits. 

Magnolia and Victoria avenues are two 

famous and beautiful drives of Riverside. 

Sherman Institute, a government Indian 
school, is on Magnolia Avenue and in- 



cluded in the itinerary. 

Riverside is a city of about 18,000 pop- 
ulation, beautiful in itself as well as beau- 
tiful in situation. It has handsome streets, 
bordered by fine trees and lighted by 
artistic concrete electroliers; it has splen- 
did public schools, a handsome county 

courthouse, public library, Woman \ Club 

House Young Men's Christian Association 

building, twenty-five churches and no 
saloons! Charming homes in beautiful 

„ oun ds are on every side. Riverside is 



44 



"^p%i 






» 















LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS .YNGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



sometimes called the Mission City, not 

because there was ever a mission there, 
but because the builders had the wisdom 
to adopt some of the chief characteristics 
of mission architecture for then- public 
buildings. The public library building 
and the beautiful Glenwood Mission Inn 
are excellent examples. When 1 1 1 o drive 
is over about an hour and a half is lefl 
for luncheon and the Glenwood. Long 
enough to leave us unhurried, but not 
nearly long enough for enjoyment of this 
wonderful place and all the delights i\ 
contains. (For description of this charm- 
ing and unique hotel, see chapter on the 
Notable Hotels of Southern California.) 

Riverside is left at 1:50 and twenty 
minutes later the enterprising town of 
Colton is reached. There are granite and 
marble quarries near and the industries 
of the city are varied. 

Redlands is reached at 2:35. Here the 
stop is an hour and thirty-five minutes. 
Carriages meet the train for the drive 
to Smiley Heights and about the city. 
The price is $1.00. Redlands is another 
beautiful city with about 12.000 popula- 
tion. Wide parkways edge the streets 
with a double row of trees and ornamental 
shrubs. The boulevards have tree-shaded 
parkways down the center. Beautiful 
residences abound. The University of 
Redlands has $500,000 invested in build- 
ings and equipment, with a cam | his of 
sixty-three acres. There are many churches 
and no saloons. Redlands has eighteen 
packing houses, shipping 5,000 carloads 
of oranges annually. Olive products and 
dried deciduous fruits are other industries. 
There are thirteen parks in the city, either 
public or open to the public. Chief of 
these is the six hundred-acre park of A. 
K. Smiley, known as Smiley Heights. 
This is a beautiful blending of nature 
and the landscape architects art, being 
not only beautiful in itself, but affording 
a wondrous panoramic view of the valley 
beneath and the distant mountains. Casa 
Loma is the handsome and commodious 
hotel of Redlands, another of Southern 
California's delightful inns. 

The route back is by way of the South- 
ern Pacific and mainly through another 
series of towns. We pass Loma Linda 
four miles from Redlands, a delightful 
and helpful sanitarium, for tired, over- 
strenuous men and women. We pass Col- 
ton, Ontario and Pomona again, then the 
road diverges and we go through Lords- 
hurg, San Dimas and Covina, all centers 



ain 



of the citrus industry. Covina is built 

(m one of the "Lucky" Baldwin ranch 

Ij, is nearly evening when San Qabri^ 
is reached and at 7 p. in. the train < M it, 
Los Angeles. The price of the day's I 

cursion is $3.00, exclusive of the autou 

bile and carriage rides and luncheon, 

RED STAR AUTO TOURS-Tin !;K 
word" in sight-seeing is the new plan 
the Southern I falifornia Sight-Seein Coi 
pany with its Red Star Auto Tours that 
are taken in fast, high-class, shaft drivi 
touring ear- having pneumatic tii ; , 
individual seats, each car arc.. nun, rlati . 
twelve persons only, including the Assist. 
;ini Traffic Manager who accompanii ea 
party t<» give accurate ami ini< istinj 
information, and whose dm \ it i- to make 

the trip both edncat r ial and enji \ \ t 

for the running: time is arranged i & 
opportunity for inspect ion of all the 
teresting things along the way. Tl 
delightful trips are Tour of the Loop 
($3.00), Orange Belt Special ($5.0t 
San Diego Limited ($10.00). Other > 

lar tours are the Harbor City Loop 
($3.00), Santa Barbara Coast Lin« Spe- 
cial ($8.50), San Fernando Valley and 
Acqueduct Line ($3.00), and those e 

neei ini: wiili «»i li«T motor lines o Si 

Diego for trips into the Imperial ;i!i 

or < )ld Mexico. 

The Tour of the I |» i- a del bti 

ride from Los Angeles to i lie s< a a 'I n 

turn, over line boulevards to Ocean I *ark. 

Venice and Santa Monica, the X ional 

ers' I tome, the Famous Busch F I 
( rardens, the < >s1 rich Farms and many 
<»ther interesting points. The ride tl 'ous 
picturesque San Gabriel, Verdug Sa 
Fernando and Cahuenga Valleys is speci- 
ally line. The route crosses Arroy< Seco 
at •• Devil's Gate" and traverses the au- 

tiful streets of 1 1 <> 1 1 \ w 1, the eelebrati 

Orange Grove Avenue at Pasadena, reach- 
ing the fines! residential section of the 
Crown Cit) " which can be besl seei only 

from a motor ear. 

The Orange Bell Special is all thai it* 
name implies, going as il does from Los 
Angeles to Redlands by Valley Boulevard 
and returning on the Foothill Boulevard 
through the srreatesl orange-producin see- 
tion of California— and the Red Star 
parties not only sec the orange trees 
weighted with luscious fruit, Inn are per- 
mitted to pick some with their own 
hands. Pomona, Ontario, Claremont, Glen- 
rtora, Riverside and Redlands, and man* 

t'ss notable places are reached bv tin* 



Soldi * 






,.,, drives up Roubidoux Mountain 
it* ",| ( . with ■ eaPP«d "Old 

,,?r fplain right, and up B»i ey 
Idy Redlands, are alone sufficient 



H tn P 



w " 



nil takinir — and no 



in 



„ eharge ifl '" 



ll( l e for either. At River- 



'''' ,,, famous Olenw I Mission Inn: 

''^ined arches, manj stained-glass win- 
P garden of bells and cloister num. 
■ • -; a ,,,..,,, old-world effect, 

till ' ' 1 ' i' 4 \ 

J"; ||( , liever forgets the music oi the 

mtm! or :in. i-i 

■'; tlll . route8 so briefly outlined 

',' oi ^1 for > my ■.■l..w..-, word 

l,,i space forbids, though the 
^r hl leading to the Exposition Citj 
Sonthern California 



and which every 



. , „ | w ish to tak( , we will describe 
,,' ni detail. This trip to San Die ? o 



u 

"'ll';' miles over smooth boulevards 

",, (11 -li mountain valleys and alon<r th< 
;1 is : , revelation to anj one, especially 

'jl 1( w itherto content with the cireum- 

ibed U< of a railway train. And not 

,] v [ g ery moment of this two-day trip 

jovabl but ii affords bo much additional 

; v l, of Soutl rn I alifornia » 

)urce s ial the traveler feels twice n 



i,l f or a ny expense attending it. Firsl 

walnut proves and tii 

occasional 



kst tl gnreal 



rented citrus proi es, with an 

p to ather some of the luscious : ut ; 

il 



tin iffh Anaheim, < >rai . Santa A.na 

that contains much 




a il Tustiu, a region 

inte | connected with the ur t su<rar 

leel hid stry, and over a portion of the 

-a< ranch after which Irvine Sta- 
ll, n is iimed. Shortly before noon the 

impressi) ol 1 ruin- of San Juan Capis- 

lano a reached, undoubtedly the Bnesl 
i all the Missions built in Califon ia, 
-ihI its liistory from the first building 
lis <lt- ruction by earthquake in 1812 fur- 

lislics many intere-tini: e\ \\\>, while the 

fcunvelous coloring of its tile"- and its ivy- 

Ireathed arches combine to form a picture 

|oi' unsurpassed beauty. 

Time is given for :l lunch at this point, 

hen sj eding on all are soon engrossed 

V the wonderful marine view that suu- 

enly unfolds as the car reaches Poinl 

pan Juan. For half a dozen miles tin 

" :l, l runs along the Palisach s, and for 

urty miles or more winds in and oul 

png the beach, finally coming to Ocean- 

; 1,1(< - where a stop is made to enjoj tin 

11( ' b eh of this quiet resort. Next 

•^liir-hy-the -Sea, with its two-mile long 

r a(, li whereon is the famous Children's 

f^vgTound; Del Mar. "the sho* place of 



the Pacific," with its unrivalled Stratford 
Inn and the rare Torrey pine thai grows 
nowhere else on earth; Scripp's Biological 
Station and its many queer specimens of 
marine life; La Jolla, with il carved elififs 
and silvery strand, and ii- seals bi king 
in the sun; then the drive around Mission 
Bay, pasl the Military Academy, and along 
Pacific Beach to Sau Diego and the land- 
locked tl Harbor of the Sun, ' ' while directly 
across the bay mav be seen Coronado, 

■ 

wit h the far-Ian ed Tent City and the 

Government forts and the aviation field. 
Of course a stop i> made at Ramona's 
Marriage Place, at the ruins of the old 
mission built by the Franciscans in 1769, 
ami at < Hd Town, to see the great cross 
dedicated !<• the n nory of Father Juni- 
pero Serra. Then passing the old Spanish 
church and jail, the route leads i to the 
midsi of the spL did business blocks and 
hotels of San Diego— that city wherein is 
magnificent Balboa Park, containing the 
ereat Exposition grounds on which lnm- 
i\wy\^ are laboring to create a veritable 
fairyland that shall be the Mecca of thou- 

sands in 1915. 

After securing lodgings, the evening 
affords time for a little view of the city, 

and next morning the party e ides at 

which point stops shall be made on the 
return which gives opportunity for re- 
touching the memory pictures gained on 
the out-going trip; and upon arrival in 
Lqs _\> _, [es, those who have taken all 
three of the Red Star Auto Tours are pre- 
sented with a lar: souvenir album, full oi 
1 m ,iful views which will prove a lasting 
reminder of what they - iw while speeding 
over 500 miles of boulevards in "Sunn> 

California. n 

0l] r eq U est a 10-day stop-over at San 

Di( can be arranged, or a return I 

boat with unlimited lav-over can be secun 
bv payment oi a small additional amount. 
The popularity of these motor trips is so 
reat that an early application for special 



"tes and reservations is advisable, and 
SeSoXn California , Sight-Seeing Com- 
', nv is always glad to forward their hand- 
some folded With detailed informatio. 
r,ln..- their Advance Panama-Pacific 
Char^ Membership Rate Tickets, which 
rive these tours al reduced ran-. _ 
" I,, choosing the eombined eleetne eai 

- '' '""■ '," ,, V.,^ FKH'tnc station 

2^"JllSta-S* Stop ..to 

s„„ ,„„;«' t,a„v Store, Colorado and 










** - 






3 ^i 

n 



■ f 







LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



I streets, Pasadena. The big blue 
; ,,w>l>il^ leaves tins store three turn- 

ff" ,, 10 a. .«,, 2 and 3:30 p. m. Th< 

d 7omobile covers about the some course 
. Pasadena as the trip by electric ear, 



aii( 



and fifteen 
lung. The 



TRIP 



Ending the principal features of the city 
1!1< , a s top of twenty minutes at Buseh ' 

Gardens. It consumes an hour 
minutes and is twelve miles 

,- e f or jhe whole round -trip is seventy- 
live cents. 

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY 
jjjjg excursion may be made by electric car 

r \ )} , i ..mobile. The route lies through 
( j ie Cahuenga Pass into the San Fernando 
Valley, through Lankershim, Van Nuys 
an d other pretty towns to the old San 
Fernando Mission and to the big dam of 

ihe Owens River Aqueduct. 

The electric car starts from the Hill 

Street station of the Pacific Electric (be- 
tween Fourth and Fifth streets). _ In leav- 
ing l, Angeles, Angel's Flighl is passed, 
a l s0 the forest of oil derricks in the 
northern pari of the city. The car passes 
throng the beautiful residence si rets of 

and Hollywood, then the way 

leads over the Santa Monica mountains 

throuj the picturesque Cahuenga Pass 
(see I huenga Pass and Cahuenga Valley) 
into t e wide-spread San Fernando Valley, 
a worn rful country, level as a floor from 
mountain range to mountain range. The 
soil holds moisture to a remarkable degree 



Colegrove 




and is wonderfully fertile. Once it was 
thought to be suitable only for grain; now 
it is cut up into small holdings and 
planted to peaches, pears, apricots, plums 
and walnuts, as well as to citrus fruit. 
Around the town of Lankershim the peach 
is extensively cultivated. Thousands of 
young trees have been set out. Lanker- 
shim is one of the older towns of the val- 
ley, but in improvements is as modern as 
i he newest. Fruit raising and canning are 
the principal industries. There is a pretty 
park near the Southern Pacific station. 
Van Nuys is soon reached, a well-grown 
city not three years old. cut out of a grain 
field, built to order and built right. The 
buildings are all excellent, many of them 
faced with white enameled brick, which has 
given Van Nuys the name of "The- White 
City." Headquarters of the American 
Beet Sugar Company were established here 
for the cultivation of sugar beets. Many 
acre- in the vicinity are planted to beets. 
During the season the district around 
Lankershim and Van Nuys furnishes the 
Los Angeles market daily with forty tons 
of watermelons of the finest quality. Sur- 
rounding* the town in all directions 



handsome countrv 



nie-paved corridor, San Fernando Mission 



in an directions are 
homes. The Southern 
Pacific maintains a very pretty park near 
its railroad station. The beautiful Sher- 
man Boulevard is one of the charming 
features of this valley. It is 15 miles long 
and 170 feet wide, with wide parking on 
both sides, planted with trees and orna- 
mental shrubs. It accommodates both the 
lectric road and an automobile driveway 
smooth as a floor and furnished all the 
way with ornamental electroliers. 

From Van Nuys the road turns to the 
old San Fernando Mission. This is now in 
private hands, but permission is granted 
to visit the ruins, which are very exten- 

They have been sufficiently restored 
by the Landmarks Club to keep from fur- 
ther deterioration. 

Several of the buildings are standing, 
the chapel and the so-called monastery 
and parts of others. The fine tile-paved 
arched corridor before the monastery is 
intact. In the courtyard before it is a 
laree fountain and basin. The deep, cool 
sTadows of the corridor and the splashing 
wate r must have been refreshing to priest 
m traveler as he journeyed from mission 

t0 mission, the only hospices in that 
sparsely settled land. The mam building 
c J ntains m any rooms, a library refectory, 
kitchen, and others below stairs whose espe- 
cial use is not known, and numerous cham- 



sive. 



mm 




LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



, streets, Pasadena. The big blue 

■ :l ; u n ,.iie leaves this store three time 

f![; mn ; 10 a. m., 2 and 3:30 p. m. The 
,l;1 ! '''i.iie covers about the sPtne course 
11,111 Wadena as the trip by electric car, 
Blading the principal features of the city 

o of twenty minutes at Busclrs 
It consumes an hour and fifteen 

twelve miles 



mid a 
Gardens. 

illU l,>s and is . , 

U V (1 , V(1 . the whole round-tnp is seventy- 
cents. 

SAN 



long. 



The 



ve 



FERNANDO VALLEY TRIP 



This 



excursion may he made by electric cat 
)1 , ."| )N automobile. The route lies through 
he Cahuenga Pass into the San Fernando 

ih rough Lankershim, Van Nuys 

towns to the old San 



dam of 



,/alley, 

U other pretty 
ernando Mission and to the bi 

lie 0\\ is River Aqueduct. 

The electric car starts from the II ill 
treet station of the Pacific Electric (be- 
tween Fourth and Fifth streets). In leav- 
ing U Angeles, Ang< l's Flighl is passed, 



lals«» 



the forest of oil derricks 



the 



m 

jorthi i pari of the city. The car passes 
through the beautiful residence streets of 
poles e and Hollywood, then the way 
eads over the Santr Monica mountains 
through the picturesque 



Pass 



___ ( m Cahuenga 

(see ( tuenga Pass and Cahuenga Valley) 
into the wide-spread San Fernando Valley, 
k wonderful country, level as a floor from 
fountain range to mountain range. The 

soil holds moisture to a remarkable degree 




and is wonderfully fertile. (Jure it was 
thought to be suitable only for grain; now 
it is cut up into small holdings and 
planted to peaches, pears, apricots, plums 

and walnuts, as well as to citrus fruit. 
Around the town of Lankershim the peach 

is extensively cultivated. Thou mid. of 

young trees have been set out. Lanker- 
shim is one of the older towns of the val- 
ley, but in improvements is as modern as 
the newest. Fruit raising and canning are 
the principal industries. There is a pretty 
park near the Southern Pacific station. 
Van Nuys is soon reached, a well-grown 
city not three years old, cut out of a grain 
field, built to order and built right. The 
buildings are all excellent, many of them 
faced with white enameled brick, which has 
•jiven Van Nuys the name of "The* White 
City." Headquarters of the American 
Beet Sugar Company were established here 
for the cultivation of sugar beets. Many 
acres in the vicinity arc planted to beets. 
During the season the district around 
Lankershim and Van Nuys furnishes the 

■ 

Los Angeles market daily with forty tons 
of watermelons of the finest quality. Sur- 
rounding the town in all directions are 
handsome country horn.-. The Southern 
Pacific maintains a very pretty park near 
its railroad station. The beautiful Sher- 
man Boulevard is one of the charming 
features of this valley. It is 15 miles long 
and 170 feet wide, with wide parking on 
both sides, planted with trees and orna- 
mental shrubs. Tt accommodates both the 
electric road and an automobile drivewaj 
smooth as a floor and furnished all the 
way with ornamental electroliers. 

From Van Nuys the road turns to the 
old San Fernando Mission. This is now in 
private hands, but permission is granted 
to visit the ruins, which are very ext 

They have been sufficiently restored 
by the Landmarks Club to keep from fur- 
ther deterioration. 

Several of the buildings are standing, 
the chapel and the so-called monastery 
and parts of others. The fine tile-paved 
arched corridor before the monastery is 
intact. In the courtyard before it is a 
arge fountain and basin. The deep, cool 

Shadows of the corridor and the splashing 

water must have been refreshing to priest 
^traveler as he journeyed from mission 
o mission, the only hospices in that 



en- 



sive. 



The main building 






Til 



e-paved corridor, San Fernando Mission 



or 

t 

snarselv settled land. 

Sins many rooms, a library, refectory, 
ggj and others below stairs whose espe- 

s, is nut known, and numerous cham- 



. 



■*■ 



■"■*; * 



^Ma^ 



i« 









LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 























am 



m 



FOUNTAIN— SAX FERNANDO MISSION 



bers above. Portions of old adobe walls here 
and there suggest the original plan of the 
establishment and demonstrate more than 
any other of the missions the great scope 
of' the work undertaken by the padres. 
The buildings aggregated more than a mile 
and a half in length. Like sentinels guard- 
ing the buildings, stand two century-old 
palm trees visible at a great distance. In 
1791 Father Lasuen, following out the de- 
sign of Father Serra to establish a chain 
of missions about a day's journey apart, 
selected a spot in this fertile valley and 
with Father Dumetz founded, in honor of 
Ferdinand V, King of Castile and Aragon, 
the Mission of San Fernando Key de 
Espagna. The initial expense was borne 
jointly by Charles IV of Spain and the 
Marquis of Branceforte. It soon became 
successful both from a spiritual and ma- 
terial point of view. In 1826 an inventory 
shows that, besides immense flocks and 
herds, there were in the warehouse $90,000 
i» specie and merchandise. After seculari- 
zation an immense tract of land which con- 
fined the mission buildings fell into the 
hands of General Andres Pico, who made 
{he treaty with Fremont at the Cahuenga 
p ass in 1847. In 1846 General Pico sold 



the 



ranch 
$14,000. 



to 



ii tu Eulogia F. de Celis _ for 
ipi^uuu. For many years though divided 
among different later owners, the ranch 
was one immense wheat *»* A *™™+* 
thousand acres 



field. 



of the north side 
with their crud 
the soil was won 



twenty 

in wheat being no un- 
common sight. Later divisions have re- 
duced the size of the holdings to small 
farms, except some sixteen thousand 
acres now belonging to the San Fernando 
Mission Land Company, which surround 
the old San Fernando Mission buildings. 
The padres, with their usual good judg- 
ment, selected for the mission lands the 
almost frostless slopes 
of the valley. Even 
methods of agriculture — ~-~ - 
derfully productive and San Fernando was 
known as among the most prosperous ot 

the missions. ... 

After going through buddings, visiting 
the old graveyard of the padres, noticing 
the remains "of the cactus hedge and 
adobe wall that once surrounded the en- 
closure, one may view the huge dam o 
the Owens river aqueduct, part oi the 
o-reat engineering work which is to sup- 
l v Los Angeles with water. (See Aque- 
duct) . Owensmouth is another brand new 
town and is destined, in the development 





h 




IF 









^^■v" 



■'-.»■■■■•■■■■.' 



w* »P 



H 



■n 







- 






















LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 





*I 



m 



a 



, • 







M • 




YOUNG ORANGE AND LEMON GROVES ON SAX FERNANDO MISSION LANDS 

RESULTS OF OWENS RIVER WATER 



FIRST 



through 



of the valley, to become an important 
shipping point. Sherman Way, the beau- 
tiful boulevard mentioned above, passes 

the town and forms its main 
street. From Owensmouth the return 
trip begins. If it is the right season a 
stop should be made among the poppy 
fields where one may have the pleasure 
of picking all he wishes to carry. Return- 
ing through Hollywood, a stop should be 
made at the artistic Arts and Crafts 
Shop. 



SANTA CATALINA ISLAND 

miles off the Los 



Ang 



—Twenty 
harbor is 
Santa Catalina Island, twenty-three miles 
long, with an average width of four miles 
in the southern part, and two miles in 
the northern. Its highest point is three 
thousand feet above the sea. About five 
miles from the northern end is a de- 
pression running nearly across the island, 
forming a cove on either side. The con- 
necting strip of land is only about thirty 
feet high, and hills rising' from two to 
three thousand feet on each side make it 
appear at a distance like two very high 
islands. There are several fair harbors 
on the coast; inland are deep gorges, 
mountains and rocky precipices. The "cli- 
mate is mild and equable, with little fog 
and low humidhy. The island possesses 
many attractions; mountain drives, pic- 
turesque golf links, salt water bathing, 
sulphur springs, hunting and fishing 
grounds, and the wonderful marine gar- 
dens, which are revealed through the 
glass-bottomed boats. Avalon, a pic- 



turesque town around the erescent-shapi 
harbor, is a very popular summer i sort, 

and no visit to Los Angeles is con plete 
without a trip to Santa Catalina 1 ami. 

The daily steamer leaves I^<>s Ai -. 
harbor ai 10 a. m. (subject to eh -c 

and reaches Avalon at 12:30. 

The trip to the harbor may be made 
either by Pacific Electric (Sixth and Main 
streets station), Southern Pacific Railroad 
(Arcade station), or Salt Lake route 
(First Street station). The shortesl time 

is made by Pacific Electric, which 1 aves 
at 9:15 (subject to change). The steamer 
leaves Avalon on the return trip ai 3:30 
p. m. This gives time to visil the aquar- 
ium, bath house, curio stores and other 

places of interest, to see the marine gar- 
dens and to explore a little. For fish- 
ing, coaching and other pleasures a longer 
stay must be made. The Hermosa and 
Cabrillo are two safe ocean-going steamers 

which make the daily passage bet ecu 
the mainland and the* island. The decks 

are well provided with seats, for almosi 
every one wishes to sit outside. The 

vessel steams past the great breakwater 

of San Pedro harbor, past Dead Man's 
Island (so named because soldiers slain 
in the battle at Dominguez between Gilles- 
pie and the Spanish were buried there), 
rounds the lighthouse and reaches the 

() pen ocean, heading for that misty range 

of mountains that skirts the horizon. 
Bluer and bluer grows the water, and 
clearer and clearer the mountains emerge 
from the misty veil, until their sharp 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



Ljlines 



In a momenl the 

. ; s surrounded by a fleel of small 



owners shouting 



through 



and niu'-^'d, wrinkled sides are 
j 7 visible. A Taint cloud wreaths 

» all iii*es1 peak and a pearly drift is tin 

f',' ;,,.h1 against which they stand. 

r ] ft semicircular Bay of Avalon i 

111 defined and, as the vessel draw 

r' t he piers and background of 

r ,. ' a cur io stores with houses climb- 
L the l.m behind. - 

Igicamei 

rl (s their 

Lapliuiies that theirs, be it motor-boat, 
1 ° ar-propelled, offers the only means of 
Ling the submarine gardens successfully. 
f l ar i r boat, equipped with a search- 
L,t '"■ nounces an evening trip to the 

ground of the flying fish, or a day- 

Ut trip to the seal rocks. ( A Hawaiian 
|urf rider dashes past on his surf board 

,,,,} to a motor-boat. Sun-browned boys 

I re i). fing ?"V c«»ins which they dive 

|or when thrown into the water. Par 
Lvn into the clear depths one can fol- 
low the shining silver dime before it is 
Teized by the diver, who never misses it. 
midsl i his crowd <>f boats and boys 
[ecompanied by the shoutii megaphones, 
he vessel draws up to the dock. Every- 
ne is hungry for luncheon and as soon 

s that is over, those whose stay is brief 
asten to the pier for a -lass-bottomed 

oat. The Emperor, a large motor-boat 
ritli a glass bottom, is making ready to 
o out, with a load, but though this 

lakes a longer trip, many prefer the 
mall bo; s. The marine gardens are 

uicklv reached and the wonders revealed 

hrough the cl< r water are never to be 

iorgotten. The boatman tells you the 
opular names for these waving masses 
f marine foliage, as different from each 

ther as the shrubbery in a garden of 



»■»-. 






»■ 



\%t 











0S A t P*eles J I arbor (San Pedro) where the ships of 
tne Orient and Occident find safe anchor 




Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, most famous fishir 

r >rt in the world, 27 miles from the mainland 

earth. There are ladii ' feather boas, 
ribbon sea weed, sea tomatoes, sea heather, 
mermaids' hair or dulse, and iodine kel 
like trees, bearing silver balls as fruit, 
waving gently to and fro as the ears stir 

the water. 



old 



And in and out are darting 

and hi ue 



perch and blue perch and electric 
perch, all colors of the rainbow and bril- 
liant like jewels. There are sea cucum- 
bers, too. and sea urchins. Here and 

is phosphorescent. It i 
a case mating vision. Returning- to the 
town, the aquarium is to be visited, the 

curio -lores and other interesting 1 spots. 
The fishing at Catalina Island is famous. 
The 



., too, and sea 
there the wate 

fascinating 



leaping tuna. 

to two hundred 



weighing 



from eighty 

and fifty pounds is tl; 
hardest fighting game fish known, and is 
ea ii-l it with rod and reel only in Catalina 
waters. Sword fish, also splendid fighter 
are caught, here, albicore and yellowtail, 
black and white sea bass and many other 
fish. Power launches, especially built an 
equipped for sea fishing, can always 1 
secured at Avalon. 

Besides fishing the Catalina wild goat 
offers good sport for those who enjoy 
hunting*. The mountain coach rides are 

diversion and afford 



wonderful 

Golf and 
mountain 

Boating 

But 



another 

views of the island and sea, 
tennis entertain many, and 

limbing yields glorious views. 

and bathing are other attractions. 
all these things are for those who spend 
more than a few hours on the island. 
Another sea trip of two and a half hours 

and the steamer is rounding- San Pedro 

breakwater again. 6:45 and the Pacific 
Bleetrie car enters Los Angeles T e 
n.-ice of the round trip is $2.75. lfae 
fare for the glass-bottomed boat is fatty 

cents. 






If 






, -* 



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n\ 






■ ,*>> 




4k 



•, >- I 



l^ia 








HOW AND WHERE 



TO 



live! 



LOS ANGELES-SAN 1)11 10 STANDARD nUIDJ 



IN 



CALIFORNIA 



The man who makes two chickens grow 
where there were no feathers before, is even 
better than the man who makes two blades ot 
grass grow where none grew before. Making 
it possible for small poultry growers to develop 
their business and buy their homes at the same 
time, letting the hen buy the land, is even a 
greater accomplishment. Plymouth Acres in 
the southwest, in the direction in which Los 
Angeles is growing so rapidly toward the sea, 
is but a short distance from Los Angeles, and 
a still shorter distance from Redondo. Hall 
acres and acres, ideally located for chicken 
raising, truck gardening, small homes, are sold 
at such low prices and such easy terms that one 
finds opportunity for immediate returns m a 
pleasant, profitable business, at the same time 
investing in land squarely in the path of Los 
Angeles' growth and therefore benefiting in the 
great increase in property values in Los Angeles. 
All these acres and half acres offer opportunity 
for later subdivision into lots and consequent 
profits much beyond the increase in value of 
eastern or middle west realty. 

To those whose ambition is to own a beach 
home in the very arm of the Pacific Ocean, with 
nothing but gentle breezes and the sunlit 
waters of this mighty ocean between them and 
China, Seal Beach and Seal Beach Court 
offer that opportunity. Thousands have longed 
for the day when it would be possible to have a 
beach home, either for the summer or for all 
the year round, and in this fortunate place, 
Nature has done everything to make a beach 
home ideal. Seal Beach is located 4 1-2 miles 
south of Long Beach between two great still 
water bays — Alamiios on the west and Anaheim 
on the east, with a mile and a quarter of the 
safest, cleanest, balmiest beach known on the 
Pacific. Children old enough to walk are safe 
in the gentle surf, which is absolutely devoid 
of undertow. Hundreds of thousands of 
dollars have been invested in this property by 
discriminating investors and thousands more 
are purchasing there now. Fine transportation, 
good water, splendid accommodations of every 
sort, make it the ideal family beach free from 
the unpleasant things that spoil Nature and 
offend refined people. 

"BROOKLYN"— WEST, located on Wash- 
ington Boulevard within echo distance of the 
city limits of Los Angeles, westward on the 
great highway to Venice and the sea, offers to 
the newcomer and the home seeker an ideal 
location with a wonderful panoramic view of 
Mt. Baldy and its sister mountains, with an 
ideal climate, large lots, fine improvements, 
splendid parkings, delightful surroundings and 
\e best of transportation. Prices are low and 



an investment is sure to multiply and grow 
for Los Angeles is speedily growing westward 
along the Venice Short Line. With the com 
pleting of the subway, it will be a solid city 
from the business center to the shores of tie 
Pacific. The subway line will bring "BROOK- 
LYN M -WEST within fifteen minutes of ttj 
very business center of Los Angeles. 

LOS ANGELES HARBOR offers to tliei 
shrewd and discriminating investor a great 
opportunity similar to that given to those 
pioneers who came to Los Angeles eighteen or 
twenty years ago. Only in this case the opporj 
tunity is secured and guaranteed by the growth 
of Los Angeles and the enormous sums already' 
poured into the harbor, the opening of thel 
Panama Canal and the development of market 
industries in and around Los Angeles. Inas-I 
much as Los Angeles will serve eight great] 
states for freight and passengers, and to sen 
their produce to all parts of the world, invest] 
ment in good harbor property can be recom- 
mended without reservation. I 

RIVERBANK is one of the fastest growing 
towns in the San Joaquin Valley. Right in 
the center of Stanislaus County, the banner 
dairy county of California, it is surrounded 
by 400,000 acres of well-irrigated land and 
here the land owns the water. Riverbank has 
now a population of over a thousand, schools, 
theatres, churches, electric lights, gas, sewers, 
and splendid water. It has a model chicken 
farm and with its splendid markets and its 
fine development offers great opportunity for 
poultry ranches, 5 and 10-acre truck and berry 
places, and 20 and 40-acre alfalfa and dairy 
farms. 

The above properties are handled by the 
Guy M. Rush Co., 901-5 Story Bldg., Los 
Angeles, Sixth and Broadway, who are members 
of the Los Angeles Realty Board, California 
State Realty Federation, Los Angeles Chamber 
of Commerce. They handle nothing but the 
very best property of its kind. Inquiries at 
any bank in Los Angeles will reveal their 
excellent standing. Information regarding 
Los Angeles or Southern California will be 
given by the Guy M. Rush Co. without any 
obligation on the part of the person seeking 
information, and prospective investors making 
inquiry there may be assured a sense of security 
that it is gratifying to the North American 
Press Association. We endorse this company 
and recommend it. We suggest that those 
seeking to locate in Los Angeles, call up w 
office or telephone Broadway 24 or Home 60P 
for complete information, not only regarding 
the properties above described, but regarding 
any properties in Southern California. 



TRIANGLE TROLLEY TRIP— This is 
ie of tlu 1 I'aciflc Electric trips, an all- 
l v trip of one hundred miles for $1.00, 
j\Kj a two-hour stop at Long Beach and 
* short stop at Santa Ana. For thirty 
1 ;] ( >s < lie route is along the ocean shore 
and it includes ten beach resorts. The 
last car leaves the Pacific Electric station 

at Sixth and Main streets at 0:30 a. in. 
From bos Angles the way is southeast 

through large dairy farms and agricul- 
tural sections towards Santa Ana. To 
the north are the walnut groves of the 

surrounding Whit tier and the 



district 

I train passes by the Olinda oil district. 

■ Near Santa Ana are fields of susrar beets 

land several ureat beet sugar factories. 

ISanta Ana is the county seai <»f Orange 
Cmnty, a charming city of 12,000 popula- 
tion. As in nearly all Southern Cali- 
fornia towns, the public school system 
is abreast of the population, with seven 




n street in Santa Ana, the ruling citv of the vegetable 
and sugar beet kingdom adjacent to Los Angeles 



Do- 



jrammar schools, two high schools, 
jnestic Science and Manual Training 
Niool and plans proposed for a $200,000 
Mytechnifl school. There are churches 
* all t he leading denominations with 
pe church homes, club houses and lodge 
mildin^s, a handsome court house, a 
il) rary building-, an< j a progressive busi- 
es section. There are several large 
jjgar factories, a cannery, packing houses, 
f la ning m iH s and lumber yards, and 
Fious other industries. The ocean, only 
P^Ive nules away, tempers the climate, 
JJJ extremes of heat or cold are un- 
r° Wn : All kinds of semi-tropical fruits 

LJ^f ln the vicinit y in great abun- 

; ^i grapes, olives, dates and 

« ava s; and Orange County is famous for 




A near view of the celery industry of Orange < unty, 

near Los Angeles 



its Valencia and St. Michael oranges, to 
which it seems peculiarly adapted. 

Santa Ana is the commercial center of 

the .ureal est beet sugar industry in the 
world, and it leads all other towns in tin 
shipments of English walnuts. After 
boarding the train airain the wav turn 

south ami strikes the coast at Huntington 
Beach. Southeast of Huntington Beach 
are other beaches not included in the or- 
ganized trips, but easily reached. Newport 

Beach, Balboa and Lamina Beach ar 
some of them. 

At Huntington Beach the route lies be- 
tween the ocean and a row of palm fcr< s. 
Here are pretty summer bouses and hand 
some all-the-vear homes, and Huntingdon 
Inn, a charming hotel. From here the 
way skins the shore in a northwesterly 
direction, passing the club house and duck 
shooting preserves of the Bolsa Chico Qui. 
Club, and through numerous beach r< 
sorts, Sunset Beach, S ial Beach, Alam, 
tos Bay and Naples among them. Nap] 




Long lU-ach, city of the Silvery Strand. 1 tutiful 
homes, marvelous growth and industry 






* 












i. 











at 







Beach 
Offers 




Throng of pleasure seekers in front of Long Beach bath house, Long Beach 



A climate unexcelled both winter or summer. Beau- 
tiful homes. Twenty-seven fine churches. Twelve 
schools costing over $1,000,000. Three beautiful 
parks. A Carnegie Library with 25,000 volumes. 
A municipal water system. A modern sewer system. 
Thirty miles of paved streets. 



A superb harbor on which $1,250,000 has been 
spent. Free municipal docks. Six ban^s with re- 
sources of $9,000,000 and deposits of $7,500,000. 
Wonderful commercial opportunities. Clean amuse- 
ments. Free municipal band concerts. A four-mile 
Walk of Ten Thousand Lights. 



Long Beach is a great summer resort, and a great winter resort. It is a city of fine citizenship. The building 
permits last year were $4,500,000. The assessed property valuation is $30,000,000. 

Long Beach has two steam railroads, a network of electric railroads, cheap power, a low tax rate, contented labor, 
cheap factory sites, eight banks, and a dozen other assets of first importance. 

Long Beach plans a $1,000,000 municipal pleasure pier; miles upon miles of paved streets; more municipal docks; 
new hotels and apartment houses; important harbor improvements; new factories. 



The industries here include 



Salt works 
Glass factory 
Lumber mills 



Brick yards 

Wagon factories 

A shipbuilding plant 



Yacht, launch and engine works 
Rug and carpet factory 
Novelty factory 



Railroad utilities factory 
Tent and awning factory 
Harness factory 



Shell factory 
Mattress factory 
$2,000,000 electric plant 

Ice factory 
Flour mill 
Cement works 

Cabinet works 

Sash and door factory 

Room for other industries 



Write 



R. L. BISBY 

Secretary 

Chamber of 

Commerce 

Long Beach 

California 




One of the fine homes at Long Beach 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



. a five-mile system of canals, whose 
banks are dotted with pretty homes, a 

dern hotel and two eafes noted for 

their Sunday dinners. The San Gabriel 

iver fl« ws into the ocean at Naples. The 

Llm-bordered streets of Bay City look 

yery attractive as the train passes on to 




Balboa Island and Newport Bay, where one may find 
ideal still and rough water boating, bathing and fishing 



Lung Beach, where a two hours' stop is 
Irnacle. Luncheon is the first considera- 
tion and there are many good cafes near 
at hand. A short way up the street is 
the beautiful Virginia Hotel, where food 
and service are of the best. This hotel 
has a superb location overlooking the 
ocean, and is entered by a palm-bordered 
approach. With ivied Avails, terraced 
sunken gardens, a paved tennis court with 
the ocean rolling on its borders, it is a 
most attractive place. (See Notable Hotels.) 
Long Beach is a popular summer resort, 
but also a thriving city of permanent 
homes. The population 'is about 45,000. 
It has direct communication with Los 
Angeles by the Southern Pacific Railroad 
and San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt 
Lake Railroad, as well as by Pacific Elec- 
tric. Its industries are varied, including 
a ship building plant, a glass insulator 
factory, the Star Drilling Machinery Com- 
pany, large lumber yards and the Union 
Oil Refinery. There are twenty-seven 
churches, some with congregations of over 
a thousand and nearly all with handsome 
buildings. The fine "school buildings in- 
clude a new $250,000 Polytechnic High 
School There is a beautiful public li- 
brary building set in a pretty park and 
[we are # miles and miles of beautiful 
pomes lining paved and shaded streets. 
u cean Front Boulevard extends for five 



miles 



along 



Boulevard extends for 
the bluffs over the beach. 



The Beach Drive extends for ten miles 
along the bay shore. Five parks, besides 
the children's playgrounds, provide rec- 
reation for the permanent population, 
while the summer residents find delight 
in the beach, the Walk of Ten Thousand 
Lights, and the Pike, with its bath house 
and hundreds of amusement features. 
There is a $100,000 double decked amuse- 
ment pier running out into the sea eigh- 
teen hundred feet, at whose outer end is 
an immense glassed-in sun parlor; at the 
land end is a great auditorium, over- 
looking the Pike and beach, thronged with 
sight-seers and pleasure seekers. 

After leaving Long Beach the train passes 
through Wilmington and on to San Pedro 
and Point Firmin. These are all described 
in alphabetical order in the body of this 
book. A considerable stop is made at 
San Pedro, giving time for a walk and 
rest in the pretty park which borders 

i Then 

the route turns north to Los Angeles, 

passing through Compton and other pretty 
little towns to Watts, and from there on 
over the same route as in the morning. 
Los Angeles is reached about 6 p. m. For 
all the Pacific Electric trips, it is well 
to engage seats beforehand, though it is 
not usually strictly necessary. They may 
be engaged by telephoning to the infor- 
mation bureau in the Pacific Electric 
Building at Sixth and Main streets, or by 
applying in person. Besides these special 



Point Firmin along the ocean cliff. 







Craig shipbuilding plant at Long Beach one of the 

many Southern California industries 

organized trips, there are other .interest- 
ing towns and localities to be visited in 
the vicinity of Los Angeles. It is pos- 
sible to see nearly the whole country in 
lids vicinity with great ease by the Pacific 
Electric system. 



*MTk 










OAKLAND 




City 




Homes 




California Bungalow in Dutton Manor 



KENWOOD 



MANOR 



districts, within twenty minutes of the city of Oakland, on the new 
Southern Pacific Electric Service. 



restricted. SEND US YC 

WILL TELL YOU HOW 



High-class improvements and well 

WE 



Subdivisions of large and small tracts in both city and cpuntry our 
specialty. No proposition too small or too large to receive our attention. 

If you are interested in Oakland and California, do not fail to place 
yourself in communication with our firm. 



answered, and maps sent upon application. 



All inquiries cheerfully 



Dealers and Brokers in High-class Residence properties. 







REAL ESTATE 



■%*%. 






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T 7J 



LEWIS & MITCHELL 

INCORPORATED 



■:■■ ■■ ■ ■ .,.•■■■ 



**$»»* 



INSURANCE 



1520 Broadway, Oakland, California 










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Valley 







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Elberta Peaches raised at Denair 

Stanislaus County 



F 
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Largest small farm deal 



ers in 



Joaq 



Less than one hundred miles from the city of San Francisco and 
Oakland on main lines of the Southern Pacific and Santa Fe rail- 



roads. Th 



M 



We 



will be glad to submit any size farm that you may wish, 
with literature descriptive of this beautiful valley upon application. 

Dealers and Brokers in Irrigated Farms. 




1520 Broadway, Oakland, California 





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SEE IT ALL WITH US 



POINT LOMA 

i ^u « „„«- v, n uWarri<; in the country and must be taken to be appre- 

The trip to Point Loma is over one of the fnest boul evards £ e cou™/s fitti climax> a t the extreme 

ciated. With its ever changing panorama it is a trip of w™^™ £ on * ' may look over the Pacific Ocean on 

end of the Point, on a crest of a P™™ "^^^ Diew Corona'do and the Coronado Islands in the fore. 

°g?o e u h nd nt an a d n r m'agntce' l^^^'^ti^^tion) of Old Mexico, with their ever changmg 

•**&£&%&*• the exclusive privilege o^jng our ca ^* S £^ 

szr^^^^^ Mexican Light House ' built in 1769> 

and ^ e re N |r.00? V Carieave^OO^^M'. and 2:00 P. M. Trip mmires 2 1-2 hours. 

TIA JUANA, OLD MEXICO 

A trip into a foreign land is f^y^ Sme foXchti* 

Inhour rTTara d na Cm O g ld e Me°x"c o *K LTvlew^exicans t? their own country, send post cards and 

^SSSfensar src^KfflSAras wa»-A« 

Gran Fa?e°, te $i.50. Cars leave at 9 A. M. and 2 P. M. Return at 1 and 6 P. M. Distance 40 miles round trip. 

SEEING SAN DIEGO 

San Diego is built as an amphitheatre, overlooking its two bays, with a background of Point Loma, C oro- 

nad Ytrip aboufthe business and residential portion of San Diego is well worth the effort, giving one an idea 
of the change that a few years have wrought— structurally. 

After a trip through the business and residential section, one is taken to our 1400 acre Balboa Park, the 
site of the Panama-California Exposition, which will be held in 1915, continuing over the beautiful park drives 
with stops of a few minutes at various view points, we return by the way of Chinatown, and a portion of the 
wholesale district and waterfront of San Diego. 

Fare, 75 cents. Cars leave 10:30 A. M. Return 12 noon. 

SAN DIEGO MISSION 

Historically, San Diego presents many points of interest, and oldest among these is the San Diego Mission, 

the first Mission erected in the state. 

Father Junipero Serra finished the work in July of 1769, and from this start spread the work of erecting a 

chain of 21 Missions along the coast. 

The Mission today is but a remnant of the imposing structure erected 140 years ago. Enough remains 
to show the character of the structure, and one of the bells brought from Spain at the time of the dedication. 

Olive trees that were planted during the erection of the Mission are still bearing. This is one of the most 
photographed points in the state, for it was here that civilization started on the Pacific Coast. 

Fare, $1.00. Cars leave 2 P. M. Return 4:30 P. M. 

A BAY TRIP 

A trip about the bay in a finely appointed yacht with every convenience for a pleasurable visit to the points 
of interest along the shore. 

See the work being done by the city in building municipal wharfs; the most unique yacht club quarters 
on the coast; the trans-Pacific freighters unloading; the manufacturing and industrial section of the city; the 
monster log rafts; gun-boat-row, where some of Uncle Sam's fighters are always anchored; the national aviation 
field; the Quarantine and Coaling Stations; Fort Rosecrans and Fort Pio Pico. 

Fare, 50 cents. Sight Seeing Cars leave U. S. Grant Hotel 2:15 P. M. for this trip. 

SAN DIEGO SIGHT SEEING CO. 

Office: Main Entrance U. S. Grant Hotel 







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■■ 



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PANAMA CALIFORNIA 
EXPOSITION 



1915 



SAN 



DIEGO 



9 



CALIFORNIA 



Th 



e 



Exposition City in 1915 




No one who visits Los Angeles should fail 
to go to San Diego, and this for several im- 
portant reasons. First, because the trip 
is a delightful one whether by water or 
by rail, and if it is made by rail there 
are two of the most important and most 
interesting of the old missions to be vis- 
ited on the way. Second, to all Ameri- 
cans, and especially to Californians, San 
Diego should possess an absorbing interest, 
as it was here that California history 
began. Here Cabrillo, the first of the 
Spanish navigators, landed in 1542, Vis- 
caino followed early in the next century 
and here in 1769 was planted the first 
of the Franciscan missions in Alta Cali- 
fornia, the first white man's settlement 
on our western coast. Third, San Diego 
is in itself a very attractive city, with 
its equable, sunny climate of moderate 



temperature; its handsome buildings and 

chavmiiur homes; its picturesque situation, 
rising gradually from the hay which it 

half encircles; and with the many delight- 
ful excursions of which it is the base. And 

fourth, because it is. the site of a unique 

vear 'round exposition, which will com- 
memorate in 1915 the opening of th< 
Panama Canal and call the attention of 
the world to ils own situation as the 
first American port of call, The beauti- 
ful buildings of this exposition are fast 

. . • ii-- — «.>f nart which is tae 

m 



rising 



the great park which is 



heart of the city. 

For all these reasons the toiuist can 
readily see that he cannot afford to over- 
, •.,„ Diego From Los Angeles the 
water Spmafbe made by either of two 
nes The steamers President and Cov- 
er Sr of the Pacific Coast Steamship Com- 



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SAILING ON SAN DIEGO BAY 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



n y leave Los Angeles harbor Wednes- 
day and Saturday mornings at 10:30, ar- 
ching in San Die »° at 5 p * m ' Return " 
. t hey leave San Diego Wednesday and 

Saturday evenings at 11 o'clock, reach- 
ing San Pedro at 6 a. m. Thursday and 
Sunday mornings. 

The Los Angeles ticket office of the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company is at 540 
South Spring Street. The San Diego 
office is at Third and D streets. 

The steamers Harvard and Yale of the 
Pacific Navigation Company leave Los 
Angeles harbor for San Diego at 3:30 
p. m. on Thursdays and Saturdays, arriv- 
ing in San Diego at 8:30 p. m. Return- 
ing they leave San Diego from the Santa 
p e wharf on Fridays and Sundays at 8 
a. m., arriving in San Pedro at 1 p. m. 



The Los Angeles ticket office of this com- 
pany is at 611 South Spring Street, and 
the' San Diego office at 1200 D Street. 

The steamers of both these lines are 
handsome, commodious vessels and the 
short ocean trip is a delightful one for 
those who love the water. It affords a 
fine view of Los Angeles harbor, Dead 
Man's Island, of Terminal Island, where 
is the club house of the South Coast Yacht 
Club, of Point Firmin and then the 
steamer passes the great breakwater and 
is in the open sea. Entering San Diego 
harbor a few hours later the steamer 
glides between the breakwater and the 
long; arm of Point Loma. 
the guns of Fort Rosecrans, rounds the 
aviation field of North Island (not 
an island), passes the opening of 
ish Bight, which 



It passes under 



cut 



really 
Span- 
North 
up at 



6i 



WONDERLAND^, OCEAN BEACH 



so nearly 
Island from Coronado, and brings 
San Diego. 

The trip by rail takes about four hours, 
hut at least one stop should be made en 
route, at San Juan Capistrano. The mis- 
sion being close by the station a stop- 
over between trains gives ample time to 
en Joy it. Unfortunately, there is no 
schedule by which both San Juan Capis- 
trano and San Luis Rev can be visited, 
and San Diego reached from Los Angeles, 
in the same day. San Luis Rey is about 
four miles from the station at Oceanside 
and there is not time between afternoon 
trains to take the drive, visit the mission 
and return, so, unless one wishes to stay 
overnight at Oceanside, it is better to 
visit one mission on the way to San Diego 
a nd the other on the way back. If the 
hme can be spared, or if one is on pleas- 



a 



ure bent, a stay overnight, or for « 
longer period, at the delightful Stratford 
Inn at Del Mar will repay one. From 
the train one has glimpses of this charm- 
ing hotel facing the sea. 
The Santa 



Fe 



Angeles 



emerges 



coast line serves San 
Diego from Los Angeles. For the various 
trains it is best to consult a time table. 
A convenient train leaves Los 
at 9:10 a. m. Almost as soon as it 

from the city orange blossoms 
perfume the air and the beautiful ever- 
green trees with their golden fruit are 
seen on either hand. Then follow large 
fields of sugar beets, and alternating wal- 
nut and orange groves, with occasional 
homes, hedged in and embowered with 
roses. Distant mountain ranges limit the 
vision. ^ The dry bed of the San Gabriel 
river is seen now and then. At Santa 
Ana a beautiful little park, filled with 
pansies and roses surrounds the station. 
Big alfalfa fields spread their vivid green 
over the levels, then the gray-green of 
olive orchards which give way to gently 
swelling hills, some green or golden with 
grain, or, perhaps, freshly reaped, all em- 
broidered with the delicate, feathery, 
golden mustard, in places man-high, re- 
calling Ramona making her way through 
the featherv fronds to meet Father Sal- 

« 

viclea coming from San Luis Rey. 

At eleven San Juan Capistrano is 
reached. From the train can be seen the 
hio'h walls of the ancient church. It is 
but a step from the pretty modern sta- 



tion of mission 



design to the 



cloistered 



the 



golden 



quadrangle and ruined nave of this splen- 
did church of long ago. Gazing on them 
the mind rushes back over the years to 

days of this great establish- 
ment. The church was undoubtedly the 
finest of all the mission structures in Cali- 
fornia. The size, the material of which 
it was made, mainly stone and mortar, 
the carved pilasters, capitals, keystones 
and lintels, all attest its former magnifi- 
cence, while the large patio, the buildings 
which enclose it and remains of other 
buildings are present-day witnesses to the 
size and importance of the establishment. 
The first founding of the mission, on Oc- 
tober 30, 1775, was interrupted by news 
of the destruction by Indians of the mis- 
sion at San Diego. A cross was erected 
to mark the spot where mass had been 
celebrated under a rude shelter of boughs, 
the bells for the new mission were buried 
and priests and soldiers hastened to San 









I 



■ ■ 



FU 



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Your Los Angeles Banking 




Connections 

Let the German American be your Los Angeles Bank. 
You will find our Service thorough, courteous and efficient. 
The welcome you will receive here will be genuine. Make 
this Bank your headquarters — feel at liberty to use the 
public telephones, rest rooms, etc. 

CAPITAL and RESERVE $2,000,000.00 

Four per cent interest paid on "Term" Savings Ac- 
counts— 3 per cent interest paid on a special class of Savings 
Account with checking privileges — Department for unre- 
stricted Checking Accounts — complete Trust Service — un- 
equaled Safe Deposit facilities — transportation to any part of 
the world may be procured from the German American 
Steamship Agency. 



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Bankgeschafte jeder Art — Spareinlagen 
und Scheckverkehr — Pflegschaf ten und 
Nachlassverwaltungen — Feuerf estes Ge- 

wolbe. 

Service de banque complet — Service des 
livres et d'epargne — Service pour depot— 
Caisse de depot et consignations. 



German rfmeric&ii 

SPRING * SEVENTH STS. LOS ANGELES 





THIS COUPON 

when presented 

at Window No. 35 

is good for one 

COMPLIMENTARY 

MAP OF 
LOS ANGELES 



* ■. 






t • 






Los Angeles and 

San Diego 
Standard Guide 



tftis 



• • i 



■ 
■ . 

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■ 



eres &<. 



FREE 



Qopy Jo r 




This is the most complete map of Los Angeles ever published. It is right up 
to date in every particular and will be found a reliable guide. With it is 
printed a map of theLos Angeles district showing complete automobile roads. 
Clip out the coupon and call for your copy of this splendid map right now. 

V LOS ANGELES TRUST 
r<AMD SAVINGS BANK 

& SPRING STS. 

LOS ANGELES. CALIFORNIA 




LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



Dies'* ' 



n o<> Returning the following year a 
pLssful search was made for the cross 
a*** mission was founded a second 

November 1, 1776, the seventh 
order of establishment. The 



a 



nd the 
on 



time 
mission 



minion in olclUL UJ - «»m*"** o *"~~" w - — 
ot avis about six miles from the pres- 

SJ " mission, in the Mission Vieja Canyon, 



Father 



is 
Serra's 



"L7 "may"' still be seen the ruins of a 
£5 adobe building. The oldest build- 
o° of the present establishment is the 
1JL one known as 
Ihurcb forming the east side of the quad- 
Lde It was built during his lifetime, 
Ld used up to the completion of the 
w church in 1806, also after the de- 
struction of the great church, until 1800, 
w hen the former living rooms of the two 
fathers in charge were made over into 
the present chapel. The patio or quad- 
ran o-le was the out-door work shop of the 

Indians, where many of their trades were 

carried on. Hats, candles, shoes, blankets 

and other articles were made in moms 
local 1 in the northwest corner. In the 
northeast corner and along the north side 
of the patio were the store houses. ^ The 
kitchen of the padres was in the building 
along the south, and just to the east of 
the kitchen was the pantry, or dispensa, 
wherein may be seen today the ancient 
tule and rawhide ceiling, the old gallery 
and original hand-hewn shelves. 

The walls of the great church are from 
two to seven feet in thickness. They are 
built of boulders, adobe and brick. Lin- 
tels, keystones, capitals and cornices are 
made of sandstone carved by the Indian 
neophytes, and carried by them from the 
quarry six miles away. The ^ roof and 
paving tiles were burned in kilns whose 



remains may be seen on the hillside north 
of the mission. Logs for beams and 
rafters were brought, some from the can- 
yon of the Trabuco (a near-by stream) 
and others from a mountainside twenty 
miles away. The church was nine years 
in building. It had a great terraced 
tower in front, so lofty that it was visi- 
ble ten miles away, and the roof was 
formed of seven domes, one over the 
chancel, three over the transept and three 
covering the nave. It was occupied only 
six years, and destroyed in 1812 by an 
earthquake which occurred during mass. 
Forty people perished in the ruins. The 
great tower fell outward across the Plaza. 
The domes of the nave fell. Those of tin 
transept were afterward blown up by 
gunpowder to make way for a wooden 
roof over the whole, but a heavy rain 
destroyed some of the recently rebuilt 
walls and the work was abandoned. Now, 
nave and transept are open to the sky; 
the altar is covered by the one remaining 
dome. Nine niches are back of the altar; 
the statues which once occupied them are 
in the present chapel. The blue-green 
color, ornamenting the dome and arches 
groin and keystone, is still unfaded, but 
grasses and weeds have sprung up be 
tween the square burnt tiles of the pave 
ment, and the carved cornices and mould- 
of the arches have received an un- 
designed ornamentation ill the 



mg 



regular 



, lw ,,^ ornamentation 

rows of mud swallows' nests which bor- 
der them. The swallows are darting about 
and linnets are filling the air with song. 
Stepping through the doorway (the walls 
of which are six feet thick) and looking 
to the southeast the range of color would 







^ 



/, 



; ■ 




FIRST PEPPER TREE PLANTED IN 



C VLIFORNIA AND 
NEAR OCEANSIDE 



RUINS OF SAN LUIS REV MISSION, 






«* 









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an 



Di 



lego 





ervice 




Home of the Southern Trust and Savings Bank 



ALL KINDS OF BANKING UNDER ONE ROOT 

D EPA R TMENTS: 

COMMERCIA L — TRUST — S A V I N G S 



Y<>u arc invited to take advant 
of the modern, courteous, and effi- 
cient service rendered by this Hank 

make this Bank your headquar- 
ters, while in San Di 'o. 

Correspondence, concerning S 
Diego and its opportunity for invest- 
ment, will be gladly answered, and 

will receive our unprejudiced con- 
sideration. 

Capita/, $350,000,00 
Resources, $2 f 8oo,ooo.oo 

Southern Trust 
and Savings Bank 

r. S. GRANT HOTEL BUILDIN< 
SAN DIKCO, CALIFORNIA 



G. A. DAVIDSON, President 



PHILIP MORSE. Vice-Pres. 



V.. O. HODGE, Cashier 



THE HOTEL WITH 



A 



PERSONALITY 



(( 



A Particular House for Particular People" 



HOTEL 



SANDFORD 



Opened February twenty-eighth, 

Nineteen fourteen. 

Lndcr the personal management 

anc direction of 

Mr. F. S. Sandford 

formerly manager of the Majestic 
Hotel, New York City; also the 
world famous Grand Hotel of 
Yokohama, Japan. 

Absolutely the latest achievement 
in San Diego's Flotel construction. 

Rates Si. 00 Upwards 
Ijo Outside Rooms. 138 Baths 



Fifth and A Sts., San Diego, California 









A Beautiful House in a Beautiful Cii 



A HOUSE OF REFINEMENT AND PERFECT 



SERVICE 



F. S. SANDFORD, Managing Director 



LOS ANG I.KSSAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 








BEAI II VI M( FAN -I 



delight -•"! artisl 's soul. Distant purple 

hills with velvet Bhadows are outline 1 

linst the flawless blue of a California 

;,. Green trees are waving in the mid- 

le distance and ton round, with paler 

ween or yellowing grain fields between. 

Tawny grasses cover the old Plaza del 

1'ueblo before the church and over a 

white door v a i*d fence nearby blaze two 

bushes ot crimson roses. Violet, blue. 

greei yellow and red — the palette was 

t with colors from the rainbow. 

Between the ureal church and the pres- 
ent chapel a pierced wall holds the bells 
which oner swung high in the tall tower. 

There are four, all bearing interesting 
inscriptions, two dated 1796 and two lsoj. 
As the mission is older than the earliest 
of tl dates, evidently th< se are not 
the original bells, which were either not 

Mind after being buried, or were recast 

when these bells were made. An inter- 
sting and artistic booklet prepared bj 

the priest in charge, Father St. John 
O'Sullivan, relates some old traditions of 
the bells of Capistrano and gii - much 

valuable information about the establish- 
ment. It can be purchased at the mis- 
sion, and, with it in hand, the patio and 

corridors are filled with the life of other 

%s. The arches along the east wail are 
intact and the pavement of large square 
,l ' e is unbroken, though worn by many 

^eet in years gone by. Across the south 
s jde the arches extend three-quarters of 

tlle way and about two-thirds of the way 










K>S8 the north side. Standing near the 
north end of the eastern corridor, tin 

picture seen across the patio is unfor- 



table. On the south side the ti 1 
; lit'i 1 in the center a half ory high ■ 
than the 1 31 and is topped by the pic- 
turesque chimney i the ancient kite! 
The coloring 1 tl tiles is marvelous, 
runnii through dull 1 da and purpl 
tints into exquisite mossy screens. < ol, 
alluring shadows lurk in the depth- < 
the cloistered walk, the brov ish-whit 
pillars and arches are wreath I and hung 
with ivy, and one splendid crimson climb- 
ing rose lights up the low toi - of tin 
background . Fortunate Calii rnia to 1 
dowered with such an inheritanc A 

place so satisfying: t«> the eye and to tl 
imagination, one is loth to leave. Thr- 
o'clock and the next train foi San Dies: 
con .ill too soon. K< _ ullv. om sees 
the missi n walls pass out of sight, bu 
immediately there is a new interest. Tli 
train passes betw< q hills to th « n 
-nore and in a verv f< w minute- u 1- 

skirting the beach, the surf mllii ] tar 
up the sands at the right : high cl - 
rising on the left. Looking back up th 
beach as we turn to the shore from be- 
tween the hills we catch a glin s< th 
high cliff described by Dana in his "Tw 
Fears Before the Mast," over which hi< - 
were thrown onto the narrow beach be- 
low and from thei taken in small boats 

to the ships. Once it was cal 1 El Eni- 
barcadero Vieja, but it is now known as 
Dana's Point. For miles the track hugs 
the shore. When it take- a com- fui 

ther back, deep gullies and draw- lead 

down F> the ocean and gh e _ imj 
of the dancing waves or rolling surf. 

When the track rises high enough for a 






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I. OS ANGE1.KS-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



'5 

water. 



. w ove r the cliffs we see wide fields and 
rolling hills, glorified everywhere by the 
golden mustard lying like patches of sun- 
shine over the fields and making a new 
Thaddeus Welch picture of every hillside. 
Oceanside is reached in less than an hour. 
Here is a comfortable hotel, a beautiful 
beach and a prosperous little town, which 
is the base for the four-mile drive to San 
Luis Rey, that flower of all the missions 
for site and architecture. If the stop 
is made now one must stay overnight. 
If this is inconvenient the stop-over can 
be made on the return trip from San 
Diee'o unless one wishes to come back by 

A livery barn across the road 
from the station will furnish at a moder- 
ate price a horse and buggy or carriage 
for I he drive. The road runs straight 
from Oceanside until the Home of the 
Rosicrucians is reached, a pretty building 
surrounded by flowers. Soon there is a 
turn and we are looking up the valley of 
the San Luis Rey river, beautiful with 
its level plain and encircling hills, as 
are all these mission valleys. Away in 
the distance Ave see the shining tower 
and the white, restored Avails of the church 
and monastery. A few more turns lead 
us down into the valley and then a long, 
straight road until just before the church 
is reached when Ave climb the eminence 
on which it stands. The site is a noble 
one, commanding as it does a vieAv of 
the -whole length of the valley, but the 
church is disappointing in its freshness 
of renewed plaster, white and buff kal- 
somine and paint. One longs for the 
mellow, time-stained Avails with the bricks 
showing under the fallen plaster; but the 
lines of the church, the doorways, the 
mouldings, the pilasters still impress one 
with their beauty. 

San Luis Rey de Francia was the eigh- 
teenth mission in order of time. It was 
founded by Father Lasuen in October. 
1797, but the church Avas not begun until 
June, 1798. Father Antonio Peyri, one 
of the best loved of the early Franciscan 
priests, superintended the building, which 
was completed in 1802. It was a noble 
edifice "one hundred and sixty feet long, 
Rfty wide and sixty feet high, with walls 
four feet thick. A tower at one side held 
a belfry, for eight bells. The corridor 
on the opposite side had two hundred and 
fi%-six arches. Its gold and silver or- 
naments are said to have been superb." 
The valley below was exceedingly fertile 



and the flocks and herds doubled every 
ten years. In 1826 Father Peyri received 
into the church 2,869 Indians. In 1834, 
about the time of secularization, the In- 
dian population around San Luis Rey Avas 
35,000. The mission possessed over 24,000 

head of cattle, 10,000 horses and 100,000 
sheep. 

In the patio of San Luis Rey Father 
Peyri planted Avith his own hands the 
first pepper tree of California. He was 
the first to establish a hospital and to 
teach the Indians the rudiments of 
hygiene. After secularization the church 
was spared the vandalism which hastened 
the destruction of so many of the mis- 
sion buildings, although it was used as a 
military post during the Mexican war. 
After many years of neglect, it was de- 
termined in 1892 to repair it and restore 
it to the Franciscan order. In 1893 the 
church was re-dedicated and there were 
present at the services three ancient In- 
dian Avomen who had heard the original 
dedication services ninety years before. 
Once more the mission bells ring across 
the valley, once more the voice of priest 
and chorister is heard within the old 
Avails, and once more the brown robed 
Franciscans Avith bare, or sandalled feet 
tread the worn tiles of corridor and nave. 
A long new structure with arches pat- 
terned after the original building stretches 
out in line with the fachada of the church. 
This is the home of the brothers. It is a 
reminder of their voav of poverty to see 
on the doorstep a small basket covered 
with a clean cloth, the contribution toward 
their daily food, of some pious parish- 
ioner in the valley below. The new build- 
ing is all a glaring white, but time will 
tone it in with the landscape. The origi- 
nal pavement of large square tiles is be- 
fore the church, the worn or broken 
places repaired with cement. The church 
has been re-roofed with the original curved 
tile made by the Indians. The large, im- 
posing building is covered with a butt 
wash outside and decorated with brown 
trimmings, a probable innovation contem- 
porary with its restoration. The wails 
and ceilings within are gaudily ^ colored 
following the patterns of the original In- 
dian decorations. The old, faded shades, 
visible in one of the arches, are much 
more satisfactory. A perfectly propor- 
tioned dome covers the chancel, with 
beautiful groined arches on each side. lie 
altar and ornaments are as m the old 















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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 






LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 









> 












days, except that one statue is missing 
from its niche. A life-size statue of St. 
Francis is very good. An old Byzantine 
wooden pulpit made by the Indians is 
reached by a narrow stairway from the 
chancel. Father Salvidea, who figures in 
Bamona, is buried in the chancel. Two 
later Mexican priests are buried in the holy 
ground outside. The half-ruined mortuary 
chapel is perhaps the most interesting part 
of the church. Unrestored, with its pas- 
sages and stairway in the thickness of the 
walls, it has come straight down to us out 
of the past. 

The restored mission is now educating 
priests instead of Indians, but it is also 
ministering to the people of the valley 
which it overlooks. Most of them are 
Mexicans, but here and there are descend- 
ants of those for whose conversion the 
mission was founded. 

Every fall the father in charge presides 
over a fiesta which is held by the people 
of the valley, and to which the Mexicans 
flock from far and near. They make 
merry with music and dancing and their 
characteristic sports, and bring rugs and 
lace and pottery to sell. Heaps of tules 
here and there in the fields show where 
their ramadas, or arbors, have stood. 

A ride of eighteen or twenty miles from 
San Luis Rey will bring one to San 
Antonio de Pala. This was an asistencia, 
or branch of San Luis Rey, founded by 
Father Peyri for the convenience of the 
mountain Indians who found the distance 













--■ 







to the large church too great. The pic- 
turesque bell tower of Pala is a favorite 
subject for the artist. The bells still call 
the Indians to worship, but these are not 
the original Pala Indians, nor their de- 
scendants. They were scattered, after 
secularization. These are the Indians 
brought from Warner's ranch after their 
ejectment, and, through the efforts of the 
Sequoya League, settled here. 

From Ocean side the train passes through 
several pretty seaside towns. Del Mar is 
a particularly pretty place, with a beauti- 
ful hotel facing t lie ocean. It has a wide, 
firm beach with fine bathing facilities, a 
pleasure pier, and affords all sorts of 
out-of-door sports, hunting, deep sea and 
surf fishing, tennis, croquet and golf, 1). \. 
ing, riding and driving. Resides the hole] 
there are many attractive homos. 

Three-quarters of an hour more and the 
train nears San Diego, first False Ray, 
the scene of the opening act of the Mis- 
sion Play at San Gabriel. A long arm 
stretches from the north down on the 
west side precisely as Point Loma em- 
braces the northwestern end of the 1 il 
San Diego bay just below. The train 
skirts Pacific Beach, which faces False 
Bay and Point Loma comes into view, 
cutting off the real bay from our vision. 
We see a lighthouse at the end and fane 
that the most strongly marked buildings 
are those of Madam Tingley's Theosopiii- 
cal Home. A little further and the beau- 
tiful Harbor of the Sun is at our feet, 



. 



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■ 



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■ 




LA IOI.I.A BEACH 



and we have reached San Diego, whose 
beginning was the firs! mission planted 

by the Franciscans in Alta California in 
1769. Blessed by the good Father Serra, 

watered by the blood of martyrs, ex- 
panded in later years by far-seeing men, 
it now embraces the beautiful bay which 
is its harbor and is the first American 
port to be reached by ships coming through 
the canal, whose completion she is now 
making ready to celebrate. San Diego is 

a place of first things. Walter Colton in 
his diary says: 
California were corralled, the first sheep 
sheared, the first field furrowed, the first 
vineyard planted, the first church bell 
™ng," and John S. McGroarty in his 

California. ' ' adds- ii Hpvp wpvp rpnred 



"Here the first cattle in 



CURTIS SCHOOL OF AVIATION, NORTH ISLAND 



ornia 7 adds : i i Here were rea r 
the first cross, the first church, the first 
town. Here, too, was the first cultivated 
field, the first palm, and the first vine and 
olive to blossom into fruitage from the 

Me-giving waters of the first irrigating 

ditch. ' > 

San Diego began at Oldtown, in the 
northern part of the present city. Here 
we cross was planted by Father Serra in 



1769 



i 



and here on the hill above the 



Presidio was built. A little later the site 
of the church A\as changed to the spot 

six miles ii]) the San Diego river, where 
the ruins of the mission now stand over- 
looking the valley. The little Spanish 
settlement down near the shores of False 
Bay grew slowly. In 1867 Alonzo Horton 
came to San Diego with his savings earned 
in a little furniture shop in San Francisco. 
It was onlv a few hundred dollar- that 
he had, but he foresaw future for the 
harbor and a city upon its shores. He 
invested his all in land at twentv-six 
cents an acre, and became owner of nearly 
all the territory on which modern San 
Diego is built. He sold some of his land 
and divided other acres into lots, which 
brought him $100 a piece. He lived to see 
his foresight justified, and he is often 
called the Father o\' San Diego. Some of 
his $100 lots are now worth half a mil- 
lion, but between those days and this San 

Diego has met with vicissitudes, all of 
which she has triumphed over. A later 
foster father is John D. Spreckels, who 

has invested millions here. Now, with 
the San Diego and Arizona railway as- 
sured, giving direct eastern conn, tion 






r 









































LOS ANfiKLKS-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



VARIETY OF SHIPPING IN "THE HARBOR OF THE SUN"— SAN DIEGO 



\\\ 



itb 



Souiliern 



Diego 



CO 

der 



H ie souiliern radius Railway at 

v ]0ia and shortening the (lis! mice be- 
; een ' all eastern points and San 
ar ly one hundred miles, her only handi- 
„ lack of sufficient transportation facil- 
ities by rail, is removed. The line will 
U completed long before the exposition 
ear rolls around. 

' San Diego has a prolific back country, 
u oo'eil but, when blessed with water, won- 
1 fully fertile, and she needs the best 
f water and rail transportation to mar- 
ket the products. The city is connected 
through Los Angeles with the east and 
north by the Santa Fe Railroad system. 
There are eight daily trains to Los An- 
oeles and two to San Francisco. The San 
Diego Southern Railway is a steam route 
to Sweetwater Dam and Tia Juana, with 
a station at the foot of Sixth Street. The 
San Diego, Cuyamaca and Eastern Rail- 
way Company operates both steam and 
gasoline motor trains through El Cajon 
Valle Station at the foot of Tenth 
Street. La Jolla Railway Company ope- 
Jes gasoline motor cars from the ticket 
office at Fourth and C streets for Pacific 
Beach and La Jolla. The Pacific Naviga- 
tion Company, the Pacific Coast Steam- 
Company, and the North Pacific 



vr 

lt< 



of towering height, which fact, in conjunc- 
tion with the width of the streets, lends 
to the city an open, airy, cheerful aspect, 
unusual in cities of similar size. The 
shops are excellent, modern in appoint- 
ments and with stocks of the best. Some 
of the jewelry stores make a specialty of 
native gems mined in San Diego County, 
tourmaline, hyacinth, beryl, kunzite and 
others. One of the famous hotels of 
Southern California, the U. S. Grant, cost- 
ing $2,000,000, splendid in building and 
appointments, is in the heart of the city, 
and a short distance down the street is 
the handsome Hotel San Diego. Besides 
these there are at least thirty other hotels 

* 

and new ones are being added, looking 
forward not only to the exposition, but to 
San Diego's advantages as a convention 



ship ... 

Steamship Company make San Diego their 

southern terminus. The Ensenada Trans- 
portation Company operates a steamer for 
freight and passengers between San Diego 
and Ensenada, Mexico, and the "Manuel 
Herrerias" of the Compania Naviera del 
Paeifico plies between San Diego and 
Maz Ian, stopping at several Mexican 
ports between. As transportation facili- 
ties increased the city grew. In 1900 the 
population was 17,000; in 1905, 22,500. 

By the Federal census of 1900 it was 
39,700, and it is now estimated at 90,000. 
The city contains seventy miles of street 
railways and thirty-three miles of paved 
streets, with fifty miles of automobile 
boulevards. It maintains four daily papers, 
lias a public library of 55,000 volumes 
bused in a pretty Carnegie Library build- 
ing 1 , and twenty-four public schools, in- 
cluding an especially handsome new high 
school in Norman style carried out in 
gray stone, and a very tine State Normal 
School, with buildings costing $315,000. It 
has many and handsome churches of all 
denominations, one with a beautiful chime 
of bells. Business buildings are notice- 



city. Only a half hour away, by ferry 
or automobile is the delightful Coronado 



Hotel, combining all the pleasures of a 
coast resort with inland out-of-door sports 

advantages. Military 

of the United 



and 



and 



metropolitan 
naval 



States 



departments 
Government add 



interest to the 
a United States 



town. Fort Rosecrans, 
fort, guards the entrance to the harbor. 
A torpedo boat and submarine station, 
and the most powerful naval wireless tele- 
station on the Pacific Coast, are 

On North 



raph 
maintained 






Diego. 



year. 

« 

partments 

ment here, 



ably of substantial excellence. None is of palms 



on 
at San 

Island are army aviation training grounds, 
which have the advantage over eastern 
grounds of being available all through the 

Besides these there are other de- 
of the United States Govern- 
quarantine, coaling, customs 
and immigration stations, and branches^ of 
the internal revenue and forestry service. 
The Spreckels Theater, the finest thea- 
ter on the Pacific Coast, is of reinforced 
concrete, fireproof construction and splen- 
didly equipped in every way. The build- 
occupies an entire block and has a 
seating capacity of over two thousand. 
Other theaters are the Isis, owned by the 
Theosophical Society; the Savoy, the Mir- 
ror the Empress (vaudeville), the Grand 
(stock company), and a score of moving 
picture houses. 

In park lands, San Diego is especially 
rich, much of them, unimproved as yet, 

but keeping pace 
in improvement, 
business district, just 
Grant Hotel, is the pretty little ^Plaza, full 

and other 



mg 



with 

In the 

before 



the city's 
center 
the 



growth 
of the 

U. S. 



trees, with a foun- 









n 



kill 



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• : n the center sending cooling streams 

111 111 i-** w w . • • • 

I the air by day and glowing in rain- 
colors with wonderful electric effects 
If^ht At the end of the Pavilion ear 
1 * P is Mission Cliff Park, beautifully enl- 
isted brilliant with flowers, and with 

njtional attractions of shady walks. 
Lfortahle seats, a fountain playing over 

pool of water lilies, a refreshment house, 
u beyond all else affording along its 

thern border one of the most rarely 
lautiful views of which any city can 

■let Hiffh from the valley bed of the 

I'd'- l • • i • nn i 1 ■ l 

U Diego river rise the cliffs, along winch 
L park lies. On the opposite side of 



and, with water and the climate of San 
Diego, capable of producing wonderful 

results in luxuriant growth of trees and 
flowers. Here are being brought to reality 
the plans for the exposition of 1015. Most 
of the exposition work in the park will 
be permanent and will add greatly to its 
beaut v. A handsome, arched bridge -pan 

Canyon, with an ornamental 

lending to it. Across Spanish 
a dam is built, which will form 

a beautiful lagoon with 



Cabrillo 



planade 
Canyon 

of the 



e 



canyon 

many branches. Flowers, shrubs and trees 
arc being propagated in enormous quanti- 
ties for the adornment of the grounds, and 




RESIDENCE OF loilN 1>. SPRECKELS AT SAX DIEGO 







wide floor of the valley rise other 

|liffs and hills, both lines probably mark- 
! what were the banks of a once giant 
ver, now diminished to a small stream 
owing down to the sea through the fields 
elow. From hillside to hillside the plain 

patches, level as a floor, checkered in 

liferent colors by green alfalfa and 

den ffrain. "Down flip, si renin is the 



all 



designed 



LAS VEGAS GRADE 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS ROAD, SAN DIEGO COUNTV 



level as a floor, 
colors by green 

grain. Down the stream is 

pan. into which the sun sinks in splen- 

p", flooding the valley with .golden light, 

P the stream on a hill stand the ruins 
v- the mission, looking down the whole 
fogtb of the valley to the sea. 

Balboa Park is a rich dower for any 
[ty> of whatever magnitude — 1,460 acres 
the heart of the town, high ground 
r °in which the views over the harbor are 
ll Perb, cu t \yy picturesque canyons and 
I'Hies of whose landscape possibilities ad- 
Mage is taken in developing the park, 



already plantations of thousands of rare 
trees have been made. The buildings are 

on Spanish- American lines, 
with suggestions of the missions, and are 
peculiarly adapted to their environment. 

The harbor of San Diego ranks as third 
in importance on the Pacific ('oast. It 
has the requisite depth and area, a chan- 
nel through which vessels of the deepest 



draught can sail "with ease, and 



thor- 



is 

oughly protected from all ocean storms. 
Point Lorn a reaches down a long curv- 
ing arm from the north, sheltering the 
bay on the north and northwest, whil 
from the southern shore the Silver Strand, 
a narrow, sandy strip, reaches up until it 
expands into Coronado and North Island, 
effectually protecting the bay on the west. 
The bay has a total area of twenty-two 
square miles. When improvements which 
are begun have been completed, San Diego 






ii 



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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 






1 I- 
















STATE NORMAL, POLYTECHNIC, HIGH AND FLORENCE HEIGHTS SCHOOLS. SAN DIEGO 















\ 



ins: 



II ] iaV e 22,000 feet of sea wall and 
wen miles of clocks, which will be ade- 
te for a city of a million population. 
t a addition, the sea wall will reclaim 
■ er fourteen hundred acres of land suit- 
lie f°r warehouses and factories. But 
I'l is not only for naval and commercial 
■ourposes that the hay of San Diego is so 
, a luable. For yachting and motor boat- 
it is unrivaled at all seasons of the 
vear. There are three yacht clubs in and 
e ar San Diego with many members, and 
motor boating is becoming more and more 
popular. Those interested in both sports 
Le coming from less favorable climate* 
t0 the place where they can enjoy their 
fill the year around. 

It is San Diego's situation and climate 
that are her greatest assets, both God- 
oiven, her fortunate dowry. The city has 
expanded until it stretches from the north- 
ern to the southern extremity of the bay, 
rising gradually from the water level to 
the high land of Balboa Park. The beau- 
tiful bay is always in the foreground, the 
vision widening with every foot of rise, 
until the distant mountains and misty 
islands in the ocean are included in the 

scene. 
The climate of San Diego is remarkable 

for its evenness, there being no extreme 

cold and few hot days. Nights are always 

cool. There is very little fog. There is 

sunshine 356 days out of the 3G5. Rainfall 

averages only ten inches. All out-of-door 

sports* can be enjoyed almost every day in 

the year. 

Situation and climate add to the at- 
tractiveness of the homes of San Diego. 
Of pleasing architectural design, and some 
of them very beautiful, they stand un- 
crowded and surrounded by almost tropical 
verdure. Palms, magnolias and India rub- 
ber trees are in almost every dooryard, 
fuchsias, heliotrope and geraniums climb 
over the windows, orange and lemon trees 
perfume the air, and roses of every color 
abound. 

No place of the size of San Diego is the 
base for so many interesting and such 
diversified trips, by automobile, by boat, by 
steam car and electric, and gasoline motor. 
A "Seeing San Diego' ' trip by automobile 
affords an excellent general view of the 
city, of its business streets, public build- 
ings, churches, schools and beautiful homes, 
of Balboa Park and the Exposition site, 
°f Golden Hill Park, the already improved 
Part of Balboa with a stop at Lookout 
Point where there is a splendid outlook 



over the bay, Coronado, Point Loma to the 
mountains of Mexico and the islands of 
the sea. The different lines of the street 
railway system also enable one to see the 
city and its various points of interest by 
trolley. 

The Point Loma trip by sight-seeing 
automobile gives an afternoon of pleasure 
and is one of the most picturesque rides of 
Southern California. Every foot of the 
delightfully smooth road offers something 
of interest. First Loma Portal a beautiful 
new residence section of San Diego at the 
base of the point, and near by the spacious 
eiuhteen-hole golf links and handsome club 
house. A little further and the automobile 
passes under the high Roman arch which 
forms the entrance to the grounds of the 
International Theosophical headquarters. 
These headquarters were established here by 
Madame Katherine Tingley in 1900. Since 
that time she has made the wilderness to 
blossom as the rose. Sand and sage-brush 
have given way to lawns and flowers. The 
views are superb from almost every point 
in the grounds. They embrace the blue 
bay, the sparkling Pacific, the distant 
mountains, the faint, ethereal islands on 
the horizon, as well as the charm of color, 
luxuriant vegetation and handsome build- 
ings in the foreground. The Raja Yoga 
College and Aryan Memorial Temple are 
striking edifices with the domes and arches 
of the architecture of India. In another 
part of the grounds a Greek temple out- 
lined against the blue ocean makes an 
exquisite picture. Facing the temple is a 
Greek amphitheater built in a natural 
hollow. There are many other buildings 
connected with the establishment. There 
are about 200 pupils in the Raja Yoga 
College, and a good many small children 
are cared for and educated. The Lonia- 
land Forestry Department of the college 
has received high praise from the United 
States Forestry Department. Connected 
with it is an extensive nursery from which 
over 25,000 trees grown from seed have 
been planted during the past six years. 
There is also a weather station and bureau 
equipped with fine instruments, from which 
daily reports are sent to the United States 
Weather Bureau at Washington. An im- 
portant department of the Theosophical 
headquarters is the Aryan Theosophical 
Press, where the literature of the society 
is published and whence it is distributed 
throughout the world. The publications 
include four monthly periodicals. 



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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



















the trip. A conductor 



,. 



SUNSET, POINT LOMA 



CAVE, OCEAN BEACH 



After visiting this world-famous insti- 
tution the automobile continues southward 
along Point Loma Boulevard through the 
government reservation. The road over- 
looks Fort Rosecrans on the bay side of the 
point and the big guns which form the de- 
fense of the harbor are easily seen. The 
breakwater and entrance to the harbor are 
just under our feet and farther away Coro- 
nado beach and hotel are visible. A stop 
is made at the Bennington monument, a 
tall shaft commemorating the men who 
perished in the explosion on the Bennino-- 
ton a few years ago. At the extreme end 
ot the point is the so-called Spanish light- 
house, a quaint old building looking the 
part of its reputation, but really built*after 
Spanish dominion had passed away from the 
land At the very end of the point, over 
the hill on the ocean side is the modern 
Government lighthouse, throwing its pierc- 
ing, intermittent beam many miles out to 
sea. The lighthouse is ninety feet high 



I! 



standing on a thirty-foot base. It is a 
sheer fall of 200 feet from the end of the 
point down to the water. Coronado islands 
can be seen twenty miles away in the 
offing. Paralleling the end of the point is 
the breakwater two miles long which, with 
Point Loma, forms the channel leading int.) 
San Diego Bay from the ocean. A whist- 
ling buoy marks the end of the channel. 
Far away is the Silver Strand which con- 
nects Coronado with the mainland at the 
south. When a road, which is planned, is 
bmlt from Coronado to North Island across 
Spanish Bight which nearly separates them, 

the beach and drive will* be fifteen miles 
long. 

Of course everyone who goes to San 
Diego must make the trip to Tia Juana and 
step over the boundary line into old 
Mexico. Sight-seeing cars leave at 9:00 
a. m. and 2:00 p. m., but not always daily, 
so it is best to consult someone connected 
with the sight-seeing automobiles in plan- 






incr trie trip. x *- cvmiviliv i wl is usually 

Ed near ihe u - s - Grant Hote1 ' or in ~ 

{ lX y can be made at the information 
bureau in the hotel or at Dodge's Informa- 
tion Bureau in the Savoy Building on 
Third and C streets. 

rphe route leads through the southern 
pa rt of San Diego, between orange, lemon 
and olive groves, through the towns of 
fjational City and Chula Vista, along 
Palm Avenue through Nestor to the custom 
house standing on the borders of old Mexico. 
Ihe" road is lined nearly all the way by 
eucalyptus, palms, Monterey cypresses and 
pepper trees. After crossing the boundary 
it is but a short drive to Tia Juana, a 
small Mexican town, half quaint and 
foreign, half ugly and commercial. A 
queer little play-fort is at the entrance of 
the town and soldiers in soiled white uni- 
form are busy making adobe bricks and 
layii them out to dry, or repairing what 



Irving Cobb calls the " knee-works ' ' of the 
fort. In the center of the adobe enclosure 
is a small wooden house with little pill-box 
turrets at two corners. The road turns at 
Ihe corner into the main street which con- 
sists of a dozen stores (mostly curio stores) 
and restaurants. Tia Juana means Aunt 
Jane. One wonders why the name was 
bestowed. Everyone flocks to the curio 
stores and buys drawn work, carved 
leather or pottery, not more than a dol- 
lar's worth, for that is all that can be 
taken in duty free. It requires consider- 
able skill to consume an hour in spending 

one dollar, and any spare time is passed 
in buying postal cards, addressing and 
mailing them on foreign soil, or in 
lunching on real Mexican tamales and 
enchiladas. On the way back everything 
must be declared at the custom house and 
packages are examined. From Palm Ave- 
nue the automobile turns to the Silver 



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ONE TON OF FISH— ON 



E DAY'S SPORT AT CORONADO BEACH 



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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 




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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



. j, stands on a small hill and some one 
•11 show you Hie articles. If you do not 

P to do this nothing is obtruded upon 
ear rp| ie trip to Tia Juana is often made 
f^Vav of Sweetwater Dam, on the San 
nLo ' Southern Railroad, and some con- 

w this the most interesting way to go. 

Old Town is the center of the historic 
inter est of San Diego, or, perhaps divides 
nt honor with the old mission. It is 
Lewliat confusing to the stranger to 

L r of mission relics at both spots and 

? learn how far apart they are. Old 

Town was the place where the padres 
u a lted on their northward march from 

Lower California, set up their cross and 

dedicated their mission. On the hill above, 
the Presidio was built and the soldiers 

established there. A little later Father 
Serin deemed it wise to remove the mis- 
sion farther from the Presidio (a policy 
i which he carried out at later missions 
also) and he chose the site six miles up 
the valley of the San Die.u'o river, where 



the ruins of the mission buildings now 
stand. At Old Town the ruins of the 
Presidio may be seen, the old palms which 
were the first planted in California, the 
old graveyard, the first brick house in 
California, the monument which marks tin 
spot where General Fremont raised the 
American flag in 1846, old Fort Stockton, 
mission relics and an old mission bell in 

was built for a 
1854 and later, 
saloon and bil- 
liard hall, became a church; the fine old 
adobe tile-roofed home of the Estudillo 
family, which is known as Raraona's Mar- 
riage Plaee, and across the road from that 
the old home of Don Juan Bandini, fa- 
miliar to readers of Dana's "Two Years 
Refore the Mast" and Alfred Robinson's 
"Life in California/' The Bandini home 

changed by the addition 

* The Estudillo 



the present church, which 
home by George Lyon in 
after degenerating into a 



of a 

house 



is sadly 

frame second story. 

needs no connection with Ramona's name 

to add to its interest. In its restored 




SCENES AT WARNER'S SPRINGS 






Strand leading to Coronado and for eight 
miles the drive is along this narrow cause- 
way, in some places not over one hundred 
feet wide with the surf of the ocean 
washing it on one side and the bav on the 
other. The road passes through the tent 
city of Coronado, through the grounds of 
the beautiful Coronado Hotel, and gives 
a glimpse of the pretty town on the way 
to the ferry boat which plies between San 
Diego and Coronado. This trip consumes 
a half day; but there is a longer "Special" 
trip which includes Imperial Beach, gives 

two hours in Mexico and a half hour at 
Coronado, taking a day in all. Particu- 
lars about this trip can be had at Dodge's 
Information Bureau, Third and C streets. 
Neither one of these trips gives enough 
time to enjoy Coronado to the full, but it 
is a simple matter to make a supple- 
mentary independent trip by electric car 
and ferry to Coronado. The court of the 
hotel, not visible from the outside, is one 
of its most charming features, all bright 



as it is with flowers and sunshine, and 
shaded with trees and vines, with birds 
singing and the sound of the surf wash- 
ing the beach on which the hotel stands. 
Coronado offers all sorts of temptations to 
those who love out-door life. Polo, golf, 
tennis, fishing, bathing, walking, riding 
and driving, each has its devotees. 

The unique Japanese tea-garden of 
George T. Marsh should not be overlooked. 
Following the path indicated by sign pests 
a gate is found in the Japanese wall which 
surrounds the place. On sounding a gong at 
the gate a pretty little Japanese maiden 
appears and leads you into the garden, 
after you have paid the small entrance 
fee which includes tea and wafers. You 
may wander at will in the garden and 
when you are tired and rest yourself in one 
of the pretty tea houses, the little maiden 
will lay down her embroidery and bring 
tea. Afterwards, if you wish to look at 
beautiful Japanese goods which are for 
sale you may go up to the Japanese house 








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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



state it presents a charming' picture of 
one of the better class of homes during 
the days of the Spanish regime. Every 
foot of it is full of interest. George 
Wharton James speaks of the place where 
"the fictitious marriage of the fictitious 
Kamona to the fictitious hero took place," 
and the chapel of this home may well 
have been the place Mrs. Jackson had in 
mind when she wrote her romance, but 
the marriage is no historic fact. The house 
is built around three sides of a patio, 
which contains a fountain and "wishing 
well," flowers and vines wreathing the 
verandas and hanging in festoons from 
the roof. The patio opens on the fourth 
side into a beautiful garden. The house 
is of adobe, with tiled roof and the veran- 
da floors around the three sides of the 
patio have been re-paved with square 
burned tiles brought from an old aqueduct 
built by the padres in 1770 which brought 
water from a dam across the San Diego 
river. The house was built in 1825. The 
kitchen at the farthest end of one side of 
the patio contains old copper cooking 
utensils 



pottery dishes. 



copper 
brought from Spain, and old 

A tule shelf for milk and 



cheese hangs on the side of the room 
farthest from the fireplace. The floor i s 
iiled and worn into hollows by years of 
use. It is a cool, comfortable room and 
does not compare unfavorably with the 
average kitchen of today. In the patio is 
a stone filter over a hundred years old 
and still in use. Across the conn or 
patio is the dining room. The Indian 
servants were kept on the kitchen side f 
the house; on the opposite side were the 
family living rooms. The doors of the 
house are hand-hewn and the rafters are 
tied with thongs. The house has been con- 
verted into a sort of a museum and con- 
tains many interesting things, among them 
a Mexican Carreta 200 years old, and a 
stage-coach sixty-five years old which used 
to nm to Fort Yuma. Its original cost 
was $1,600. In one room is considerable 
furniture which once belonged to Alonzo 
Horton, the "Father of San Diego." In 
another room is a collect ion of mission 
paintings and there are hourly lectures on 
the missions. Indian blankets, has' els, 
curios, photographs, etc., are for sale in 
one of the rooms. 




RAMONA'S MARRIAGE PLACE 
Reached by San Diego Electric Railway Company 



seven 



It is a beautiful drive from San Diego 
to the Old Mission. The sight-seeing auto- 
mobiles make the trip frequently but not 

daily, so it is best to make previous 

arrangements. The route is generally to 

oo by the valley and return along the high 
ground and through Balboa Park or vice 

versa. The father in charge will show the 

buildings to visitors. There is a modern 
( .j ia |,el which contains many things taken 
f ro m the old church, of which now only 
the i'achada and a few walls remain. The 
tower is gone, bui one bell hangs from a 
beam. This was recast from four small 
bells which were broken when the tower 
fell during an earthquake. The bell is of 
beautiful tone. There were originally 

bells. Two in»w hang before the 
chinch in Old Town and one in a Catholic 
chinch in San Diego. Many fragments of 
adobe walls indicate how large the original 
enc 'sure must have been, about thirty 
acres. Parts of a cactus hedge also re- 
main. The first olive orchard of California 
is here, 140 years old and still bearing. 
Tin -re are several towering* palm trees 
about the same age as the old palms of 
Old Town. It was in 1774 that Padre 
Junipero moved the mission from Old Town 
to this spot. In 1775 there was an up- 

among the Indians and Father 
Jayme was murdered. The mission build- 
were destroyed by fire and other 
means. They were soon rebuilt and dedi- 
cat 1 in 1777, but not entirely completed 
until 1784. In 1804 a new church was 
built which gave place in 1813 to the 
structure whose ruins we view with in- 
terest today. The main building was 
about ninety feet long. The Avails are 
four feet thick. The building was mainly 
of adobe, but the doorway and window 
casino's were made of burnt tile. The 
church stands on an eminence commanding 
a fine view down the beautiful mission 
valley to the sea. Perhaps the most in- 
teresting of all the things to be seen is 
the well in the orchard across the road 
below the mission and the underground 
passage which leads to it from the church. 
The door opening into the well from the 
passage can be seen. The church end is 
closed. The fathers seemed to be in 
more danger in San Diego than elsewhere 



rising 



mgs 




from Indian 



outbreaks and the 

was probably made so that 



passage 

so mac they might 

have access to water if they should be 
besieged in the church buildings. 

Old Town is reached by train or by 

trolley cars marked Ramona's Home. 

After' a half-day in Old Town one can go 
on to La Jolla, a pretty town with bril- 
liant borders of flowers along its walk 
and famous for its wonderful cliffs and 

eaves and wave-worn arches along the 
ocean shore. There is good bathing here 
and the place is both a summer resort and 
the site of many beautiful all-the-year- 
'round homes. There is a good hotel, and 
a fascinating arts and crafts shop, an 
aquarium, and not far away a biological 
station of the University of California. 
La Jolla is also the home of the rare 
Torrey pine. The bungalows down near 
the beach are not numbered but each 
hears its name on a little sign, "The 

Breakers/' "The Cozy," "The Nest/* 
"Honeybug," "The Green Dragon," etc. 
Pacific Beach and Ocean Beach are both 

Both can boast 



There 



pleasant places to visit. 

fine beaches, bordering the Pacific. 

are Bay Excursions which visit Fort Rose- 

erans and other interesting spots by water, 

giving one a fine view of the bay. There 

are also excursions to Coronado Island, a 

delightful trip for those who love the 

ocean. 

What are called "Back Country Trips" 

leave the office of Dodge's Information 
Bureau (Third and C streets) daily for 
Grossmont, El Cajon Valley. La Mesa and 
other interesting places. Grossmont i< 
1,200 feet above the sea and offers a 
magnificent panorama of ocean, mountain 
and valley scenery. To the north snow- 
capped San Antonio is seen and nearer 
at hand San Jacinto and the Palomar 
mountains, to the south the table moun- 
tains of Old Mexico, to the east the timber- 
covered Cuyamaea range and to the west 
the city, the bay, the ocean and the islands 
on the horizon. 



The above bv no 

■ 

interesting excursions 
from San Diego, but 
tions for trips which 
traveler. 



means exhaust the 
which can be taken 
offer a few sugges- 
will well repay the 



IN 1909 THE POPULATION OF SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA, WAS 



30,000 



WAS 90,000, AN 



WORLD 






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U. S. GRANT HOTEL 

San Diego, California 



JAMES II. HOLMES 
General Manager 



fireproof] 





TRIUMPH 



in service and appointments; the social center of San Diego; cen- 
trally located overlooking the famous Plaza Park; convenient to all 
attractions of city, country and the wonderful land-locked bay of 22 square 







miles. 
Mexic 



J 



headquarters will be a delightful outing. Go through the 1400 acre city 
park where the Panama-California Exposition is fast nearing completion 
and is to be opened January 1st, 1915. 





Rates at the U. S. Grant Hotel range from #1.50 per day upward, 

Visit the famous "Bivouac Grill." 

Two large salt water pools each 50 feet in length. 

Duplicate Turkish Baths for men and women. 

Send for our handsome booklet. 








■ ; 



WWW 

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HOME ECONOMY BUILDING 



Panama-California Exposition 

SAN DIEGO, 1915 

Description firefiared by the Department of Exploitation and 'Publicity for the 



Los Angeles - dan Di 



ego 



Standard Guide 



of 

as 
be 

to 



Colonel David Charles Collier, president 
of the San Diego 1915 Exposition, easts 
his shadow large over that project, but it 
is a benificent shadow, and it is safe to 
sa that the present advanced stage 
building and general progress, as well 
the brilliancy of the general theme to 
followed, are in large measure due 
Pr< sident Collier. 

A large man in every sense, President 
Collier has indelibly stamped his strong 
and genial personality upon not only the 
exposition, but upon* San Diego. Under 
his leadership the people have readily re- 
sponded to the call for funds, subscribing 
at first for $1,000,000 worth of exposition 
stock, then issuing $1,850,000 worth of 
honds for park improvements, which, as 
the exposition is being built in Balboa 
Park, amounts to a bond issue for expo- 
sition purposes. 

necessity of preparing the harbor for the 
shipping of the world, due with the open- 
lr »g of the Panama Canal, the people voted 



Next, realizing the vital 



another $1,000,000 bond issue for dock- 
building and other harbor improvements, 
and now they are prepared to issue another 
$1,000,000 in bonds for further park im- 
provements if necessary. 

In the organization surrounding and 
supporting President Collier in this great 
work are many strong and competent 
men who, whether working as active ex- 
position officials, or acting as strong aids 
otherwise, go to strengthen and cement an 
organization whose efficiency and strength 
has been proven by its work. 

Second Vice-president G. A. Davidson is 
entitled to the honor of first conceiving 
and bringing forward the plan of an Inter- 
national Exposition in 1915 on the Pacific 
Coast in honor and celebration ot the 
opening of the Panama Canal, and al- 
though" San Diego cleared the way ^ by 
stepping from first place for San Francisco 
during the contest between that city and 
New Orleans for Federal recognition as 
the 1915 Exposition City, never tor a 




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.OS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDAIM) GUIDE 



Los ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



tlHM'CC 



moment was the plan to hold an exposition 
in San Diego relinquished or the prepara- 
tion for it abated. 

Vice-president Davidson, the originator 
of the 1915 Exposition project, presented 
his idea to the San Diego Chamber of Coin- 
in August, 1909, and he has re- 
mained an ardent worker for the con- 
summation of the great celebration to the 
present time. 

One of the busiest and most active men 
in the San Diego Exposition Building is 

II. 0. Davis, assistant to President I). C. 

Collier, and Director of Concessions. 

To Mr. Davis falls the difficult task of 
considering and segregating all applica- 
tions for concessions, passing upon their 

merit and admissibility, besides at lending 
to a great mass of detail work attaching 

to the office of the president, which lias 
been made doubly arduous by the enforced 
absence of President Collier during much 
of the time since the exposition project was 

launched. 

Winfield Hogaboom, Director of Pub- 

lieity and Exploitation, has been with the 
exposition project since its inception and 
the fact that San Diego and her invitation 
to the world to participate in the celebra- 
tion of the opening of the Panama Canal 
in 1915, is now known to the whole world, 
is due to his direction of publicity. To 
his work and that of his department is 

largely due the fact that San Diego, which 
had a population of 3D, 750, when the 
exposition was launched in 1909, now has 
80,000 people. 

H. J. Penfold, exposition secretary, has 

done, and is doing, a vast amount of 
work for the great enterprise, as, through 
his hands passes practically all the cor- 
respondence arising from the work of 



exposition building, which has many rami- 
fications. 

Frank M. Allen, Director of Works, un- 
der whose 'direct supervision is being 
arranged the whole plan of ex positional 
building and planning, performed the 
same great task for the recent Seattle 
fair, Avhere he proved his competency 
and strength as a director, engineer and 
organizer. The work of Mr. Allen's de- 
partment includes practically everything 
from the laying out and grading of the 
grounds to the final decoration of the 
last building, which includes details with- 
out end, and important features and 




FACADE, HOME ECONOMY HUILDING 



11 V 



duties which might well stagger 

master mind. 

The board of directors, headed by Presi- 
dent D. G. Collier, who is also Director 
General, consists of twenty energetic busi- 
ness men, well known throughout the 
country. They are: K. C. Allen, L. R. 
Barrow, L. A. Bloehman, K. J. Belcher 
Jr., George Burnham, William Clayton, <<• 
A. Davidson, C. W. Fox, D. F. Garretson, 
Percy Goodwin, I. I. Irwin, F. \V. Jack- 
son, H. II. Jones, W. V. Luddington, 
Arthur II. Marston, L. S. McLure, J. W. 
Sefton Jr., W. A. Sloan, John D. Spreck- 
els and C. L. Williams. 

President D. C. Collier, (J. A. Davidson, 

R. C. Allen, F. J. Belcher Jr., II. H. 



Jones 



• 



1\ II. Goodwin and W. A. Sloan 



institute the executive committee of tin; 

boardj and the officers are: I). C. Col- 
lar president; .John I). Spreckels, firs! 

v j r( . ^resident ; (J. A. Davidson, second 

vice [.resident; L. S. McLure, third vice- 
president ; George Burnham, fourth vice- 
president; V. W. Jackson, treasure!-, and 

II J. Penfold, secretary. 

When San Dieiro, will) a population of 
| ess than 40,000 in 1909, announced her 

intention of holding an exposition in 
1915 in celebration of the opening oi 

ll,<> Panama Canal there were a ureal 
lli; ,]iv people in the United Slater and 

fore jn countries who did not know where 

San DiegO was. There were a great main 

(l j] M >$ on the Pacific Coasl who laughed 

Hi 1 lie idea, and there were others who 

sne < ed and called it presumptuous, and 
a H joined in asking why .' They received 

the tnswer, which was this: 

San Diego, i lie oldest town on the coast. 
wm e Padre Junipero Serra, in 1769, es- 
tablished the first European settlement. 

making it then the first "port of call," 
i\ blished a precedent, which, with the 

opening of the Panama Canal, will be 

reeognized by the shipping of the world 
on its westward way through the greai 
en ecting water link in the maritinn 
cod tnerce of two oceans. 

E in Diego, which is about to be linked 
to the easl by the shortest and easiest 

graded t ranscontinental railroad, will be 

brought both by water and land trans- 
pe ition closer to the eastern seaboard. 

and consequently to the rest of the coun- 
try lying between, than will any other 

port on the Pacific Coast. 

S n Diego, besides having the first har- 
bor at which westbound vessels will touch 
on American soil, after passing through 
the canal, also has, in that same har- 
bor, one of the three greai harbors on 
the coast. Land locked, with plenty of 
natural depth to accommodate the largest 
ships afloat, and large enough to accom- 
modate the combined navies and mer- 
chant marine of the world, it must na- 
turally become tin 1 scene of great maritime 

activity within the first few years fol- 
lowing the opening of the canal. 

San Diego has back of il, a few miles 

inland, the great Imperial Valley, already 
^cognized as one of the richest, most 

fertile and extensive agricultural sections 



"" t,,e continent, destined to support a 

peater population. i n time, than the val- 
ley oJ the Nile. Northeast of this great 
'"'and empire are the storehouses con- 
tained in the lands of Arizona, recently 
reclaimed by the great Roosevelt project, 
and these again form another immense 
country, also tributary to San Diego, the 
natural gateway and market, the magic 
outlet to the sea, and consequent chea 

transportation. 

San Diego's climate, always an irresisti- 
ble magnet to those who know it, makes 
it possible to hold here an all-year expo- 
sition without varying and decided changes 




\ TOWER ON THE HOME ECONOMY 

BUILDING 








































LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 




BUILDING OF THE SEVEN SOUTHERN COUNTIES OF CALIFORNIA. JANUARY 1ST, 1914 



of temperature, such as must be encoun- 
tered anywhere else on the coast. 

In short, the very reasons which ac- 
count for San Diego's being at all, ac- 
count best for her claims for recognition 
as an exposition city, and barring her 
smallness of population she has every 
superior reason, unpossessed by any other 
coast city, to put forth her" claims for 

recognition in the matter of the 1915 ex- 
position. 

b Never before in the history of exposi- 
tion building has a city had the advan- 
tage of such united effort as has marked 
the progress of San Diego's work since 
the exposition project was launched. Never 
before have the men at the head of so 
great a project worked in such harmony 
for the accomplishment of a declared and 
settled purpose. Money has been raised 
by the city to the extent of four millions 
of dollars, including the million 
spent on harbor improvement, and what 
was said by some, two brief years ago, 
to be impossible, has already been re- 
corded among the things accomplished, 
and the exposition building goes merrily 
on. 

Located on the low hills overhanging 
the city and harbor, in the midst of beau^ 

Park, the exposition grounds 
acres of that 



being 



tiful Balboa 

615 



occupy 
beauty spot. 



great natural 
The grounds are bisected in 
many places by small ravines, and the 



whole is practically contained between 
what might be called the inverted walls 
of two deep canyons, leaving the exp< 
Hon grounds on a high table land betwe< n. 
One of these deep canyons, known as 
Cabrillo canyon, lies between the fair 
grounds and the city proper. This 
spanned by a beautiful reinforced c 

crete bridge of the Roman style of archi- 
tecture. It is carried by seven arches, the 
tallest of which holds the floor of the bri 
136 feet above the bottom of the canyon. 
Over this bridge will probably pass the 
greatest number of visitors to the exposi- 
tion, as it is nearest the city, and within 
less than fifteen minutes' walk of the wat< r- 
front, the centers of commerce and hotel 
accommodations. 

On the left of the bridge at the expo- 
sition, or eastern end, the first building 
encountered is the Administration Build- 
ing, where the business of the exposition 
is transacted. 

Next to the Administration Building, and 

towering above it, in splendid proportion, 
is the California State Building. Oppo- 
site this magnificent building and facing 
north is the Fine Arts Building. These 
two latter buildings consume the entire 
frontage of the Plaza de California, which 
is tapped, opposite the bridge entrance, 
by the main artery of the exposition, Hie 
"Prado." 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



On the north of the Prado stand the 
Administration Building, California State 
Building, Arts and Crafts Building, Horn.' 
Science Building, Eorticrulture and Agricul- 
ture Building, Botanical Building and the 

Southern California Building. 

Pacing the Prado on the south are the 
Fine Arts Building, the Ethnological Build- 
ii . the Mining Building, Foreign Arts 
Building, Commerce and Industry and 

S rvice Buildings. 

Ai the eastern gateway the Prado termi- 
nates in (he "Isthmus," upon which will 
be the sites of the innumerable amuse- 
ment concessions, extending to the north- 
ern gateway of the grounds, and enclos- 
ing the five-acre Southern California cit- 
i i grove and five-acre Southern Cali- 
fornia model rami, a five-acre California 
date grove, the little Landers concession, 

the reclamation service exhibit, the vil- 
lages of native American Indian tribes, 

and many of their historic battlefields^ 

and many other concessions. 

The Midland Drive is a noble boule- 
vard extending southward to the south 
j. e, and half circling the beautiful 
si ken garden, known as Canyon Es- 
1> ii..! on whose eastern shore stands the 
hospital and service buildings, and opposite 
tl sites of the exhibit buildings of 
Brazil ^ and other South American 

•untries. 





A TOWER ON THE COUNTIES BUILDING 



During a large part of the trip through 
and around the fair grounds the visitor 
is sheltered from the sun's rays by splen- 
did pergolas, covered with heavily blos- 
somed rose vines, and never once, while 




THE PRADO, JANUARY 1ST, 1914 






^^ 



~ r 4* 













LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 




STEEL FRAME WORK FOR DOME, BOTANICAL BUILDING, AS IT APPEARED JANUARY 1. 191 • 



out of doors, is he beyond a view of the 
harbor and ocean. 

The view from any point of the fair 
grounds is magnificent. The visitor looks 
out upon the city and a portion of Bal- 
boa Park, and down upon the harbor with 
its shipping from all corners of the world, 
which carries back and forth the com- 
merce and trade of all nations. Beyond 
is the beautiful little tourist city, Coro- 
nado, with its famous Hotel Del Coronado 
and its tent city, and just north of this 
is North Island, flat and smooth as _ a 
newly baked pancake, which, it is said, 
is destined to become a naval station 
before the opening of the exposition in 
1915. Here at present is the home of 

and navy aviation on the Pacific 
and daily the work of the govern- 
aviators in training for military 
scout duty may be seen from the 
fair grounds. 



army 
Coast, 
ment 
aerial 



in the Spanish Colonial architectural style, 
showing white and glistening in a setting 
of verdant green, relieved, artistically 
here and there by splashes of vivid color, 
applied by means of native flowers to the 
hillsides with an occasional colored don 
or minaret, enlivened by waving banners 
representing all the countries of the world, 
are spread over 615 acres of ground i 
the midst of a beautiful park in the cen- 
ter of the city. 

Other expositions of the past may ha\ 
been larger; they have without doubt 
contained in their architecture and e: 
hibits quantity better calculated to stun 
the mind of the visitor by their colossal 
proportions and almost incalculable bulk, 
but never before in the history of the 
world has there been a world's fair or 
exposition where the exhibits and dis- 
plays assembled teach so much of hum a 
history and world growth as will those 



Beyond Coronado and North Island of the San Diego 1915 Exposition. 



tosses the broad but placid Pacific, dotted 
in the distance by the Coronado Islands, 
the view being framed, so to speak, by 
Point Lorn a on the north and Point of 
Rocks on the Mexican side of the inter- 
national boundary on the south. 

Reverse the viewpoint and look at the 
exposition from shipboard, in the bay or 
from beyond the harbor at sea, and the 
exposition in turn presents a 
and imposing scene. The 



i 



buildings, 



beautiful 

all 



Other expositions have shown the visi- 
tor the products of every known corner 
of the earth, and the people who pro- 
duced them. This has been done so 
many times that expositions, from their 
commercial and other aspects have lit- 
tle interest for the people. It is generally 
realized that what has been shown at these 
great accumulations of commerce is noth- 
ing more than a large and somewhat 
diversified accumulation of those com- 



The 



modifies with which everyone is more or 
[ess familiar. The world, as a patron of 
^positions, is tired of this kind of show. 
just as theater audiences become tired 
of one kind of a play offered too many 
times. 

San Diego 1915 Exposition is 
planned to avoid everything contained in 
expositions of the past. Products here, 
whether of art or commerce, will be seen 
only as incidentals. The idea to be car- 
ried out is to show HOW THINGS ARE 
DONE, not a great accumulation of prod- 
ucts. For instance: Everyone has seen 
and admired the handiwork of the Navajo 
Indian in blanket making and silver or- 
naments. It would have been an easy 
matter for the departemnt of exhibits to 
have accumulated a very large and hand- 
si me collection of these things, but be- 
yond a cursory glance, the patrons of the 
position would have paid little heed to 
such an exhibit, not only because its 
theme is archaic, but because there would 
be so much in the same general line that 
little attention would be paid to it. Un- 
der the plan adopted, however, the blank- 
i s will be noticed and much admired, as 
will the silver ornaments, because the 
Navajo women will be seen preparing the 
wool, spinning the yarn and weaving the 
blankets, and the native silversmiths, sur- 
i >unded by their rude tools and imple- 



ments, will be seen beating out the sil- 
ver shaping it and engraving the finished 



trinkets. 



Everywhere this 
first, products last, 
even to the things 



theme 



of processes 

is to be carried out, 
w shown in the conces- 
sions, just as far as the things displayed 
make such a course possible. Native 
workmen and women from the peoples of 
the far north, where fur industries pre- 
vail, to the work done by the natives 
of the sunny south, will *be seen, sur- 
rounded by their crafts, furnishings and 
home conditions, as far as it is possible 
to transplant or reproduce them in Cali- 
fornia climate, and they will be doing 
the things they do at home, in their 
native ways. 

Products will be seen, yes, but in the 
main they will only be seen as the final 
result of what the people have been seen 
doing, and they will disappear almost 

as they are brought into exis- 
tence. 

This 



as fast 



through 
ize the 
ever it 



theme of evolution, of historv 
processes, has served to popular- 
San Diego 1915 Exposition wher- 
has been exploited, with the re- 
sult that the exposition, which started out 
to be an affair of the Southwest, has 
grown till it has become international in 
its scope, and every effort is being mad; 
by the directorate to furnish the addi- 
tional room and accommodation demanded. 







^■' 








































r r i fi 



a. ■'- v t 






l*< 



t t 



-/. 







Long Beach. 



California 



mic 



m 



Absolutely Fireproof 



American Plan 



Famous The World Over 

For its Excellence of Cuisine 
and Thoroughness of Service 

ery Outdoor Recreation to both Divert and Amuse 

Golf, Tennis, Motoring, Horseback Riding 

Driving, Yachting, Fishing 

HOME OF THE CELEBRATED LONG BEACH BATH HOUSE 







Notable Hotels gf California 



Offering To Their Guests Widely Varying Attractions, 
Each Presenting Some Special Charm of Its O 



wn 



Southern California offers an unusual 
number of delightful hotels for the choice 
of the hotel seeker, and most of them 
have a distinction which renders a 
slay within their hospitable walls, be 
it for a season or only for a single meal, 
;i pleasure long to be treasured in 
memory. Situated in widely different 
localities, they offer widely varying 
attractions, each presenting some special 

charm of its own. They climb the 
hill slopes, rest on the mountain tops, 
nestle in the valleys, dip their feet in 
the ocean, or border city pavements. 
They offer to their guests wide sweep of 
vision, golf, tennis and polo, the coun- 
try for walking and driving, the ocean 
for boating, bathing and fishing, the moun- 
tain side for hunting, the old missions 
and landmarks of the early days for ex- 
ploration, or the city for urban pleasures. 
At each hotel one or more of these at- 
tractions awaits the traveler, while com- 
mon to all of them is pure, balmy air, 
the beauty and odor of flowers, charming 
looms, careful service and a cuisine suited 
to the most fastidious. 

The large hotels of Los Angeles and 
San Diego are the peers of metropolitan 
hotels anvwhere. Beginning with Los An- 
geles, the Hotel Alexandria is conve- 
niently located on Fifth Street, between 
Broadway and Hill. A spacious lobby 
with columns and wainscot of colored 
marbles forms an inviting entrance and 
luxurious lounging room. 



The Franco- 



Italian dining salon and the tea room, 
adorned with Pan playing his pipes at 
the fountain among the flowers, are most 
attractive. On the mezzanine floor is a 
gallery with writing tables, a library, 
ladies' parlor and ballroom with pale 
gray brocaded satin walls. The hotel con- 
tains seven hundred rooms and suites, 



cr 



thirty with pianos and a number with 
private dining-rooms. In the basement is 
the mission Indian grill with the uniqu 
decorations its name implies. 

The Angelus at Fourth and Sprin^ 
streets, the Hotel Lankershim at Broad" 
way and Seventh Street, and the Van 
Nuys at Fourth and Main streets are 
dignified hotels of a type similar to the 
Alexandria. They are all well located 
for business, shopping or sight seeing, and 
furnish every comfort, convenience and 
luxury demanded by the traveling public. 
Simplicity is the keynote of the fur- 
nishing of the Van Nuys, the pleasing 
simplicity which it takes an artist to 
effect. The pretty Peacock lounging room 
on the second floor is attractive to those 
who prefer its quiet aloofness to the 
bustle of the lobby. The Van Nuys en- 
deavors to create a homelike atmosphere 
for the stranger and caters to particu- 

cafe of this hotel has 

excel- 



lar people, 
long borne 
lence both 



of this 
reputation for 
and 



room is 
and 



a 



The 
a just 

in cuisine and service, 
charming production in 



The 
white 



gold. 



All the above hotels are on the Euro- 
pean plan, as is also the Westminster at 
Fourth and Main streets. This hotel has 
long been a well established favorite 
among substantial permanent residents of 
Los Angeles and well-to-do tourists. It 
is conveniently located, with theaters and 
shopping district in the immediate vicin- 
ity, and with electric cars for all points 
in the city, for the beaches and the moun- 

doors. Seventy-five 

each have 



tains, 



passing its 
rooms, single and en suite, 
large bay windows overlooking the busy 

The cafe has a well deserved 
for its excellence as well as 

A table d'hote 
for fifty cents 



streets. 

reputation 

for its moderate prices. 

luncheon is served daily 

which cannot be surpassed for the price. 






LOS A.NGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 






THE 



ANGELUS 



LOS ANGELES 






















LOCATION 



SERVICE 



EQUIPMENT 

The Angelas, located at Fourth and Spring Streets, is in the midst of the business, theatre, 
banking and shopping center.. All street car lines close at hand. Famous f, 

comfort, many conveniences and its excellent grill. 

European Plan Only. Rates from $1.50 per day and up 



ou8 tor us (|uk 



LOOM IS BROS., Proprietors 













A SECTION OF THE SPACIOUS LOBBY OF THE HOTEL ANGELUS 

On the mezzanine floor above are cozy retreats and a beautiful painting of the famous picture, "The Angelus, 

from which the hotel derived its name 



Away from the business center, but 
still in Los Angeles, is the Hotel Holly- 
wood situated at the base of the Santa 

Monica mountains. The wide spreading 
hospitable building contains one hundred 
and fifty rooms and is encircled by spa- 
cious porches which can be enjoyed win- 
ter or summer. The refreshing ocean 
breeze, palms and luxuriant shrubbery 
temper the warm days, while gay flowers 
and sweet odors make the winter tourist 

forget the discomforts of the ice-bound 
East. The kitchens are immaculately kept 
and open at all times for inspection of 

guests. The dining-room overlooks a beau- 
tiful garden. Many of the sleeping-rooms 
have private balconies or sleeping porches 
which command beautiful views of the 
foothills. Weekly dances, billiards, card 
rooms and tennis courts are free to guests. 

Midway between Los Angeles and the 

ocean is the beautiful Beverly Hills Hotel, 

also on the American plan. The archi- 



tecture blends well with the background. 

while the Outlook from the sit< is mag- 
nificent. It includes the Santa Monica 
mountains, the nearby rolling hills cov- 
ered with orchard, vineyard or natural 
growth and six miles away the shore of 
?he Pacific. At night the sparkling, scin- 
tillating lights of Los Angeles, and above 
the shining stars, transform the scene 
into one of mysterious, witching beauty. 
The main dining-room is very attractive 
with low windows affording distant views 
and the nearer outlook on the flowers and 
foliage of the hotel grounds. Many of 
i he rooms have out-door sleeping porches. 
The ample grounds are laid out in lawns 
ornamented with trees and flowers. One 

Not onlv 



acre is devoted to the guests. 

they cut the flowers from it, but 

and raise them in individual gar- 

they wish. Everything to in- 

amuse the guests is close at 

The Los An- 



may 

plant 
dens if 



terest and 

hand or within easy reach. 

sreles Country Club, with its justly famed 








Conceded bv 



The Raymond 

PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 

exacting critics to be the most superbly located hotel on the American 

continent, with every appointment perfect. 



DECEMBER UNTIL MAY 



WALTER RAYMOND, Proprietor 
















Hotel Hollywood 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

A strictly modern, high class American Plan hotel situated at the base of the Santa 
MomcaMounta.ns within the city limits and midway between the business distr ct and 
he Pacfic Ocean, making it one of the most attractive suburban hotels in Southern Cali- 
fornia It ha. the umque extinction of offering its guests the advantages and pleasures 
of the mountains, city and sea. F 

Visitors will find this charming hostelry essentially and first of all a home hotel for 
those who appreciate the comforts of life, while enjoying the unequaled climaticTdvanUge" 

GEO. S. KROM, Manager 






LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



olf eourse and fine new club bouse, ad- 
joins the hold. Electric cars pass the 
hole! and reach the heart of the business 
center of Los Angeles in twenty- live min- 
utes. 



Pasadena has 

one 



four 



iave risen 



after the 



great hotels which 

other, to ac- 
commodate the ever-increasing winter 
travel to Southern California. Of these 
the Raymond was the first. It occupie 
;i superb position, crowning an eminence 
aboui a mile from the center of Pasa- 
dena. The hotel is surrounded by its own 
beautiful grounds, a park of eighty acres 

hidi embraces one of the finest 

eourses in Southern California, rolling 

lawns, shady flower-bordered paths and 

ves of blossoms to supply the public 

tid private munis. The commanding site 

(fords scenes of wonderful beauty 

tretching away on every side;, from the 

lower-embroidered surroundings of the 
hotel away up to the snow crowned heights 

I the Sierra Madre or over the smiling 



biles of guests. 



golf 



fields and orchards 
\ alley. Across the 
building stretch the 
erandas which with 
furnishings are one 
ileliirhi ful features. 



of the San Gabriel 
entire front of the 

wide rose wreathed 
their rugs and cozy 

of the hotel's most 

guests 



Here the 



gather to re [, write, cbal or play card 
and here afternoon tea is served. Be- 
sides the fine golf links and tennis courts 
many other out-door attractions await the 
guests of the Raymond. Beautiful drives 
and walks, mountain trails and smooth 
automobile roads are close at hand; car- 
riages and fine saddle horses are kept on the 
hotel grounds and burros are provided 
for the children. A well equipped garage 
furnishes accommodation for the automo- 

Tlie hotel is under the 
personal management of the proprietor, 
Mr. Walter Raymond, who for a num- 
ber of years was president of the Ray- 
mond-Whitcomb Company. It is conducted 
on the American plan. The season is 
from the middle of December until the 
first of June. 

The Hotel Green covers with its im- 
mense fireproof buildings nearly two city 
blocks in the heart of Pasadena. The 
group consists of the east, center and 
west buildings with the steel and cement 
covered corridors that span the street. 
Together they provide nine and a quarter 
acres of floor space, sufficient room for 
the diversified entertainment of guests 
even were the hotel not surrounded bv 
a city and outlying country of surpass- 




HOLLYWOOD HOTEL, HOLLYWOOD 



« IF 



I r-*- 



















LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 










Where Shall 




Eat 



and The Answer 



For years I have catered to those 
who discriminate. Well-cooked food 
properly served, clean linen, mod- 
erate prices and courteous service. 

Open day and night. 

The Eating Problem satisfactorily 
solved at the 



Fitch 



C^afe 











G. W. FITCH 

Formerly connected with Westminster and Met 
ropole Hotels, Los Angeles. Also 20 years 
with N. Y. and Florida Hotels. 



353 S. SPRING STREET 



Los Angeles 



Beautiful 



DEL MAR 



(San Diego 
County) 



Ever\- Charm of a Picturesque California Resort, Combining Ocean, Mountain 

and Valley 
















STRATFORD INN 



Owned and operated by South Coast 




Company, Inc. 



nd£ntelvC™Zl Tl y SPQl ° f lhC P f ifiC ^^ ThcrC arC mil68 " f COnt0U ' ™ads through Torry Pines 

f 1 hi T.lhZnT t Pr ° Pe ; y COl )T' S u hC T 8 : PCrfeCt building 8itea imaginable and already many delight- 

ful homes have been erected by residents of Southern California. An ideal location for a summer or winter bungalow. 



SOUTH COAST 



Phones, Main 227— Home F 1788 



COMPANY 

705 Garland Bldg., Los Angeles 



ing attractions. The hotel contains, be- 
sides Mio usual public rooms of charming 
arrangement, more than live hundred largo 
guest chambers, three hundred and fifty 

with attached baths, and a large roof 
garden adorned with tropical plants and 
partly enclosed with glass. The hotel is 
conspicuous in the judgment of wide 

travelers for its good food, good cheer, 

good music and painstaking entertain- 
ment ; in short for all the factors of 
pleasant living. The Green plays a large 
pari in the social life of the city, and is 
the scene of many brilliant entertain- 
ments. The buildings are surrounded by 
parks. A city park of ten acres adjoins 
it on the south. A new tennis court and 

lawn golf course have been added to the 

attractions of the hotel grounds. The 
privileges of the Annandale golf course 
and club house and of the Altadena club 

house and links are available for the 

guests of the Hotel Green. 

The Hotel Maryland with its adorn- 
ment of vines and flowers, its setting of 
lawns and trees and shrubbery, its pic- 
turesque cottages and bungalows sur- 
rounded by tropical gardens, is an un- 
qualified bit of paradise in the midst of a 
citv which as a whole mav iustlv lav 
claim to the name. The hotel is located 

on Colorado Street, the principal street 
of Pasadena, and being open throughout 
the year, is the scene of much of the 
city's social life, as well as a delightful 
home for tourists and winter residents. 
As Mrs. Robert J. Bunlette has said: 
"Its doors have been ever ready to 
swing inward to further the interests of 

> 

philanthropic work, centralize art, music 

"i- literature, or for the lighter pleasures 
<>f life." The stranger who is a guest 

at the Maryland finds these pleasures and 
interests open to him. and shares in the 
festivities of the charity ball, weekly 
musicals and dances, and the Xew Year's 
Tournament of Roses. The old English 
music room: the dining-room, seating 
nearly a thousand people and command- 
ing from its French windows a view of 
the vine-draped Maryland pergola, the 
grill room prepared for cozy, informal 
feasting, the spacious lobby and cheer- 
ful morning room with its enormous win- 
dow, framing a rarely beautiful scene, are 
some of the obvious attractions for the 
gregarious, while for those disposed ^ to 
repose and withdrawal are quiet writing 



and card rooms and, best of all. the cot- 
tages and bungalows wherein the privi y 
of family life may be enjoyed, togeth 
with all the advantages of a fine hotel. 
There are twenty-six of these sepa] 
homes furnishing apartments of from I 
lo twelve rooms. In some cases ther 
are from two to four apartments in a 
cottage. Meals may be taken at the 
hotel or served in charcoal ovens dire 
from the hotel kitchen. Many of the 
bungalows are built in Spanish style en- 
closing a palio. 

Since the above was written, the Mary- 
land was totally destroyed by tire in April 
last, but will be rebuilt at mice upon ti 

same site. None of the bungalows wei 
burned and during the interval before th 
doors of the new Maryland are opened, 
these and one of the large wings <»f th 
Hotel Huntington, will he kept open for 
the accommodation of the Maryland* 
guests. The new Maryland will surpass in 
luxury and comfort the one destroyed. 

The Hotel Huntington, on Oak Knoll 
Pasadena, is operated by the same raai 
agement as the Maryland. It is a prince! 

building with vine-covered pergolas an 
arched corridors; with sunny courts and 
shady lawns whereon the transplanted 
palm mingles with indigenous live oaks; 
with gardens designed by an artist, and 

with an interior in keeping with its mag- 
nificent setting on the edge of a mesa 
above the San Gabriel Vallev. The Hunt- 
ington has its own golf links on which 
stands the oldest Spanish mill in 
fornia. Besides this private course, guests 
at the Huntington may have the privil- 
eges of the Annandale. the Altadena and 
the San Gabriel Country clubs. 

Pasadena and its surroundings offer a 
thousand delights for the tourist or win- 
ter resident, scenery unsurpassed, untold 
miles of the finest motoring roads, beaches 
and mountains and the city pleasures of 
Los Angeles within easy reach of the 
hotels. These large hotels make up thea- 
ter parties for their guests and conduct 
excursions to all points of interest. The 
Pasadena horse show, the polo games and 
the beautiful New Year's tournament of 
roses are further winter attractions. 

The Alpine Tavern is perched on a 

shelf high up on the side of Mount Lowe 
at the end of the Mount Lowe electric 
railway. It is surrounded by beautiful 
trees, pine and live oak. wherein birds 



Cali- 




-,■%.■''• 


















VERY modern conven- LuxunousLobbyscene 

Unexcelled din- 
ing room service, 
refined home-like atmosphere 
prevailing here is rarely found 
in a hotel so centrally located. 
Street cars for every direction 
pass the doors. 

The clerk at any of the 
hotels in this book will wire 
reservation for you. 



HOTEL 

VAN NUYS 

C H. KNAPPE, Manager 

LOS ANGELES 

















LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GTIDK 



and squirrels make merry, all so tame 
that they will almost eat out of one's 
hand. The Tavern is supplied with every 
convenience and the cuisine is excellent. 
The spacious lobby with its big stone 
fireplace seems to welcome all comers. 

From the Tavern the trip to the top of 

Mount Lowe may be continued, if de- 
sired, on burros or horseback. The place 
is delightful for a stay of a few hours 
or for weeks of quiet rest above the 
clouds and strife of the city — literally 
above the clouds, for sometimes the waves 
and billows of fog- may be seen tossing 
below, while about the Tavern and above 
is sunshine and peace. 




On the sands of 



Long 



World-famous "Arrowhead Mountain" and the famous 

sanitarium at its base 



p' 



Beach, faein 
the blue Pacific, only thirty-five minutes 
car-ride from Los Angeles, stands the 
beautiful Hotel Virginia, one of the fi- 
nest beach resort hotels in the world. It 
s built of reinforced concrete in the form 
of the letter 



H, 



every one of its two 
hundred and fifty rooms having an out- 
side exposure. The north front overlooks 
a broad avenue of palms with views of 
the mountains in the distance. A stay 
at this charming hotel gives the traveler 
a chance to become acquainted with the 
sen in all its moods. The large concrete 



tennis courts southeast of the hotel af- 
ford from the spectator's seats another 
splendid view of the ocean. The con- 
crete walks and broad steps leading from 
the hotel down to the sands are draped 
with ivy and bordered with flowers. The 
Virginia Country Club is only fifteen min- 
utes' ride from the hotel and offers 
various pleasures for the guests of the 
hotel, golf, tennis and trap shooting, also 
musicals and social affairs. Bathing, fish- 
ing and boating are the especial delights 



of 



the Virginia. 



From the long 



pier 





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STRATFORD INN, DEL MAR 






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LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



near by many fish are taken with rod 
and reel. This may be varied by trolling 
from a launch for large, fish in the open 
sea. Catalina Island is only two hours 
away and here is sport for the most ex- 
pert fishermen. The Hotel Virginia is 
headquarters for the Sunset Yacht Club 
and from the verandas a fine view of the 
racing may be had on regatta days. A 
driveway extends for miles south along 
the bluff over the ocean. The beach also 
affords a fine speedway. Horseback riders 
delight in a canter along its hard sands. 
The hotel Casa Loma is situated on 
slightly rising ground in the northern 
part of the beautiful city of Redlands, 
and it commands a magnificent view over 
the valley to the snow-capped mountains 
beyond. Broad verandas and shady lawns 
give opportunity for the restfnlly inclined 
to enjoy outdoor life, while the more 
active may fill their time with automo- 
bile trips, horseback riding, coaching, golf, 
tennis, croquet, walking or fishing. Trout 
fishing in nearby mountain streams is 
very good. The social life of the hotel 
is well looked after, and the service is 
of the best. Redlands itself is beauti- 
fully situated in the midst of orange 
groves which extend through the valley 
to the mountains that wall it in and the 
scenery afforded by the drives and walks, 
or obtained from the hotel windows, is 

a far country to 

see. 

The Arrowhead Hot Springs Hotel is a 

health resort, but also a luxurious hotel 
where the healthy tourist may enjoy him- 
self, availing himself or not as he chooses 
of the steam baths, mud baths and min- 
eral water which are useful in many dis- 
orders. The waters are said to possess 
the same curative value as those of Carls- 
bad. The hotel is beautifully situated 
facing the San Bernardino Valley, under 
the great arrowhead half way up Arrow- 
head Mountain, and the views from its 
windows and veranda are superb. Within 
a short distance from the hotel on one 
side are boiling springs and steam caves; 
on the other side the springs and stream 
are icy cold. Connected with the hotel 
is a well equipped stable, where burros 
and saddle horses can be obtained for 
the mountain rides. Safe trails lead to 
wild canyons or to vantage points for 
particularly impressive views. There are 
many beautiful walks to be taken and 
fine roads for automobiles. The hotel is 
only thirty minutes distant by electric 



worth traveling from 



car from the 
Bernardino. 



busy little .city of San 



Stratford Inn is a charming half-tim- 
bered, English-looking hold situated at 
Del Mar, twenty-two miles north of San 
Diego, on the Santa Fe line between Los 
Angeles and San Diego. It stands high 
above the sea, commanding a glorious 
view of the distant hills, of the Pacific 
and of the surf-washed beach at its feet. 
The wide, firm stretch of sand is delight- 
ful for bathing, fishing, horseback riding 
or motoring. Just below the hotel, nearer 
the beach, stands Los Banos, a complete 
bath house containing, among other con- 
veniences, an immense plunge bath of 
ocean water, warmed and frequently 
changed. An eight hundred foot pleasure 
pier extends from the bluff near Los 
Banos and along its length surf fishing 
is successfully practiced. Good quail and 
duck hunting is found nearby; golf, ten- 
nis, croquet, canoeing, deep sea fishing, 
riding, driving and walking are other 
forms of amusement readily accessible. 
There are many picturesque places in the 
vicinity to be visited, the Cave of the 
Winds, the Witch's Cauldron, the Punch 
Bowl, Wave Crest, where is obtained ; 
wonderful view, over valley and mesa, of 
the mountains of Mexico, and to the 
north the snowy heads of San Antonio, 
San Bernardino and the San Jacinto 
range. 

San Diego is well prepared to provide 
not only comfortable, but luxuriously for 
the throng of exposition visitors she is 
looking for in 1915. 

The U. S. Grant Hotel is located in the 
heart of San Diego, on a main business 
street, opposite the pretty Plaza Park, 
with its handsome fountain and fine palms. 
The hotel is of fireproof construction, a 
beautiful sDecimen of concrete architec- 



ture, 



specimen 
consisting of 



t-< 



two wings joining a 



central building at right angles. A unique 
feature which delights all guests is the 
palm garden which fills the space between 
the two wings above the imposing en- 
trance. Second floor rooms open with 
French windows on this beautiful spot. 
A fountain plays in the center, surrounded 
by aquatic plants. Palms and ferns and 
the vine-draped pergola which covers it 
make it appear like a beautiful garden. 
All the rooms are sunny, with outside 
exposure. The Bivouac Grill is a unique 
room, with military decorations to honor 
the great name which the hotel bears. 
mural paintings, (lags and seals of 



The 



- *-«. 



■^^g 



m 













> I 


















Coronado 



Tent 



City 



IS DELIGHTFULLY COOL ALL SUMMER 







Combines all the attractive features for entertainment and rest 
so necessary to ensure a pleasant sojourn for visitors, and the 
conveniences of city life, minus its annoyances. 

Just Across the Bay from San Diego 

Four Hundred Palm Tent Houses, Palm Cottages and Bunga- 
lows neatly and comfortably furnished. Gas for cooking, elec- 
tric lights and other conveniences. These cozy homes vary in 



om 



mo 



No 



can a summer vacation be spent as economically and at the 
same time so thoroughly enjoyable as at TENT CITY. Bay 
and Surf Bathing, (open air cement lined pool for women and 
children where free swimming instruction is given), boating, and 
deep sea fishing. Out of door life predominates but there are 
plenty of indoor attractions: Dancing every evening, Matinee 
Thes Dansants, musicales and card parties. 

CONCERTS EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENING 

(Except Monday Afternoon) by 

Chiaffarelli's Italian Band of Thirty Pieces — Ten Soloists 

Commencing June 21. 

LEAVE CARE BEHIND AND COME TO TENT CITY 

OPENS JUNE 1 

Write for Booklet, GEO. A. CHENEY, Manager, 

CORONADO BEACH, CALIFORNIA 

i Angeles Agent, H. F. NORCROSS, 334 South Spring Street. 



LOS ANGELES-SAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 










I 










NMWHI 






. 






U. S. GRANT HOTEL— SAN DIEGO 






the great nations are all in keeping with 
this idea. Both grill and dining-room 
bear a well-deserved reputation for the 
excellence and cosmopolitan variety of 
their food. Opening from the eighth and 
ninth floors • are two large roof gardens, 
ench covering a quarter of an acre. The 
entire ninth floor of the hotel is devoted 
to a ballroom or convention hall, the same 
immense room serving for both purposes. 
During balls or entertainments held here, 
or in one of the large music rooms on 
'the eighth floor, the roof gardens are 
[touch used for promenades. The hotel is 
finely equipped with every variety of bath, 
including two large plunges filled with 
salt water pumped directly from the ocean 
and constantly changed. Guests of the 
hotel are accorded the privileges of the 
point Loma club house, a fifteen minute 
ride from the hotel. Here polo, golf or 



tennis may be enjoyed almost every day 
in the year. Motoring, yachting, rowing, 
fishing and sea bathing are other avail- 
able pleasures. 

The San Diego is a new million dollar, 
reinforced concrete building, fireproof, 
thoroughly modern, and conveniently lo- 
cated for business or pleasure. All car 
lines pass its doors and it is only a short 
distance from the postoffice, custom house, 
all the prominent stores, the banks and 
the new Spreckels Theater Building. It 
is on the European plan. 

The Hotel del Coronado is in a class by 
itself. Its location on a narrow strip of 
land between the ocean and the bay would 
lend distinction to any building, but when 
charm of situation is enhanced by the 
great wide stretching structure surrounded 
by a park and enclosing a patio filled 
with trees and flowers and singing birds, 



I- 
















c^Vleet me 



Manx 



Nearest to Everything 










UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF 

Chester W. Kelley 



LOS A.NGELES-SAN DlKfiO STAN DA l; I) GUIDE 



the result is a hotel offering unusual at- 

tractions. On one side the surf washes 

the sands only a few feet from the hotel 

window-; on the other the smooth lawns, 
brilliant flowers and noble trees present 

an entirely different scene, while within 
the quiet patio one seems miles away from 
all that can vex or annoy. Within the 
hotel is every convenience and luxury 

known to modem hotel life with addi- 
tional comforts rarely found. The home 

feature is emphasized everywhere. Many 

of the rooms and suites have private 
piazzas which are furnished a- living- 
rooms or sleeping porches as desired. 
An open air school is open all the year, 

giving individual instruction to children of 

any grade or from any school, so that they 

may keep up with the classes they have 

left al home. The Montessori method is 

used for young children. A well equipped 
playground is located on the beach. 

Outdoor life is so emphasized thai many 
of the attractive indoor rooms seem 



scarcely needed, but they are all there, 

** rooms, writ- 



lobby, card rooms, readin 



ing rooms, billiard and ball rooms, sun 

parlors and casino. Verandas and bal- 
conies are everywhere and from them and 
Prom all the windows are beautiful views 
of the ocean, or of San Diego harbor, 
the city and mountains in the distance. 
The grounds of the hotel are thirty-five 
acres in extent. The hotel itself cover- 
four and a half acres. Surf bathing may 
be enjoyed nearby. Yachting, canoeing, 

w aL * e 

favorite pastimes of many. The Coro- 
nado Country Club Provides golf links. 
tennis courts and polo grounds for other-. 
There are splendid roads for riding and 

driving, and no end of interesting ex- 
cursions to be taken. The hotel manage- 
ment arranges weekly motor picnics to 
the Cuyamaca mountains or beach. The 
hotel is conducted on the American plan 
with cuisine and service of the highest 

excellence. 



rowing, motor boating and fishing 









M f 






HOTEL DEL CORONAOO SAX DIEGO 



* 



r 



















SAN DIEGO 



Kin 




George Hotel 




CALIFORNIA 



San Diego IS BUILDING a Unique Exposition, which will be open an entire year. 
January 1st is the date of opening and December 31st the closing day. You will visit San 
Diego then and we request the privilege of entertaining you during your visit. 

Our location is in walking dis- 
tance of the Exposition grounds 
and in the midst of Theaters, 
Churches, Public Library and 
Shopping District, but is quiet 
and homelike. 

OUR RATES 

Roo?n Without Bath 

$1.00 and $1.50 one person 
$1.50 and $2.00 two persons 

Room With Bath 

$1.50 and $2.00 one person 
$2.00 and $2.50 two persons 




BRYSON 



APARTMENTS 



Wilshire and Rampart, Los Angeles 



For reservations write or telegraph W. W. MYERS, Manager 



When You Visit LOS ANGELES 

stay at the 




SCing 

Fifth and Los Angeles Streets 



A FIREPROOF, Glass A, Building, 
phones, Steam Heat, Hot and Gold 
in every room. 

ALL OUTSIDE ROOMS 



Tele- 
Water 



RATES: EUROPEAN PLAN 

Without Bath, Single £1.00 
Without Bath, Doubled. 50 
With Bath, Single . $1.50 
With Bath, Double . £2.00 



day 
day 
clay 
day 



up 
up 
up 
up 



King Edward Hotel Co., Props 

Walter E. Smith, President 
Paul G. Helrner, Manager 

Free Bus Meets Trains 




FIREPROOF— EXCLUSIVE 

EQUIPMENT LAVISH 

SURROUNDINGS UNEQUALED 



REGULAR HOTEL SERVICE 

RATES 
COMPARATIVELY LOWEST 



WISE & MILLSPAUGH, Lessees 

SURPASSING ANY APARTMENT HOTEL IN THE WEST 









LOS ANGELES-SAN DIKCO STANDARD GUIDK 







Santa Barbara By- The-Sea 

CALIFORNIA 



The Potter Hotel is situated about five hundred feet from the shore 

of the Pacific; in the background are the Sierras, majestic, against 
an Italian sky. 

Santa Barbara and the adjoining valley, Montecito, are the pleasure 
grounds of the West. 

The Potter is the hub around which all life centres. Golf links, 
tennis courts, swimming and horse-back riding form only a part of the 
out-door and invigorating existence of this charming place. 

Luxurious accommodations for one thousand guests. Stop-over privi- 
leges on Coast-line trains. 



The Hotel Potter at Santa Barbara 
crowns a knoll formerly known as Bur- 
ton Mound, on which for unknown years 
has gushed forth a sulphur spring. The 
water si ill hubbies up in a marble basin 
in the lobby of the hotel. Beautiful 
park-like grounds of wide extent surround 
the building and slope down to the Palm 
Boulevard which borders the sea. A more 
charming setting can scarcely be imagined, 
acres of velvet lawns, rose gardens with 
thousands of bushes which bloom nearly 
the whole year through, hundreds of other 
plants and shrubs, at least a mile of 
asphall walks and driveways bordered by 

blazing scarlet geraniums and beyond it 
all the blue Pacific. Every window of 
the hotel frames a picture. The comfort- 
able chairs of the wide veranda invite 
one to rest and enjoy the sight. Within 
the house is every comfort which a large, 
luxurious hotel can provide. The table 
is largely supplied with products of the 

Poller farm, thus insuring pure milk, 
cream and butter, and a prime quality 
in eggs, poultry, squabs and vegetables. 
Even a large portion of the meats are 
supplied by the farm. The hotel is op- 
erated on the American plan. Within 
the grounds are asphalt tennis courts, 
garage and livery stables where nearly 
iwo hundred horses are kept for riding 
and driving. In one part of the grounds 
is a menagerie and a deer park. The 
Potter Country Club is an adjunct of the 
Hotel Potter and offers every convenience 
of a first-class club as well as facilities 
for out-door sports, including polo and 

golf. It occupies about one hundred and 
fifty acres of the celebrated Hope ranch. 
The club house is on a knoll overlooking 
a pretty fresh water lake. From the 

veranda almost the whole of the club 

Breakfasts, lunch- 
served either in 



grounds can be seen. 



the 



pretty grill 



eons and teas are 

room or on the verandas 

looking* out on the wooded hills. The 
club grill is operated in conjunction with 
the hotel dining-room. Spanish and South- 
ern dishes are a specialty. 

There are scores of delightful rides and 
drives in the vicinity of Santa Barbara. 
The surrounding scenery is wonderfully 
beautiful, and the equable climate en- 
ables one to enjoy out-door life to the 
utmost. All the delights the sea can 
offer are to be enjoyed here. Annual 
regattas bring* representatives from every 
important club on the coast and the Hotel 



Potter is the headquarters of social ac- 
tivities. The Santa Barbara channel af- 
fords fine deep sea fishing. The Hotel 
Potter is only a step from the Southern 
Pacific station and stop-over privileges 
are granted on all through coast line 
tickets. 

Another charming hotel of Santa Bar- 
bara is the New Arlington, a reinforced 
concrete, fireproof hotel, built en the site 
of the old Arlington which in the earlv 



« 



seventies was the most important resort 
hotel in California. It stands in five 
acres of lawn embellished by flowers and 
handsome trees, many of them palms of 
large growth. Neither brains nor money 
lias been spared to make a safe, substan- 
tial hotel fitted with every luxury. The 
architect has borrowed freely from the 
missions in his design, making an adap- 
tion of some of their best features. The 
terraced towers strongly suggest those of 
the Santa Barbara Mission. 

Among all the charming hotels of 
Southern California the Glenwood Mission 
Inn at Riverside stands out by itself. It 
is the hotel that is different. It was built 
con amore and is carried on in the same 
spirit. The architecture is an adapta- 
tion and mingling of the best from all 

the missions, the arches, the corridors, the 
patio, the campanile and the tiled floors 
and roof. It is typically California!), 
yet unlike any other hotel in California 
or elsewhere, either in its material as- 
pect or in the atmosphere which per- 
vades it. It breathes peace and quietness 
upon all who enter the shady courtyard 
and cross its threshold. Over an entrance 
to one of the inner rooms is the motto 
"Ye canna be baith grand and comfort- 
able," and the atmosphere of the inn is 
a practical exemplification of this. The 
luxury of the place is in the way of care- 
ful service, delicious meals, beauty, har- 
mony and objects of interest on every 
side. For all its air of simplicity no 
hostelry was ever more carefully planned 
and built and furnished. All Europe has 
been ransacked and the results claim at- 
tention on every side, yet everything is 

fitting and harmonious. 

of the building was 

owner and proprietor, Mr. 
Frank Miller, in 1902. The cloister room 
was added in 1910. The building, occupy- 
ing 1 a full city block, is of brick and con- 
crete, enclosing on three sides a patio 
filled with flowers, shrubs and vines. It 



The 



built 



main part 
bv the 






Make Your Home at 





MONTE 



The Perfect All - the-Year- Round Resort 
On Monterey Bay, 125 Miles South of San Francisco 













Visit the Exposition by motor from Del Monte via the New Asphalt State 
Highway thru the beautiful Salinas and Santa Clara Valleys— by the San 
Juan Mission — the Leland Stanford University and many wonderful resorts. 



The Riviera of Americ 



The Golfers Paradise 



Most Wonderful Park and Grounds 



Thru parlor car daily from San Francisco. Motoring over 1 1-„^ j_^ llvc 
and Scenic Boulevard. Tennis, Archery, Sailing, Surf Bathing and Fishing. 



M 



American Plan Only. 



$5.00 per day and up. 



The Famous Del Monte Golf Course 

Only five minutes walk from the hotel lobby. Professi 



onal instructors. 



* A 



1 



The Pacific Grove Hotel 



Three miles from Del Monte 



American plan only. Rates from $3.00 up. 



Under same Management 



ADDRESS 



H. R. WARNER, Manager, DEL MONTE, CAL 



LOS ANGELES-HAN DIEGO STANDARD GUIDE 



encloses within its walls the original 
adobe Glenwood built by Mr. Miller and 
his father in 1875. This now serves as 
the tea room. Walking around the out- 
side of the inn you will see that the wall 
on the east or Orange Avenue side is a 
reproduction of the buttressed side wall 
of San Gabriel Mission. On the north 
or Sixth Street side the fachada of Santa 
Barbara has been the motif. On the cor- 
ner of Sixth and Orange streets is a re- 
plica of the dome of the Carmel Mission 
A colonade of arches which San Fernando 
and Capistrano missions have suggested 
faces the Seventh Street side, and in the 
courtyard is the campanile patterned from 
ban Gabriel. Within the beamed ceiling 
of the cloister music room is copied from 
that of San Miguel Mission and the bal- 
cony rail is a copy of the altar rail of 
the same church. 

? Mr. Miller's collection of bells is world 
famous, the most valuable in the United 
States. They are hung in the Garden of 
the Bells, a roof garden prepared for 
them. They number nearly three hundred, 
ranging from harness bells to church bells, 
of all ages and from all lands. The study 
of their forms, the materials of which 
they are made, their histories and the 
quaint legends many of them bear would 
furnish hours of interest. 

Mr. Miller's collection of crosses is the 
largest in the world. The smaller ones 

are in a cabinet in the cloister music 
room. 

It would lake too long to enumerate all 
the beauty and interest contained within 
these • Avails. The rooms themselves are 
worthy of study, the Carmel room, the St. 
Cecelia room, the Japanese landing, the 



cloister 



walk, the 
Refecterio 



growth 



of wor- 



Colonial landing, the cloister 

music room and the „ Vi . wuollu 
with its groined arches, stained glass win- 
dows picturing scenes, industries and rec- 
reations connected with the life of the 
missions, and a bas-relief by Richard 
Lalder representing the 
ship from the fire worshippers down to 
Christian times. If one room of this won- 
derful inn can stand out above all the 
other fascinating ones it is the cloistei 
room. This is of noble proportions, with 
a great organ at one end. There is music 
here daily at one, five and eight o'clock. 
It is an experience never to be forgotten 
to sit in the choir stalls, fashioned after 
those of Westminster Abbey, and listen 
to the moving tones of organ and harp, 
now m some masterpiece, again in simple, 
familiar melodies, while the eye lingers 
on each beautiful object that goes° to 
produce this mellow old-world effect— the 
paintings; the armor; the stained glass 
windows; the banners brought from an- 
cient buildings in the old world hanging 
over the # balconies; the panels from an 
old Spanish church of the year 1400, the 
lamps, the carved monastery table over 
three hundred years old— all these and 
more. During the winter and spring months 
a song service is held here every Sunday 
night. National hymns of different coun- 
tries, ballads, college songs, familiar patri- 
otic airs and the standard old hymns are 
sung. The bells of the campanile chime 
the hours and whatever the special in- 
terest of the moment, it is forgotten while 
the sweet tones of "Mv Old Kentucky 

"The Rosary," "Abide With 
Me," or some other old-time favorite falls 



Home," 



upon the ear. 




VIEW OF TENT CITY FROM TOWER OF HOTEL DEL CORONADO, CORONADO BEACH 




OVERLOOKING CENTRAL PARK 
HOTEL IN FOREGROUND 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



Auditorium 

Hotel 



B. F. &, M. S. GREEN, Proprietors 

Convenient, Yet Quiet 

Especially Desirable for Ladies 

Traveling Alone 

150 OUTSIDE ROOMS 

75 BATHS 



Fifth and Olive Sts. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL 



! 



E°5 ANGELES dS 



JtCQ 



HI -1 iii if [If^i^^ 




©WAREHQU5F 




-3 i& r-rnar mm* *.«» 



m 








! 



A SAFE AND SECURE PLACE TO STORE HOUSEHOLD GOODS, 

PERSONAL EFFECTS, TRUNKS, ETC. 






EXPERT MOVING 



PACKING AND SHIPPING 



LOS ANGELES WAREHOUSE CO 




I 



•» 



t 



316 Commercial St 



LOS ANGELES, CAL 



Main 4787 A-4727 



. 



LOS ANGELES, GAL. 



Tfotel 




erman 



$5 



$ 



314 West Fourth Street, near Broadway 

$6 and $7 a week; $1 a day 

Rooms and suites with bath at attractive rates 

ATTRACTIONS — A modern house of 150 rooms, unsurpassed 
in situation, furnishings, bedding and cleanliness. 

PATRONAGE — The Sherman is favored by those who demand 
simple elegance, adequate but unofficious service, and quiet, rather 
than the bustle and ostentation of the largest houses. Beside its 
extensive following of permanent guests, about 1000 tourists and 
suburbans register each month at The Sherman. 

WRITE FOR INTERESTING FOLDER 




HOTEL ALHAMBRA 

and ANNEX abso KS r y oof 

316 N.Broadway, Los Angeles 

J. R. HANKLA, Manager 

Hotel — European Plan, $1.00 per day up. 
With Private Bath, $1.50 per day up. 

ANNEX APARTMENTS 

323 N. BROADWAY, Opposite Hotel 

Appointments pleasing. Low Summer Rates, Excellent 
Apartments. Convenient to Shopping and Amusement 
Centers. 




WHEN IN 



Los Angeles 



STOP AT 
THE 



ST1LLWELL 



Absolutely Fire Proof Hotel SOUTH GRAND AVE. 

Each room with Private Bath. All Outside Rooms 



Rates $1.50 per Day and Up 



European Plan 



The Still well has just been completed, is strictly first-class and is one of the 
most desirable and handsome hotels in Los Angeles with luxurious comfort at 
very moderate prices. 

We Make Special Rates by the week 

Phones: 60297, Broadway 237 C. II. STILLWKLL, Mgr. 





































ROM out of 

the East 



$e Sunsfiine Belt to tfie Orient 






comes a note of appreciation of SECURITY service and ac- 
commodation. 

■ 

We take the liberty of quoting from the letter of a recent 
sojourner in Los Angeles : 

"I was especially impressed with the busy scenes 
each day in your bank, and with the courtesy and 
efficiency with which business seems to be handled. 
I can never forget the courteous attention shown 
me by your officers and clerks." 



/ 



_ar4*>? 



ft£s2 



i*.-.*i-<»*»(«*it 



■ 









r 



* 



It is the constant aim of the SECURITY i 
welfare of its customers — over 86,000 of them 

— to do everything to make their banking b 
able and profitable 



further the 
at all times 



agree 



and to place safety of money deposited, above every 
other consideration. 

SECURITY accounts pay the highest rates of interest 
consistent with safe, conservative banking. Savings Accounts 
in this Bank are, by law, free and exempt from city, county 
and state taxes. 




ECURITY trust 



&SAVIXGS 



Oldest and Largest Savings Bank 




in the Southwest 



SECURITY BUILDING 

Fifth and Spring 



Los Angeles 



EQUITABLE BRA 

First and Spring 



KOREA 18000 TONS 



/'. r 






L 






SIBERIA 18000 TONS 









■*? 



* p 



A tjt—l 



» &W 9 rv*rm&*. 



— - **** 



^itW* 



MANCHURIA 27000TONS 



y»v> 






■ 






•J*** 



3w* 









A^ONGOLIA 27000TONS 



Why Not 

Spend Your Vacation 

Tropics? 

■ 

Beautifu l Hawaii. 

Japan, China, 

The Philippines 

■ 

The expense is small. Send 

Free Copy of "How 
Toured the Orient for 

500 

You have heard your friends speak of the 
Luxurious Service on the Big; 4 
Magnificent Deck Promenades, Spacious 
State-rooms, Swimming Tanks, and the 
Unsurpassed Cuisine in charge of Mr. 
V. Moroni, of International Fame. 

Now 

is the time to go; the Orient will wel- 
come you; your only regret will be you 
have not gone long ago. 

Round Trip to Japan $225.00; Hongkong and 

Manila $262.50. 
Round-the- World from $500 up. 



Pacific Mail Steamship Company 



The only American Line Crossing the Pacific 



R. P. SCHWERIN. 
Vice-President and General Manager 



H. N. THOMAS, 

Acting General Passenger Agent 






GENERAL OFFICES: FLOOD BLDG., SAN FRANCISCO 



■•— ^^M 




ooo 

















• 



anama-California Exposition 



SAN DIEGO, 1915 



~*r 



AN DIEGO, California, will hold a Universal 
Exposition during the entire year of 1915. This 
exposition will be unique, and in almost every 
aspect different from any other international exposition 




ever 



held. 



i J 



As a Mission City, its buildings will impress the observer 
with their novelty and their artistic adaptation to the 
fundamental purpose of the enterprise. Its management 
hopes to make the contrast between the strictly industrial 
and commercial characteristics of universal expositions 
and its unique, artistic, spectacular and educational 
character so marked that there can be no comparison. 

The Panama-California Exposition will be held in a mag- 
nificent fourteen-hundred-acre park, in the heart of the 
city of San Diego. Here, in conjunction with it, through- 
out the year of 1915, will be held a great Indian Congress. 
This will bring together and classify all of the aboriginal 
tribes of sub-tropical America, with their industries, handi- 
crafts, customs and modes of life. It will contain the 
greatest ethnological and archeological exhibit ever seen. 
Contrasted with this will be such an exhibit of modern 
life as shall bring into sharp relief every advantage of 
the soil and climate, and the methods of industry that 
will illustrate the progress of the past and illuminate the 
possibilities of the future. 

The Panama-California Exposition will be a vivid expo- 
sition. It will exhibit processes rather than products. 
In those industries that pertain to the soil, for instance, 
it will illustrate how irrigation may be most advantage- 
ously applied, rather than what its best results are. In 
the mining industry the processes used in extracting the 
metals will be shown instead of the metals in cases. 






The Panama-California Exposition will be more attractive 
than any exposition yet held. 



For full description of the Exposition see 
"Exposition Section" in this publication 




OOO 












4 








i 













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